Keller Williams Announces New Studio Album ‘Add’, Shares Lead Single “The Big One” [Listen]

first_imgKeller Williams has announced his latest studio album, Add, due out on Friday, May 31st. The follow-up to 2018’s Sans, Add marks Keller’s 24th official studio album.Keller Williams’ forthcoming nine-track LP features new material, an old song that’s never seen the studio, as well as covers of Firehose’s “Brave Captain” and Joni Mitchell‘s “All I Want”. Co-produced, mixed, and recorded by Jeff Covert in Fredricksburg, Virginia, Keller handles guitar, vocal, bass, keyboard, and percussion duties on his latest studio effort.Ahead of Add‘s May 31st release, Keller has shared the albums lead single, “The Big One”. Keller shared his thoughts on the new song, explaining, “I’m excited for ‘The Big One’ to see the light of day as it’s had tons of stage time and no real place on any of my last few releases.”Listen to Keller Williams’ new single “The Big One” below:Keller Williams – “The Big One”[Audio: Keller Williams]See below for the album’s tracklist. Fans can head here to pre-order Add.For a full list of Keller Williams’ upcoming tour dates and ticketing information, head to his website.Keller Williams Add Tracklist:Beat My ChestThe Big OneDubstepBrave CaptainLandlordImpeding The HuntAll I WantPoser The FakeI BelieveView Tour Dateslast_img read more

