Soulive Brings GRiZ, Son Little, And The Shady Horns To Wednesday Bowlive [Photos]

first_imgSoulive | GRiZ, Son Little, Shady Horns | 6/14/17 | Photos by Andrew Blackstein Soulive is officially back and five shows into their eight-night run at New York’s Brooklyn Bowl. After a year and a half off from the traditional Bowlive residency, both the band and their fans have been primed and ready for each night of the run, gearing up for the final stretch and the coming madness to ensue as Bowlive comes to a close this week. With a different slate of guests each night, every show presents a new atmosphere for the sensational trio that is Eric Krasno, Neal Evans, and Alan Evans to do what they do best. One of the most anticipated lineups of Soulive’s run was Wednesday night, which saw Grant Kwiecinski (GRiZ), Son Little, and The Shady Horns grace the Brooklyn Bowl with their presence in addition to these masters. Special guest vocalist Ida Hawk also joined the fun for last night’s insane performance. You can check out some highlights from Instagram as well as check out a full gallery of photos from last night below, courtesy of photographer Andrew Blackstein. Load remaining imageslast_img read more

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Woman convicted in child’s death released on new evidence

first_imgAUSTIN, Texas (AP) — A Texas woman convicted of murder in the 2003 choking death of a boy she was babysitting was released from prison on bond after a judge said new evidence shows she she didn’t intentionally hurt the child. Travis County District Judge Karen Sage ordered Rosa Jimenez released on bond Wednesday, citing “clear and convincing evidence.” The Texas Court of Criminal Appeals will make the ultimate decision on whether to overturn Jimenez’s conviction or grant a new trial. Jimenez has served 15 years in prison in the death of 21-month-old Bryan Guttierez, who choked on a wad of paper towels while in Jimenez’s care.last_img

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Audubon Hosting Nature Photography Contest

first_imgImage by Rory Pollaro/WNYNewsNow.JAMESTOWN – The Audubon Community Nature Center in Jamestown is now accepting submissions for its 2020 Nature Photography Contest.Categories include:Wildlife Portraits: any wild animal, no photos of animals in captivity, such as pets, zoos, or rehab animals.Macro Abstracts: anything that is natural/wild such as flowers, insects, leaves, water droplets, eyes/feathers of animals, close-up textures in nature, etc.Habitats and Landscapes: places that any wild animals live in and/or waterfalls, sunsets, mountains, etc.Winners in both the adult, ages 18 or older, or out of high school, and youth, ages 8 to 18, or still in high school, divisions in all three categories will each receive a $200 cash prize.Center officials say Alex Shipherd will judge the submissions. The winning photographs and 12 finalists, six youth and six adults, will be displayed indefinitely on the contest website along with the photographer’s name and city.The Audubon will print the winning photographs for exhibit in the Nature Center.Deadline for submission of photographs is Sunday, June 28. Full details of the competition as well as images of previous winners and finalists can be found at ACNCPhotoContest.com.There is a $15 entry fee. The winners will be announced in mid-July. Share:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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White Mold Disease

