How a drizzle turned into a Melbourne Storm

first_imgNow, as they enter their 20th season in the competition, the Storm are considered one of the powerhouse clubs in Australian sport and will head into the 2017 Telstra Premiership as title favourites alongside the Penrith Panthers. It’s a remarkable journey for a team that has been through so much over the past decade. From premiership success in 2007 and 2009, to the pain of the salary cap scandal in 2010, and then redemption in 2012, the Storm have been there or thereabouts for longer than any other team in the NRL.It wasn’t always that way.What started with a first-up win on a wet night in Wollongong in 1998 was quickly followed by premiership success the following season, but that’s when things started to slow down. When Cameron Smith debuted for the club in 2002, the Storm registered just nine wins in what was statistically the worst year in their history. That year the average crowd at Storm home games at Olympic Park was just 9,103, a figure that slumped to 8,887 by 2004. Coaches were coming and going, support was waning, and it was starting to show on the field. It looked like the naysayers were right. The hysteria generated by the 1999 premiership was fading. Enter the ‘Big Three’. Smith and fullback Billy Slater, along with coach Craig Bellamy, were established figures, but Cooper Cronk’s emergence as first-choice halfback in 2006 signalled a colossal change in the club’s fortunes. With the rise of Greg Inglis as a superstar centre, the Storm made four grand finals on the trot, winning premierships in 2007 and 2009 that would later be stripped as part of salary cap punishments. That could have been a hammer blow to the organisation. Instead, it galvanised the club.The Storm averaged 14,670 fans per game that year – a record at the time – having made the permanent move to the state-of-the-art facilities at AAMI Park. On-field success returned with an emotional grand final win in 2012, and they nearly went all the way again last year, only for the Sharks to celebrate their own fairytale win in dramatic circumstances. ‌But the most profound change has happened off the field. The Storm boasted a record crowd average last season (19,024) and there is a genuine buzz around the city of Melbourne when it comes to rugby league. As of February 22, the club has registered 16,296 members – nearly 3,000 more compared to the same time last year and fourth amongst the 16 NRL clubs – and that’s the tip of the iceberg according to their skipper, Cameron Smith.     “We’re nearly passed our membership mark of last year and we’re aiming for 20,000 this year which would be fairly significant for a rugby league team in Victoria,” Smith told NRL.com. “If someone said 20 years ago that there was going to be a successful rugby league team in Victoria then you probably would have been laughed at. It’s come a long way in a short amount of time. “That’s on the back of what the club and the players have put into Victoria, particularly the Melbourne region. “Victorians love their sport, and they get behind their local teams. We’re fortunate to be the only league team in town but we don’t see ourselves competing with AFL; we want to work alongside those guys to create the best product possible for Victoria. “People that follow football in general – no matter the code or who they support – they’ll come down to support the Storm and be a part of our organisation.”While the Storm have been the main attraction over the past 20 seasons, the NRL has rewarded Melbourne for its continued support of the game with blockbuster events such as the 2014 Four Nations clash against England, State of Origin matches, as well as the 2017 World Cup opening fixture later this year. “A lot of the credit has to go to the NRL,” Smith said. “They’ve taken some pretty significant games down to Melbourne – World Cup games, Four Nations matches… State of Origin has been hugely successful down there. We had the largest State of Origin crowd in history two years ago with roughly 92,000 fans coming to the MCG. “It shows there is huge interest in our sport and you can see it at junior level.”That rise in junior participation has been evident on and off the field, with former Storm centre/winger Mahe Fonua the first Victorian born and bred player to represent the club in 2012. He was closely followed by Young Tonumaipea who became the second local junior to represent the club in a sign that more and more kids in Melbourne are participating at grassroots level. “There are so many more kids playing our game down there now,” Smith noted. “Anywhere we go in the community, most people know who the Melbourne Storm are, what we’re doing down there, and they know a lot of the players as well. “It’s clear to see how far we’ve come – we still want to make it bigger and better for kids coming through to play our game – but it’s certainly in a great spot at the moment.”last_img read more