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Briefs

first_img May 15, 2004 Regular News Briefs Shepherd named D’Alemberte professor Florida State University College of Law Professor Lois Shepherd has been appointed the D’Alemberte Professor of Law. The D’Alemberte Professorship was donated to the law school by the Miami-based Steel Hector & Davis. It was named for Sandy D’Alemberte, a former partner in the firm who served as dean of the law school from 1984-1989, and as president of the university from 1993-2003.“Steel Hector & Davis is committed to the Florida State University College of Law and the success of its outstanding students,” said Joseph Klock, the firm’s managing partner. “Several of the firm’s partners and associates are graduates. We are delighted that this endowment was awarded to Lois.”Shepherd, an associate professor, teaches contracts, professional responsibility and bioethics, and the law. Her upcoming book, titled The Bioethics and Law Casebook, is being published by the Aspen Press. Little wins civil liberties award Cheryl Little, executive director of the Miami-based Florida Immigrant Advocacy Center, will be presented with the 2004 Nelson Poynter Civil Liberties Award for her “outstanding commitment to preserving individual rights and liberties” at the American Civil Liberties Union Foundation of Florida’s 25th Annual Nelson Poynter Civil Liberties Award Dinner.Little has dedicated nearly 20 years to protecting immigrants, especially Haitians, from arbitrary treatment by government.The event will begin at 8 p.m., preceded by an open bar cocktail and hors d’oeuvres reception at 6:30 p.m., May 22, at the Hyatt Regency Coral Gables, 50 Alhambra Plaza, in Coral Gables.Michael Putney, senior political reporter for WPLG Channel 10, and contributing columnist for The Miami Herald, will serve as master of ceremonies.Little has challenged the detention of hundreds of Haitian asylum-seekers at the Krome Detention Center, arguing government policies discriminate against Haitians based on race and national origin. She also opposed a Justice Department plan to give local and state police the power to enforce immigration laws in the wake of September 11.In 1996, Congress prohibited the federally-funded Legal Services Corporation from assisting undocumented aliens. That same year, Little started the Florida Immigrant Advocacy Center on a few hundred thousand dollars in grants and with a small staff. They inherited 3,000 cases, mostly Hispanic clients. FIAC has since grown to four offices, 18 attorneys, 17 paralegals, a $2.3 million budget, and more than 30,000 cases closed.The featured speaker at the dinner will be Barry Steinhardt, director of the National ACLU’s Program on Technology and Liberty. He will discuss the ACLU’s fight against government and private sector data-mining programs such as the MATRIX, a database surveillance system originating in Florida that creates dossiers about individuals from government databases and private-sector companies that compile files on Americans for profit. He also will give a recap of the ACLU’s lawsuit challenging the Transportation Security Administration’s “no-fly” list.Tickets are $150 per person. For reservations contact Elaina Ozrovitz at (305) 576-2337, ext. 13, or via email at [email protected] Law Week activities focus on Brown v. Board of Ed. Florida lawyers, statewide and national bar associations, and community and judicial groups participated in a variety of activities to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the U. S. Supreme Court’s decision in Brown v. Board of Education during Law Week.Activities, ranging from speaking engagements at local schools to mock trial competitions, commemorated the significance of the decision that desegregated public schools.This year’s national theme is “To Win Equality Law: Brown v. Board of Education at 50.”“This case changed our nation. It reinforces the constitutional right that all people are equally protected under the law regardless of race, “ said Harold N. Hume, chair of the Bar’s Voluntary Bar Liaison Committee and statewide Law Week chair. “Law Week gives us an opportunity to share with our communities our commitment to the rule of law and our commitment to a fair and impartial system of justice.”This year marks the 46th annual nationwide observance of Law Day. In 1961, May 1 was designated by joint resolution of Congress as the official day to celebrate Law Day. In 1998, the Florida Legislature established the annual commemoration as an official day and designated week.“On Law Day, I think our nation can reflect on and consider how we might as a country and how we might as a people appreciate the contributions that ethnic minorities have made to (the) world and American civilization,” said ABA President Dennis W. Archer, in an interview discussing the impact of Brown v. Board of Education. Students tour courthouse Fifth-grade students toured the George Edgecomb Courthouse to begin the traditional kick-off of the Courthouse Tours during Law Week.Lawyers from the Hillsborough County Bar Association show the student the highlights of their professional arena. After observing court proceedings and walking through the halls of justice, the students gathered in Courtroom 1 each morning during the week at 11:15 a.m. to talk with judges and watch a short video, Who is Linda Brown?, which provides some clues as to why their present day classrooms look like they do. To Win Equality by Law: Brown v Board at 50 is the theme selected by the AB A for Law Week this year because of the historic anniversary of this legal decision. In the Brown v Board of Education case, the court struck down laws segregating public schools — because they recognized the need to fulfill the promise of the Constitution to a little girl named Linda Brown and other students like her. Edgecomb Bar celebrates Brown , awards scholarships The George Edgecomb Bar Association recently hosted its 21st Annual Law Week Scholarship Banquet in Tampa.To celebrate the 50th anniversary of Brown v. Board of Education an exhibit on the landmark case — on loan from the City of Tampa — was displayed at a reception before the banquet. GEBA also recognized the local school desegregation case, Manning v. Hillsborough County School Board, by acknowledging the families of the four plaintiffs of the case. Judge Elizabeth Kovachevich, who was involved in the case, was awarded the Francisco Rodriguez Award in recognition of her leadership in the federal bar and her excellence as a jurist.Florida Bar President Miles McGrane, along with presidents of Virgil Hawkins Florida Chapter of the National Bar Association, the Hillsborough County Bar Association, and the Hillsborough Association for Women Lawyers were in attendance.This year’s keynote speaker was Alison Bethel, the Washington bureau chief of The Detroit News. GEBA also awarded three scholarships to Tampa high school students. GEBA’s premiere scholarship is co-sponsored by the Hillsborough Education Foundation and provides four years of tuition at a Florida university. This year’s recipient of the scholarship is KeJuan R. Nedd, a freshman at King High School, where he has a GPA of 3.40. KeJuan plans to attend the University of South Florida and desires to become an astronomer.GEBA also awarded two $1,000 scholarships to Vincent E. Adejumo and Kristen S. Pinder. Adejumo is a senior at Middleton High School who plans to attend Florida State University this fall and major in computer science and then go to law school. ystems. Pinder is a senior at King High School and plans to go to the University of Florida this fall and major in veterinarian science. Gift to Florida State will foster mentoring Possessing the power to recommend sentencing for defendants can be daunting for a prosecutor right out of law school. But as an assistant state attorney in Duval County in the early 1980s, Michael Atter could turn to a long-time friend and seasoned attorney to help him gain a fresh perspective on tough cases.