first_imgMost Georgia peanut farmers do not spray fungicides on their crop at night. But University of Georgia plant pathologists say nighttime is the best time to spray for white mold disease.“The key to treating white mold is to get the fungicide through the dense leaf canopy onto the crown of the plant and along the limbs,” said Bob Kemerait, a UGA Extension plant pathologist based in Tifton.“Unfortunately, during the daytime, a lot of that fungicide is intercepted by the leaves.”To compensate, growers have to use water or irrigation to attempt to redistribute the fungicide to where it’s most effective. “If peanuts are sprayed at night, the leaves are folded up and you have much more of a direct path to the interior of the plant where you need protection from white mold,” said Kemerait.Many farmers are hesitant to spray at night due to the excessive hours they’re in the field and the inconvenience of later nights or earlier mornings.“A lot of growers, because of the idea of spraying at midnight or being up at 3 a.m. to spray peanuts, simply say, ‘I’m just not going to do it,’” Kemerait said. “Those who do spray at night are very satisfied with the results.”Nighttime spraying is an option thanks to Global Positioning Systems technology. GPS keeps the tractor on the row, in case the farmer’s visibility is hindered because of lack of light.Nighttime fungicide applications were developed by UGA Extension plant pathologist Tim Brenneman based on his observations of farming practices in Nicaragua. The new strategy is important because of the prevalence and potential severity of white mold (southern stem rot) disease. Slerotium rolfsii, the causal agent of white mold, is a fungus that survives in the soil between cropping systems. It waits there for the next susceptible crop to be planted. White mold fungus grows and attacks peanut plants along the soil line and near the soil surface. The limbs, crown and pegs of peanut plants, and the pods are often completely destroyed as a result.“I would say it’s the No. 1 diseases our growers need to be prepared to control,” Kemerait said. While white mold remains a threat to the peanut industry, the damage it causes have been hampered by improved management strategies implemented by Kemerait, Brenneman and other UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences peanut researchers.“We’ve got improved fungicides. We’ve also got some management strategies; spraying at night time and spraying early in the season,” Kemerait said. “We haven’t eliminated the problem by any means but we have a stronger arsenal in which to protect the peanut crop.”For more information about peanut research at UGA, see uga.edu/commodities/fieldcrops/peanuts/.last_img read more

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Wind Boom in Rural America Defies Party Lines

first_imgWind Boom in Rural America Defies Party Lines FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Wall Street Journal:Hundreds of wind turbines ring Fowler, their white towers rising for miles amid the golden-tipped cornfields and leafy soybean plants blanketing much of Benton County, pop. 8,650. More than half of the county’s 560 turbines are operated by BP, which has three wind farms here.Wind developers have made $17 million in payments to the county and have spent $33 million on roads, a boon for an economically struggling community that about a decade earlier considered hosting a waste dump to generate jobs and government revenue.The wind farms took hundreds of construction workers to build, and created 110 permanent jobs, mostly wind technicians—in charge of servicing and maintaining wind turbines—who, according to federal data, earn about $51,500 a year in Indiana.“Benton County didn’t see the recession until 2011,” said the county commission’s president, Bryan Berry, who has three turbines on his farmland. “The wind industry helped keep things open.”As wind becomes a bigger part of the U.S. electricity mix, it is becoming an economic force in rural communities such as Fowler, a development that is changing the political conversation around renewable energy in many parts of the U.S.Wind supplied just over 6% of the country’s electricity last year, and the industry employed close to 102,000 people—nearly double the number working in coal mining, according to federal data.President Donald Trump campaigned in part on reviving the U.S. coal industry, and has been critical of renewable-energy subsidies. But heavily Republican states such as Indiana, Iowa, Texas and Wyoming have embraced wind for the work and revenue it brings.More: ($) Wind Power Wins Converts in Rural U.S.last_img read more

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Mountain Medicine Part 6: How Nature Heals