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Russia and Ecuador: rivals of Spain in the Davis Cup finals

first_imgThe following ball was extra benevolent, as Ecuador got here out, one of the rivals with much less potential in pot three. Thus, the staff led by Sergi Bruguera will most definitely play for the quarterfinal match with Russia, one of the nice contenders for the title because of the nice roster of gamers it has in its ranks, all situated in the elite world tennis: Daniil Medvedev, Karen Khachanov, and Andrey Rublev.The corporate won’t be simple, however with Nadal, Bautista, Carreño, Feliciano and firm, the double at the Caja Mágica (from November 23 to 29) is feasible. Luck was elusive for the Spanish tennis staff forward of the subsequent Davis Cup finals. One of the ‘coconuts’ of the draw, situated in pot 2, was Russia, exactly the first rival that got here out in the draw held at the ITF places of work in London for group A, that’s, the one led by Spain.last_img read more

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Bolt clocks sub-10 to win in Ostrava

first_imgUsain Bolt registered his first sub-10 run for the season with a 9.98 seconds win in the 100m at the Golden Spike meeting in Ostrava a short while ago.  Bolt, was sluggish out of the blocks but had soon covered the field before running by himself to the line in what was only his second sub-10 second time in the month of May since 2012. Bajan Ramon Gitten was second in 10.21 with Hassan Taftian taking third in 10.25. In the women’s 400m, Christine Day came out on top in a season’s best 51.09 seconds ahead of Cartine Muir, 51.84 and Jessica Beard, 51.881. The men’s equivalent was won by Javon Francis in 44.87 with Tony McQuay taking second place in 45.17 ahead of third placed Pavel Maslak, 45.46 Kaliese Spencer (55.43) had to settle for second place in the women’s 400m hurdles behind Joanna Linkiewicz, who ran a personal best 55.40 with Zuzana Hejnova finishing third in 55.69. Jaheel Hyde clipped the second to last hurdle before falling to the ground, while contesting the top spots in the men’s 400m hurdles. Hyde got up and finished the race in 65.98 with LJ van Zyl taking the win in 48.67 ahead of Johnny Dutch, 49.09 and Patryk Dobek, 49.51.last_img read more

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EBOLA, the Deadliest and Scariest War