“When you’re a young attorney, you don’t have the real-life experience to flesh out what should be done in certain circumstances, so it’s helpful to have someone help you analyze the situation,” said Atter, a 1979 graduate of the Florida State University College of Law, and now a partner in the Jacksonville firm of Wood, Atter & Associates. His daughter, Lenorae Atter, is a 2003 graduate of the law school and works in his firm.Atter is hopeful that because of his recent $100,000 gift to the law school, students will have the opportunity to find the type of mentoring that helped him. The Atter Family Mentoring Scholarship will provide a summer stipend for students to be mentored by distinguished litigators in the Jacksonville area.Atter said he formed the idea for the mentoring scholarship after judging mock trial competitions involving Florida State law students.“I was impressed with their preparation, how they presented themselves, their verbal and nonverbal skills, and their well-thought-out arguments,” he said. “Students who have developed those skills will be invaluable to a law firm. But when you argue aggressively for a client, it can be easy to fall into the trap of forgetting about professional courtesy. The manner in which you go about doing your job doesn’t have to be offensive. That does a disservice to the attorney and to the law profession as a whole.” Caribbean Bar launches Central Florida chapter The Caribbean Bar Association recently launched its first chapter in Central Florida at the Marriott International Hotel in Orlando.Under the auspices of the consul generals from Jamaica, St. Lucia, and Trinidad and Tobago, and other local Caribbean-American organizations in the Central Florida area, the launching reception welcomed over 100 local businesses, community leaders, and members of the bench and bar.“Due to the growing Caribbean-American community in the Central Florida area, including Orange, Seminole, Volusia, and other counties, local attorneys of Caribbean descent in the area sensed the need to duplicate some of the similar efforts, initiatives, and successes in South Florida,” said Dahlia A. Walker, president of the Caribbean Bar Association.The interim executive board of the Central Florida chapter includes Michelle Tomlinson, president; Yolanda Lewis, vice president; and Dennis Chen, secretary/treasurer.The weekend’s activities also included a citizenship and voters’ registration drive at the Metro-West Church of the Nazarene in Orlando. Over 60 persons and families attended and completed their naturalization applications with the assistance of volunteer attorneys from the Caribbean Bar Association.For more information visit www.caribbeanbar.org. Mediators hold canned food drive At The Florida Academy of Professional Mediators’ Annual Education Conference in Orlando, the academy’s Community Involvement Committee held its first canned food drive.Members attending the conference were asked to donate at least one can of food for the needy, and they generously responded, said Bruce A. Blitman, chair of the Community Involvement Committee.The food was collected by the Second Harvest Food Bank of Central Florida. The food drive collected approximately 100 pounds of food, which will provide about 70 meals to hungry men, women, and children. This food will be distributed to nonprofit agencies serving those in need in Central Florida.As a result of the success of this initial food drive, the academy will sponsor another food drive in conjunction with the Florida Dispute Resolution Center’s Annual Mediation and Arbitration Conference in Orlando in late August. Seminar attendees will again be invited to donate at least one can of food when they come to the DRC conference. People who do not have time to shop or do not want to pack non-perishable food when they travel are encouraged to contribute with a tax-deductible financial gift.For more information about the academy’s food drive, contact Blitman at (954) 437-3446 or e-mail [email protected] Fowler White, Ernst & Young collect clothes Fowler White Boggs Banker and Ernst & Young pooled their resources to team up for the Dress for Success clothing drive in April and collected more than 150 business suits and dresses and more than 300 skirts, blouses, and slacks for the nonprofit organization.Dress for Success provides interview suits, confidence boosts, and career development to low-income women entering the workforce. Women are referred to Dress for Success by nonprofit organizations. Each woman receives three business outfits when she has a job interview and two more when she gets the job.Ceci Berman of Fowler White and Heather Willyard and Amy Keweshan with Ernst & Young coordinated the effort on behalf of their firms. NASA honors LeConey Miami native Amy Voigt LeConey has gone from being a hostess at the old General Cinema 10 at Miracle Center to being named by NASA’s legal program as the first recipient of the Rising Star Award for her support during the Columbia investigation activities and her role in a land transfer project.The 28-year-old Florida State University trained lawyer was presented with the award, which recognizes the best of NASA’s junior attorneys, at an April 27 conference at NASA’s Stennis Space Center in Mississippi.With less than 24 hours notice after the accident that claimed Columbia and her seven-member crew, she was sent to Barksdale Air Force Base field operations site in Louisiana to be the legal liaison to NASA’s Mishap Investigation Team.In the four weeks that she was there, LeConey worked on establishing jurisdiction over crew remains, handling financial and interagency coordination issues with the Federal Emergency Management Administration covering search and recovery issues in 29 states, coordinating a Department of Justice site visit to Barksdale, and overseeing data handling and impoundment procedures at Barksdale, Lufkin, Texas, and Carswell, disaster field offices.“Amy’s amazing success in providing sophisticated legal support to the huge and complex search and recovery effort was no fluke,” said Paul Pastorek, NASA’s General Counsel. “She made a presentation to the firm on an impending major environmental and real estate matter a couple of years ago that knocked everyone’s socks off. We’re fortunate to have her, and a group of other young lawyers just like her. They’re really excited about NASA and its mission. I hope they’re all still around, serving as our legal leadership when we land on Mars.” Smith lauded by law enforcement Eleventh Circuit Assistant State Attorney Michael Smith of the office’s organized crime division has been awarded the 2003 Law Enforcement Officer’s Foundation and the Dade County Chiefs of Police Law Enforcement Officer’s Award for State Prosecutor of the Year.This award was presented, not just for Smith’s “outstanding prosecutorial abilities” in the fields of money laundering and electronic surveillance, but also in recognition of his “commitment to achieving justice in every one of his cases.” Baker & Hostetler works with school The Orlando office of Baker & Hostetler celebrated its 25th anniversary by donating $25,000 to Orange Center Elementary School, as part of the Baker’s Educational Service Team program.“Baker & Hostetler has been our partner in education since 2001, they have made and continue to make outstanding contributions to our school, both in financial and volunteer support — they have truly made a difference to our students, our teachers, and our staff,” said Cynthia Drayton, principal of Orange Center.last_img read more