first_imgCognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT), a form of talk therapy, is arguably the most popular form of mental health treatment available now. A therapist specializing in CBT may challenge a survivor’s negative thought patterns, encouraging them to recognize they are safe now, that the trauma was not their fault, and to process their emotions by recounting the experience in a safe environment. Though effective for many people, research is beginning to show that CBT may not be as effective for PTSD, and can even re-traumatize survivors by asking them to relive painful experiences.  Granny Women (or Granny Witches) were tough by definition. Surviving until old age meant surviving childbirth, illness, and injury in the most unforgiving landscape of the New World. Safe to assume they knew a thing or two about a thing or two. With no medicine or libraries within reach, they relied on Old World folk wisdom, Cherokee tradition, and their knowledge of the plants and land to take care of their own. During camp, survivors hike trails, cook, do yoga, make art, and participate in guided activities that heighten their senses. Survivors are invited to take off their shoes and put their feet in the dirt, listen to the sounds of the forest, or taste sassafras if they can find any. I was surprised to learn how simple it was, and how short in duration: only three days. No medicine, no hospitals, no doctors. That was life for early European settlers of the Appalachian mountains, and they preferred it that way. The fiercely independent Scotch-Irish immigrants wanted nothing to do with the ruling elite of the northern industrial cities and were willing to face off mountain lions to prove it. Isolated and self-reliant, the settlers had only one option in the face of medical emergency: go fetch Granny. TMI is more than an acronym I use when my friends overshare about their sex lives — too much information is a serious problem in the digital age. Reading, talking about, and researching a problem can feel deceptively like doing something about it. In reality, we end up stuck in the purgatory of analysis paralysis, making no decisions at all. And if the problem is emotional trauma, searching for the “right” answer might be the worst mistake you can make. In a way, Appalachia’s ecotherapists are kindred spirits. Though not out of necessity like their counterparts, and with more access to modern amenities, they still hold sacred the healing power that permeates these blue hills. After my experience in the labyrinth at the Edith J. Carrier Arboretum, I knew I needed more answers.  Watch an infant sleeping and observe how his belly naturally rises and falls. Most people don’t seem to do this anymore, holding their breath in their chest. When I mentioned this to Zehr, she nodded. “Shallow-breathing — that is, not belly-breathing — is a trauma response. A lot of people don’t realize that you won’t likely get through this life without experiencing trauma at some point, and no two people experience traumatic events in the same ways.” At the Center for Earth-Based Healing, participants didn’t talk about their trauma. They hiked trails, did yoga, ate oranges in the forest, practiced breathing, put their feet in the water, hugged trees. They immersed themselves in sensory experiences. I noticed some overlap between somatic and ecotherapy, perhaps because they both demonstrate that you don’t always need to poke around in the mind in order to heal trauma.  I’d heard of this notion at various workshops in the mental health field, of trauma trapped within the body. When a person experiences a threat (emotional or physical), the body revs its engines to prepare for fight, flight, or freeze. The heart races, muscles tense, adrenaline spikes, and breathing quickens. In the case of serious trauma, however, the body might remain caught in a state of arousal long after the threat is gone. But at camp, both Eden and De La Mora found a supportive network of fellow survivors and trauma-informed staff. Before starting a long hike, survivors talked about their fears. What are you expecting from this walk, what are you thinking, what are you feeling, what animals are you afraid of? “Everyone came into the woods with some fear and some challenge,” said De La Mora. “I wasn’t alone by a long shot. Nature levels the playing field. It doesn’t matter if you’re rich, poor, disabled — everyone experiences warm, cold, and fear.” A Different Kind of Granny Witch And yet, the results spoke for themselves, survivors lives permanently changed. One woman overcame injuries she believed were permanent, regaining the ability to hike and do yoga for the first time since leaving her violent marriage. Another woman, originally homeless and unemployed, found a job and her own apartment two months after completing camp.  