first_imgLast week Friday was the first sunny day of the week. Monrovia has been under torrential rains for the past six to seven days, rainy dark days. The day was declared “national holiday” so that all public places can be disinfected. After the early morning rain, a summer like-sun came out. I decided to go for a drive, starting in Paynesville to Mamba Point and New Kru town. Just to see, to get a feel of a city on the verge of panic, facing an invisible enemy.The streets were nearly empty. The dreadful traffic that moved at snail pace during workdays was clear. A few cars, almost no taxis. The few that ventured out were limited to carry only 4 passengers, one in front and three in the back.Monrovia is under siege. Attacked by a deadly virus that defies medicine. It is scary. We no longer shake hands, we no longer touch each other and we no longer hold hands. Hugging is out of question. I ran into a friend in a store, we had not seen each other for years. We rushed towards each other and stopped mid-way. We were going to shake hands but stopped, with our palms just a few inches from each other. We joked about not being able to touch each other. The store clerk wore gloves. There was a bucket with chlorine at the entrance, with a security guard sternly ensuring that people to wash their hands in a chlorine water before entering the store. The price of plastic buckets and sanitizers has shot through the roof. Bleach and soap have become more expensive. Some people wear plastic gloves around the clock. In public places, we dodge each other. No touching.  Fear is very palpable and visible people’s faces. For a week, I have not seen a single member of my staff. We work from home. When I returned home from my round-about town, I picked my phone and dialed all my friends and family. “Hey, how are you doing?” “I am here, alive.” “Just checking.” “Hm, this Ebola business.” The conversation went in the same direction. We gave each other the same advises: “Don’t go anywhere you don’t have to go. Don’t visit anyone. Don’t eat out. Wash your hands. Don’t let the children out.” I am about to lose the skin on my hands for washing them so much. Bleach. Everywhere in Monrovia, the scent of bleach is overwhelming.Radio programs around the clock have turned into discussions about Ebola and biblical hymns. People want to go to church or to the mosque and pray. But then you would sit next to someone else you don’t know. Children playing in the streets, kicking ball could brush against each other. Sweat transmits the Ebola virus. Bodily fluids are to be avoided.First, there was denial. A senior senator even said that government had invented Ebola to get money from donors. Some religious leaders ask people to pray or buy holy water to immunize them against the Virus. In every building, posters about the Ebola remind workers what not to do and what to do. If you have a headache that doesn’t go away, rush to the hospital. Nurses at times refuse to touch people coming with diarrhea or high fewer. The Ebola symptoms are akin to those of malaria. Malaria is a sort of a rite of passage in our county. Every respectable Liberian has had malaria. But now it is different. Fever, headache, running stomach, indigestion could all be sign of Ebola. And now, when people have these aches, they run away from the hospitals. Where Ebola kills all those brought in. Healthcare workers have been the greatest victims before public opinion accepted that Ebola really exists.Early July, In Kampala, where I went attend the African Faith Leaders on Post-2015, Dr. Thelma Awori, the Liberian Honorary Consul cancelled a business trip to Liberia where she was taking a group of people interested in aviation services. We were at the conference one day when we learned of the death of the Ugandan doctor, “Dr. Sam” as we all called him in Liberia, one of the first victims of Ebola. We met his wife and his children, including a ten-month baby. The family was preparing to visit him in Liberia during the school vacation. When Princess Sawyer caught the virus, he was the only one who tried to heal her. She died. He died. The brother of Princess Sawyer, our good friend Patrick Sawyer who drove to the hospital while she was bleeding died in Nigeria and caused panic in the mega city of Lagos. He was cremated, with all his belongings. Nigerian airlines stopped their flights to Monrovia and Sierra Leone.In Bomi, Dr. Sirleaf, the chief county medical doctor died. His son died. His girlfriend died. The rest of the family is quarantined.The Chief medical officer of JFK Medical Center, the oldest and largest hospital in the country, Dr. Brisbane died of Ebola. Two American doctors caught Ebola, both evacuated. Nine out of ten who catch the virus die. Now medical centers and clinics are shutting their doors.The level of fear, panic is at its peak. Rumors of dead bodies rotting in homes where nobody want to touch them or call the healthcare workers, because they would have to be “quarantined.” And being quarantined means death. There are rumors about doctors killing people to take their kidneys. Ambulances have been attacked and healthcare workers chased with cutlasses. Bitter cola is now on sale everywhere, even in the form of liquid. They say it cures Ebola. Or prevents it.The President put it simply: “Ebola is real. Ebola is here. Ebola kills.”  On the same day she was to leave the country to attend the US-Africa Summit, she went to Conakry to meet with leaders of Sierra Leone, Cote d’Ivoire and Guinea. The joint border of Guinea-Sierra Leone and Liberia seems to be the epicenter of the virus. People flee the area and carry the disease with them. In the forest region, where people eat “bush-meat” Ebola has killed many. Traditional funeral services led to the contamination of dozens of people.Cultural and religious beliefs about death and illness linked with mistrust in anything that has to do with government are the best allies of the Ebola virus. In the first cases in Guinea, one death lead to more than a dozen other deaths. Ebola virus is more potent on a dead body, because the entire body turns into a huge deposit of virus. But one only get it when you come in contact with a sick person.The level of fear and panic in Monrovia is now akin to that the days of Octopus, in 1992, when the NPFL attacked Monrovia and rockets were dropping at random, killings entire households. The difference now is that we knew where the rockets were coming from, we knew the face of the killer and we could fight back as we did. But this time around, we are fighting a war against an invisible enemy. We once exported violence and child soldiers, now, we could be exporting a deadly virus. But, it can be contained, as said Dr. Peter Piot, who identified the virus in Zaire, in 1976 and named it after the river Ebola.These are scary days in Liberia. At this rate, we will soon be cut off from the rest of the world. Already, flights are being suspended, borders are being closed. This is the unluckiest generation of Liberians, having lived through a deadly war that went on for decades, blood thirsty dictatorships and Ebola. What else can go wrong? Camus’s Pest or a Kafkaesque story seem to be unfolding, all at the same time.  Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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Transport Hike, State of Emergency Restrict Movement, Depopulate Monrovia