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Kids Chased by Pit Bulls in Uniondale

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Two pit bulls chased a group of kids and charged at police officers in Uniondale Friday, but nobody was injured, Nassau County police said.The two dogs got out of their fenced yard around 5:30 p.m., police said, and started chasing the group of kids. The pit bulls also charged at responding officers causing one of the cops to fire a shot, police said, but none of the dogs were hit.Emergency Service Officers also responded and were able to tranquillize the dogs using a dart, police said.“The dogs returned home where they were removed by the Town of Hempstead Animal Control,” police said in a news release.last_img

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Single taxi medallion loan sale not in best interest of CUs, members

first_img continue reading » ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr NCUA selling its portfolio of taxi medallion loans is not an appropriate step at this time, CUNA and three League partners wrote to NCUA, as it may harm not only the credit unions holding taxi medallion loans but ultimately all federally insured credit unions due to the effect on the National Credit Union Share Insurance Fund.“We urge the NCUA to refrain from such a sale and to instead engage with CUNA, the state leagues, and credit unions—both those directly and indirectly involved. Such collaboration could bring about a more creative solution than simply selling the entire loan portfolio to a single investor at a significant loss,” the letter reads. “While such a sale may be the quickest and easiest approach for the agency, it is not in the best interest of credit unions and their members, including borrowers who took out loans to obtain taxi medallions.”The signatories–CUNA, the CrossState Credit Union Association, the Illinois Credit Union League, and the New York Credit Union Association–urged NCUA to refrain from selling its entire taxi medallion loan portfolio to for-profit debt buyers for several reasons:Selling to a single investor, while quickest and easiest for the agency, would almost certainly result in a lower sale price, which would have a direct impact on the Share Insurance Fund;last_img read more