Within two months of completing Camp Mabon, Eden had found an apartment and a new job. Now, she works as the Director of Social Media and Customer Service for a health and wellness company, living in her own home with her son and a loving, supportive partner. Eden still carries scars that remind her of the painful life she once thought she couldn’t escape. Now, she plans to cover each of them with a reminder of the strength she discovered in those woods, the first of which is the emblem for the Center for Earth-Based Healing. “In that weekend,” said Eden, “I found the power buried deep inside me. The same power that allowed me to survive for years in a situation that was in all honesty un-survivable. The power that had been lost in pain, depression and hopelessness. I rediscovered the person I was supposed to be, the person I had lost. I found her and I won’t ever let her go.” Healing injuries, solving homelessness? Without physical or talk therapy? I’ll admit it sounded like something you’d hear from a snake oil salesman or a faith healer’s tent. As a mental health professional, my primary goal was to get people to talk. But after my own ecotherapy experience processing the loss of my father without talk therapy, I was ready to believe. Both Eden and De La Mora were apprehensive when they arrived at camp. Eden admits she almost canceled several times, unsure of what to expect, or how it could help. Confined to her home and addicted to social media, she was concerned when informed there would be no cell phone service at camp. When De La Mora arrived at Douthat State Park on a chilly April weekend, snow still coated the ground and the forecast called for freezing rain. Almost in tears, all she could think was, “I can’t do it.” Needless to say, bodies are not meant to function in a highly aroused state for long periods of time. The consequences can manifest in headaches, earaches, insomnia, nightmares, itching and rashes, digestive problems, fatigue, hyperactive behavior, lower immune response, and much more. Trauma affects more than the mind, it can decimate the body. From an evolutionary standpoint, it’s easy to see why information might be so addictive. More information meant a greater chance of making the right decisions, and thereby a greater chance at survival. But when information is infinite (as it is with the advent of the internet), it can be more of a hindrance than a help. I’m always impressed by the lexicon we’ve created to define our new world and this phenomenon is no different: information overload, infobesity, infoxication. Goofy terminology, but accurate — with the world at your fingertips, gorging on information is the new normal. As the name implies, CBT relies on cognitive analysis. We want to understand ourselves, to make sense of the world, and discover solutions to our problems. We want information. But when arousal is high, as with anxiety and trauma, logic and executive functioning collapse. From someone who has experienced more than a few panic attacks, telling myself that I wasn’t actually going to die wasn’t convincing because the logical part of my brain had left the building.  So how does that work? I asked Zehr point-blank: “If participants aren’t processing or talking about the trauma, how do they heal?” “There’s magic that happens in those woods and it’s not something that I can truly take credit for,” Zehr said. “That’s Mother Nature.” I met with Michele Zehr, formerly a U.S. Marine, M16 rifle instructor, automotive technology professor, and self-defense instructor. Despite the list of impressive accomplishments, however, I hadn’t arranged to interview her about any of that. Zehr left it all behind to pursue what she thinks may be her life-defining work. Founder and Executive Director of the Center for Earth-Based Healing (CEBH), Zehr now dedicates her life to helping trauma survivors. Twice a year, the CEBH hosts weekend ecotherapy retreats free-of-charge for survivors at Douthat State Park in Millboro, Virginia. Zehr explained the significance of the image: based on the autumn and spring equinoxes, the time of year with equal parts light and darkness, positive experiences can bring balance to the shadow parts of life. Chronic stress impacts the body similarly to trauma: increased headaches, depression, heartburn, insomnia, rapid breathing, weakened immune system, risk of heart attack, high blood sugar, high blood pressure, gastrointestinal problems, and even fertility problems. If the stressors continue, says the American Institute of Stress: “just as any machine wears out… so do living organisms that sooner or later become the victim of this constant wear and tear.” Perhaps in the case of treating emotional wounds, logic needs to go out the window. As useful as the human language can be, sometimes we have to stop talking, stop reading, and stop trying to make sense of painful things, because sometimes the answers will come in a form other than words. And in order to find them, we need to get out of our heads and into the real world. Click here to read the whole article It took Jae De La Mora three years to leave her abusive marriage. When she finally got out, her injuries were so severe she spent most of her time bedridden. “I loved the outdoors, hiking, yoga,” she said. “But I thought it was never gonna happen again.” She left the state for protection, devastated by the ordeal and clueless about her next steps. A local women’s resource center suggested she apply for Camp Ostara, a retreat for survivors of domestic violence offered by the CEBH. “I really didn’t think it was going to help very much,” she said. “I thought I wasn’t capable — I had gained weight, I had injuries, I was out of shape. I figured, here goes nothing.” Healing from the Neck Downcenter_img In spite of not talking about her trauma, De La Mora discovered that she didn’t need to explain herself. “Trauma changes you,” she said. “Everywhere you go, you don’t fit. But in this place, you belong.” She learned about other women who had finished the camp with a variety of challenges — one morbidly obese, another woman blind in a leg brace. “If they could do it,” she thought, “I can too.” “A lot of the magic of ecotherapy is nervous system regulation,” said Zehr, who has received training in Somatic Experiencing through Dr. Peter Levine’s SE Trauma Institute. “Our minds may not completely pick up on what’s going on. But our bodies do. When we go outside, our body is like, ‘Oh, there I am,’ because our bodies are made of the same elements from which the Earth is made. In a sense, the body calms because it recognizes itself in nature.  