first_imgThe sustained hike in transport fares and the recently imposed State of Emergency have dramatically restricted movement and depopulated Monrovia, according to statistics of a week-long survey by the Daily Observer.The State of Emergency has, for the past week across the country, also relatively restricted the movement of food, other commodities and services.Central Monrovia and its suburbs are classic examples of how greater Monrovia has depopulated dramatically for the past one and half weeks.On top of that serious situation, the booming commercial activities in three of Monrovia’s commercial districts of Red-light, Duala and Waterside have dramatically dropped and prices of most critically needed commodities have sky rocketed.Transport fares for many Monrovia and surrounding routes have dramatically increased despite Commerce Ministry prohibition, and commuters and businesspeople continue to bear the brunt of the socio-economic hardships.Regrettably, essential food commodities that should be coming from rural Liberia have become so scarce that the average low income earners in Monrovia are being stretched to the limit.Some unscrupulous small businesspeople are taking advantage of the grave situation and escalating locally produced food commodities on the Liberian market to the detriment of ordinary Liberians.A week’s tour of the three major commercial districts in Monrovia revealed that prices of food and other commodities have tripled. Prices of food commodities in the three highly populated markets are preventing low income earners from buying and this is making it difficult to afford decent meals for their families.“This has led to genuine socio-economic belt-tightening and unbearable hardships in Ebola- stressed Liberia,” a political and economic commentator told the Daily Observer.Commentator Jackson Smith Davis, 55, suggested that strategies intended to implement the current State of Emergency should consider the fact that critically needed food commodities must come to the urban markets.“I must state quite frankly that the overstretched population cannot bear to cope with scarcity of critically needed food commodities, and this could generate to a full blown political and economic crisis [fueled by] resentment,” Mr. Davis cautioned.“While the Liberian Government and partners are heavily preoccupied with fighting the deadly Ebola virus in the country, other problems, including starvation, continue to send some Liberians to their early graves,” Mr. Davis said.A house wife of the Soul Clinic Community in Paynesville Tuesday told the Daily Observer that her every day  trip to the Red-light Market to buy food has become a nightmare, as the prices of food commodities are indeed beyond reach.Housewife Hawa Brown Washington also intimated that if the current trend continues unchecked by the Ministry of Commerce and Industry, starvation may engulf many homes in Monrovia and its environs.“I have seen many households going to bed without food owing to the unbearable escalation of food prices at the Red-light Market,” Mrs. Washington lamented.“Even the measurement sizes of greens of all varieties have been reduced to the extent that LD$500 cannot prepare decent meal for a family of five in Monrovia,” Mrs. Washington asserted.Since the official statement by the Liberian Government for immediate reduction in the prices of critically needed commodities such as rice and petroleum products, there has been an upsurge of prices of the same commodities in Monrovia and other parts of the country.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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GNNL Board Chairperson La Rose resigns

first_imgGuyana National Newspapers Limited (GNNL) Board of Directors Chairperson Jean La Rose has resignedGNNL Chairperson Jean La Rosewith effect from October 1, 2016.In a letter to subject Minister, Prime Minister Moses Nagamootoo, dated September 23, 2016, La Rose said, “at this point, I feel I am not contributing to the further development of the Board or the GNNL as I may have done if I had more time to dedicate towards fully understanding my role as Chair or as Director.”La Rose is quoted by the Government Information Agency (GINA) as saying that since taking up office the new Government has provided more opportunities and space to work with and on behalf of indigenous communities in Guyana and “this has grown resulting in the expansion of my work commitments and less time to dedicate to issues of the GNNL”.In his letter of acceptance, Prime Minister Nagamootoo said, “I accept your resignation with a heavy heart, but understand your reasons for doing so. I thank you for having accepted the challenge to serve as Chairperson and express my appreciation of your efforts to resuscitate the GNNL as a national newspaper and to improve professionalism among its many staffers.”Her resignation comes months after Imran Khan resigned from the National Communications Network (NCN) board. La Rose was appointed chairperson of the GNNL Board on September 15, 2015.last_img read more