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Thailand faces biggest economic contraction since Asian crisis

first_imgThe Bank of Thailand left its benchmark interest rate unchanged after an emergency cut last week, while projecting the worst contraction in the economy since the Asian financial crisis more than two decades ago.The bank slashed its growth forecast for this year, now expecting the economy to shrink 5.3 percent compared with an earlier estimate of 2.8 percent expansion. Exports and tourism, the key drivers of Thailand’s economy, have both been hard hit as the coronavirus outbreak spreads around the world.The policy rate was maintained at a record low 0.75 percent Wednesday following a 25 basis-point reduction at an unscheduled meeting March 20. Four of the seven monetary policy committee members voted to hold, two called for a cut and one wasn’t able to attend. “We believe they can cut by another 25 basis points. They could have used all the space they have now,” said Burin Adulwattana, chief economist at Bangkok Bank Pcl. “The economy is on the brink of a recession with huge downside risk, so it’s time to do all they can.”Bank of Thailand Assistant Governor Titanun Mallikamas said Wednesday that policy makers stand ready to lower rates further if needed and will keep a close watch on markets, including the baht exchange rate. In a statement delivered through the Bank of Thailand’s Facebook page due to social-distancing precautions, he said the economy would recover only next year.The benchmark SET Index extended gains after the decision, surging 6.3 percent to 1,099.32 as of 3:32 p.m. in Bangkok. The baht fell 0.3 percent against the dollar, paring an earlier loss of as much as 0.5 percent.Topics :last_img read more

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Multi-million dollar sale of Brisbane architectural landmark

first_img188 Pacey Rd, Upper BrookfieldIn contemporary architecture circles, names don’t come much bigger than Donovan Hill Architects.The firm has won numerous awards for its single-letter designs through southeast Queensland, so when its “B-House” hit the market in 2016, the prospect of owning a habitable sculpture caused a fever among fans of modernist-influenced housing.The January sale of the property has now settled, with the $3.25 million price tag confirmed.The home at 188 Pacey Rd, Upper Brookfield sits on over 21 ha of private rural-residential land. It’s a perfect setting for this masterpiece.Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayNext playlist itemMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:25Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:25 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedQuality Levels720p720pHD540p540p360p360p270p270pAutoA, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.This is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xFullscreenDream Home: 40 Blackler St, Semaphore00:25 Related videos 00:25Dream Home: 40 Blackler St, Semaphore00:31Historic home for sale01:53Chill out in this underground home00:35Dreamy Victorian Terraces 01:00Historic bluestone cottage in Batesford00:48Art DecoThe house strikes a marriage of glass, brick, concrete, steel and timber that’s been causing design tragics to quiver.More from newsDigital inspection tool proves a property boon for REA website3 Apr 2020The Camira homestead where kids roamed free28 May 2019Its features include a rooftop desert garden and pond which adjoin a study on the upper level. A semi-exposed staircase takes you to the lower level where a stainless steel and marble kitchen is central to the main living space.The view from the kitchen hub looks across the alfresco to a monumental pool.The lower level also accommodates four bedrooms, two bathrooms plus powder room and enormous storage space.The seller, Roy Mills, told News Corp last year it took a long time to build the home because of high attention to detail.“The house was being built around the same time as GOMA was being built and GOMA almost got built faster than this,” he said.“It was only when we got the 3D model put together that I really started to understand it.” Timber decking and a desert garden provide a link to the upper-level study. The home, known as the “B House”, is considered a significant contribution to Brisbane’s architectural landscape.last_img read more