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When the boss is a jerk

first_imgIf you’ve worked for long, you’ve probably had a boss or co-worker who was a complete, flaming jerk. Maybe she always scowled as if she smelled something bad while reviewing your work. Maybe he never missed a chance to berate you in front of others. Or he interrupted constantly when you were talking. Or sneaked up behind you at your desk. Or helped herself to your food. Robert I. Sutton, a professor of management science and engineering at Stanford Engineering School, has heard it all while working on his recently released best seller, “The No A—— Rule.” If that’s not possible, he suggests checking out emotionally. “Passion is an overrated virtue in organizational life, and indifference is an underrated virtue.” The Associated Press interviewed Sutton, who describes workplace monsters with a mild expletive, which has been changed here to “jerk.” Excerpts: Q: First, let’s define who we’re talking about. You define work jerks as people who pick on those beneath them and leave others feeling belittled and sapped of energy. What are some other signs? A: To me, the main sign of someone who’s a certified jerk is someone who leaves a trail of people feeling demeaned and de-energized. It tends to be more often associated with power dynamics – they kiss up to those above them and kick down those beneath them. About a third of the time, bullying is peer on peer. Q: Since workplace jerks tend to pick on people below them, how can the victims, who usually don’t have much power, fix the problem? A: In normal organizational life, for people who have less power, the best thing is to get out. If you can’t do that, try to avoid contact with the person as much as possible. You can also learn not to care. The other thing is to find little ways to get control and fight back. One woman whose boss was always stealing her food reshaped Ex-Lax to look like candy, then her boss stole it. My favorite story comes from a former CEO who told me about her worst board member. When he’d call and scream, she’d lean back in her chair, put her feet on the desk, put him on speakerphone, turn off the volume and do her nails. She would check in from time to time to see if he was still screaming. When he was done, she would reason with him. She put herself in a relaxed position and did something she could control – her nails. Q: You describe ways to screen for jerks, such as Southwest Airlines Co.’s refusal to hire a pilot who was rude to a company secretary, and Virgin Group Ltd. founder Richard Branson’s ruse on his reality show, in which he picked up contestants while disguised as an arthritic old driver and ejected the two who treated him poorly. How else can an organization separate the monsters from the rest? A: In fields where there are relatively small and tight networks, people get reputations that are deserved. In my field of academia, we know each other. There are excellent scholars who are not considered because no one wants to work with them. Q: Is there such a thing as a sick organization? Can a workplace grow jerks? A: Some organizations are sicker than others. Exhibit One is Hollywood. I have a cousin who works in the industry. I asked her to name the nice people in Hollywood and there was this long pause, and she eventually named Steven Spielberg and Danny DeVito. Maybe the worst occupation is doctors. Based on studies, as far as a high rate of abuse, nurses really have a brutal time. Ninety percent of nurses report six to 12 incidents of verbal and emotional abuse per year. Q: You suggest companies perform an audit, quantifying in dollar figures how much a jerk’s poor behavior costs. Then you give an example of a company that did, and figured one salesman’s bad behavior had cost it $160,000 a year. Instead of firing him, the company took about $100,000 out of his bonus. Can you tell us about a company that purged its jerks instead? A: I can’t name the company, but it was a Fortune 500 retailer. As part of a turnaround, the new CEO came up with a mafia-style hit-list of 25 of the biggest jerks. He wanted to get rid of them all at once, but human resources said, “Let’s get rid of them through the performance evaluation process.” The company did and my informant said you could see, even at the store level, less nastiness. Q: One of your solutions to workplace jerks seems to be to stop hiring them. Other solutions include (one similar to) giving referees at youth soccer matches the power to “red card” abusive parents and eject them from the game, and shaming jerks when they behave poorly. What do you consider your top solution to the problem of jerky behavior? A: First thing: I believe that some polite self-awareness helps. There’s a test you can take; we put this on Guy Kawasaki’s blog, http://electricpulp.com/guykawasaki/arse/. Second, there should be consequences. People should know it’s not efficient and it’s going to cost them. My wife is a lawyer. She said with the more aggressive attorneys at her firm, in compensation discussions with them, the partners tell them they should cool it a little bit or it will cost them.160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! The book grew from a piece he wrote for The Harvard Business Review in 2004 under the headline, “More Trouble than They’re Worth.” The piece, he said, inspired an outpouring of jerk-boss e-mails from around the world. His correspondents included the manager of a roofing company, the CEO of a money-management firm and a researcher for the Supreme Court. Since the book came out, he said, he gets at least 15 e-mails a day from people with horrible bosses. “I feel like Dr. Phil,” the talk-show therapist, he said. He argues that companies should screen for jerks as they hire and purge the bullies already in their ranks because, in almost all cases, they cost more than they contribute. One of his other solutions may deflate anyone who works for a jerk: Leave the job. last_img read more

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Chelsea into FA Cup semis, to face Southampton as Utd pair Spurs

first_imgAlvaro Morata’s first goal since Boxing Day on his return to the Chelsea starting line-up put the visitors on course to bounce back from their Champions League elimination at the hands of Barcelona in midweek.However, Jamie Vardy’s equaliser 15 minutes from time made them do it the hard way in an extra 30 minutes.Yet, for all Antonio Conte’s complaints this season about his side’s strength in depth, the Italian was able to call on Pedro to turn the game in Chelsea’s favour when he headed home former Leicester favourite N’Golo Kante’s cross.Chelsea had lost three of their past four matches to fall behind in the race for a top-four finish in the Premier League as well as their European exit.But victory does at least keep their chances of silverware to end the season alive.Chelsea will meet Southampton in the last four, while Manchester United face Tottenham Hotspur for a place in the final.Both Morata and Pedro had a point to prove after being left out of the Spain squad on Friday just three months ahead of the World Cup.Morata was recalled for just his second start since the sides last met in a 0-0 draw at Stamford Bridge back in January.And after a quiet start, Chelsea’s club record £70 million buy from Real Madrid was presented with his first big chance of the afternoon when he was brilliantly picked out by Marcos Alonso’s low cross, but his shot was far too close to Kasper Schmeichel.– Morata ends drought –Chelsea’s Alvaro MorataMorata headed another half-chance from a teasing Willian cross over and then hit the outside of the post from the narrowest of angles.The goal he craved finally arrived three minutes before half-time, but much of the credit must go to Willian who surged through the heart of the Leicester midfield on the counter-attack before feeding Morata.And Morata coolly clipped the ball beyond the advancing Schmeichel with an assuredness unbefitting of a striker who had gone 13 games without a goal.Despite going in front, Conte still withdrew Tiemoue Bakayoko at half-time after another awful 45 minutes for the Frenchman in a desperately disappointing debut season in English football following a £40 million move from Monaco.The visitors were happy to take their chances on the counter-attack in the second period as they began to feel the after-effects of their run around at Barcelona in midweek.Leicester’s search for an equaliser was largely laboured and, even when a big chance did arise, Vardy headed wastefully over when completely unmarked inside the area.However, the England international made amends 15 minutes from time when he forced the ball home at the third attempt after Vicente Iborra’s first two efforts were blocked and then saved by Willy Caballero.Only a fine low save from Caballero prevented Vardy from turning the tie completely around eight minutes later as both sides settled for extra time.Crucially, Conte was able to refresh his side as Pedro, Gary Cahill and Olivier Giroud were all introduced in the first half of extra time.And it was Pedro who proved the match winner in unfamiliar fashion as he rose to outjump Schmeichel and nod into an unguarded net.0Shares0000(Visited 1 times, 1 visits today) 0Shares0000Chelsea will face Southampton in the semisLEICESTER, United Kingdom, Mar 18 – Pedro Rodriguez came off the bench to halt Chelsea’s slide with an extra-time winner in a 2-1 victory at Leicester on Sunday to reach the FA Cup semi-finals.Chelsea will now face Southampton in the last four while Manchester United will take on Tottenham Hotspur in a mouth watering clash.last_img read more