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Spotted: Big Ship Cranes Reach Prince Rupert

first_imgThe expansion of Prince Rupert’s Fairview Container Terminal in Canada’s British Columbia has reached another milestone with the arrival of three Malacca-max dock gantry cranes.The three gantry cranes entered Prince Rupert Harbour aboard the heavy load carrier ship Zhen Hua 25 on May 13.The offloading process is expected to take several days, the Princ Rupert Port Authority said.Each crane is equipped with a horizontal reach of 25 containers and is capable of working the largest vessels in the world, the authority said.When the expansion project is complete in the third quarter of 2017, the capacity of Fairview Terminal will increase by half-a-million TEUs, boosting its total capacity from 850,000 to 1.35 million TEUs.Operated by DP World (Canada) Inc., the expanded Fairview Container Terminal will include a second deep-water berth, three additional gantry cranes, and land reclamation to expand the container yard.Image Courtesy: The Prince Rupert Port Authoritylast_img read more

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Atletico Madrid hit with UEFA fine for crowd trouble

first_img Diego Simeone’s side were not the only Spanish club to receive a UEFA fine, with Valencia handed a €15,000 penalty for entering the field of play late in their game at Atalanta the day before. Barcelona received a €15,000 fine for a late entry during their clash away at Napoli, with the Italian side fined €27,000 for crowd trouble at the Stadio San Paolo. The La Liga giants were punished for blocking passages at the Wanda Metropolitano, alongside an additional €3,250 fine for lighting flares at the Anfield return leg on March 11, according to reports from Marca.Advertisement Atletico Madrid have been fined €24,000 by UEFA following crowd disturbances in their Champions League clash with Liverpool on February 18. Loading… center_img Read Also: Barcelona coach warned by UEFAIn the Europa League, Jose Bordalas’ Getafe have been fined €8,000 for blocking passages in their game with Ajax, with Dutch club slapped with a €40,000 penalty for serious crowd trouble at the Coliseum Alfonso Perez.Catalan side Espanyol were warned by UEFA for failing to separate fans during their last 32 tie at home to Premier League side Wolves.FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 Promoted Content7 Universities In The World With The Highest Market ValueBest & Worst Celebrity Endorsed Games Ever MadeWhat Happens To Your Brain When You Play Too Much Video Games?10 Hyper-Realistic 3D Street Art By Odeith2020 Tattoo Trends: Here’s What You’ll See This YearBirds Enjoy Living In A Gallery Space Created For Them7 Black Hole Facts That Will Change Your View Of The Universe7 Universities Where Getting An Education Costs A Hefty PennyMost Outstanding Female Racers Who Made History In SportsThis Guy Photoshopped Himself Into Celeb Pics And It’s HystericalCan Playing Too Many Video Games Hurt Your Body?Did You Notice How Natural Simba’s Movements Looked In The Movie?last_img read more

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Construction worker jailed over ‘shabu’

first_imgWhen frisked, Soriano yielded five moresachets of suspected illegal drugs. He was detained in the lockup facilityof the Molo police station, facing charges for violation of Republic Act 9165, orthe Comprehensive Dangerous Drugs Act of 2002./PN He was identified as 36-year-old FranieSoriano, a police report showed. Soriano – resident of Barangay WestHabog-Habog, Molo district – was nabbed after he sold a sachet of suspectedshabu to an undercover officer for P2,000 around 5:50 p.m. on Nov. 6, thereport added. ILOILO City – Police nabbed aconstruction worker in a drug buy-bust operation in Barangay West Timawa, Molodistrict. last_img

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Unlicensed gun, bullets seized

first_imgThe suspect wasdetained in the Isabela municipal police station’s lockup facility, facingcharges for violation of Republic Act 10591, orthe Comprehensive Firearms and Ammunition Regulation Act./PN BACOLOD City –For owning an unlicensed gun, a man was arrested in Barangay Cabcab, Isabela,Negros Occidental. The 43-year-oldresident Joemarie Yanson was caught after the police raided his house on thestrength of a search warrant around 7 a.m. on Jan. 24. Upon hisarrest, police recovered from Yanson a .45-caliber pistol with 36 live bulletsand four empty magazines. The weapon wasconfiscated after he failed to present its license.last_img

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