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POPULAR INDIAN RESTAURANT IN DONEGAL GIVEN GOLD STANDARD AWARD

first_imgA hugely popular Indian Restaurant based in Donegal Town, has enjoyed an incredible week! The superb Chandpur Indian Restaurant, firstly received a Gold Standard Restaurant Award 2016 from Restaurants Ireland They were then listed in the Lucinda O Sullivan Guide 250 Best Places to eat and Stay 2016, which only 15 eateries in Donegal were mentioned – and the Chandpur Indian Restaurant was the only Indian Restaurant in Donegal listed.And to top it all off, they have just received their third 5 STAR 2016 Certificate of Excellence today from Trip Advisor.Owner Rana Miah told Donegal Daily, “This is our HAT-TRICK of 5 Star Certificates of Excellence!“We received our first in 2014 and our second in 2015. “We are amazingly proud as there are very few restaurants who hold the coveted 5 Stars at all, but we have managed to receive them and maintain them for three years and as we have over 500 reviews from Trip Advisor Reviewers it makes it even more special.“We went to the Number One position for Restaurants in Donegal Town and County Donegal three years ago this month on Trip Advisor and we have kept this position, thanks to amazing reviews from customers and our amazing team who deliver 100% for the restaurant on a daily basis.POPULAR INDIAN RESTAURANT IN DONEGAL GIVEN GOLD STANDARD AWARD was last modified: August 25th, 2017 by Mark ForkerShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:BusinessChandpur Indian Restaurant in Donegal Town.newslast_img read more

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SOLICITOR AND PHARMACY IN LEGAL BATTLE OVER ALLEGED LEAKY ROOF

first_imgA SOLICITOR’S firm has failed in an attempt to have a legal action from its neighbour thrown out of court.Seamus Gunn, trading as McCloughan Gunn Solicitors, applied to Letterkenny Circuit Civil Court to have a legal action from Ruth’s Pharmacy struck out.Siobhan and John Logue, owners of the pharmacy on High Road, Letterkenny, have issued legal proceedings against the solicitor’s firm alleging the loss of tens of thousands of euro. They say excess water running from the legal firm’s office has caused damage to their property next door.However barrister Ciara Fitzgerald, acting for solicitor Seamus Gunn, applied to Judge Francis Comerford to have the claim for damages struck out.Ms Fitzgerald alleged, among other things, that an extension at the rear of the pharmacy which was the subject of the claim, had never been given planning permission.As such, her client had never been given the opportunity to object to the construction and therefore had never been given a chance to object to the extension.However barrister John McLaughlin, instructed by solicitor Kieran O’Gorman and acting for the Logues, said the case should only be dealt with at hearing.Mr McLaughlin said that McCloughan Gunn solicitors hadn’t produced any evidence in its legal papers to back up the allegation the extension didn’t have planning permission other than the opinion of an architect.Even if it didn’t, he argued, the Logues had a right to sue for damages caused by the alleged neglect of the buildings by Mr Gunn.Judge Comerford agreed with Mr McLaughlin.He said in order to strike out a case, and without prejudice to any future hearing, it had to be “impossible” for a plaintiff to win a legal action action.He said among the strongest rights available to a citizen is the right to access to the courts.Restricting such rights would be an abuse of the process and he could see no basis to restrict the process in this case.He refused Mr Gunn’s legal challenge and ordered the case could go ahead.He also awarded costs to the Logues but ordered there should be no enforcement on those costs until after the conclusion of these proceedings.SOLICITOR AND PHARMACY IN LEGAL BATTLE OVER ALLEGED LEAKY ROOF was last modified: May 2nd, 2015 by John2Share this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:McCloughan Gunn solicitorsruth’s pharmacylast_img read more

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