And when the body is calm, it opens the mind to things that are often painful, things we avoid. Things like introspection and growth.” After my father died, I remained trapped in a never-ending to-do list in my mind. The list was rigid, it had rules, it had deadlines, it made sense. But it kept me from feeling anything, probably as my subconscious had intended. In the labyrinth, I had no logic to fall back on, no rules to abide. But I felt the numbing cold in my fingertips, felt the vicious wind batter my face, felt the exhaustion in my arms as I carried that heavy stone. And I felt relief when I let it go.  She smiled, surely having heard this question more than once.  Eden specifically remembered the blind woman in the leg brace. As fellow participants of Camp Mabon, they hiked the trails together while Eden served as her guide. She narrated the environment, helping sidestep stones and large roots. On one of the hikes, the woman’s brace broke, and Eden and the staff fashioned an improvised splint using a flannel shirt, duct tape, and trowel. “She wanted to do it,” said Eden. “She just needed a little bit of help.” “How do you describe the power that is felt between a group of women who have all experienced trauma but never speak about it to each other?” asked Eden. “I’m not sure I can.” But participants do not process their trauma during camp — in fact, they are asked not to talk about it. Talk therapy, Zehr said, is extremely helpful and often necessary to conceptualize and understand traumatic experiences. “But, we are not cognitively processing past trauma at our programs. We create a space to remind survivors and their bodies that you are not there anymore, you are here, in the present moment.” And before you dismiss this entire section because you believe you’ve never personally experienced trauma, think again. According to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), over half of all adults and over 60% of men have experienced trauma in their lives. Traumatic events can include rape, domestic abuse, terrorism, war, natural disasters, childhood abuse and neglect, and prison stays. But you may be surprised to find that common life experiences may also be traumatic, like the loss of a loved one (including pets), divorce, illness, and even moving to a new location.  Douthat State ParkPhoto credit: Sarah Vogel “From the neck down.” Eden C. felt a similar sense of surrender by the time she was recommended to Camp Mabon, a retreat for survivors of sexual violence. After escaping her abusive marriage of ten years, she and her four year-old son moved across the country where they didn’t know a soul. She had always been the breadwinner, but holding down a job was out of the question now. Just the sound of the doorbell would set off a panic attack. “I wasn’t just homeless,” she said, “I was hopeless.” People have used drugs to cope with emotional problems since the dawn of drugs. But in the 21st century, one of the cheapest, most accessible drugs is information. And I don’t refer to information as a drug for the sake of hyperbole. Literally, our brains treat it the same as a bump of coke. Both give us a pleasant hit of dopamine, our brain’s way of saying “gimme more.” Douthat State ParkPhoto credit: Sarah Vogel “A lot of people have no idea what ecotherapy means,” she said. “Once, someone asked if it involved doing psychedelics in the woods.” She let out a big, warm laugh. “The answer is no. A lot of people get ecotherapy from things they already do without even realizing it. It’s not a foreign thing, it’s just putting a name on something that has been healing us for thousands of years.” Trauma Trapped in the Body Michele Zehr at her home, where she runs the operations for the Center for Earth-Based HealingPhoto credit: Sarah Vogel To understand how nature heals, Zehr explained, we had to first understand the meaning of trauma. “It means too much, too fast. Anything that overwhelms our nervous systems and our natural capacity to process something and stay regulated is a traumatic experience. Our body remembers those traumas and holds on to them if we are unable to fully process and integrate the traumatic experience in the moment that it happens.”   “We are just animals,” said Zehr. “We are unique animals because we have the capacity to construct buildings, do complex math problems, and write articles. But the shadow side is that we can use these capacities to get around dealing with our stuff. We can dissociate, avoid, suppress. Sometimes we enable avoidance.” New modalities have emerged in the last few decades to address the limitations of talk therapy. Somatic therapy is one such option, proven to be effective in treating anxiety, depression, chronic stress, addiction, and other mental disorders. The goal of a somatic therapist is to help the client identify and release physical tension stored in the body after a traumatic event. Survivors Maybe it was the relief to finally feel what I had been avoiding for so long — the pain of knowing life sucks sometimes and there is absolutely nothing to be done about it. No amount of analysis or preparation would protect me. And yet, somehow, I would still be okay. Appalachian homestead cabin at the Mountain Farm Trail outdoor museum, MP 5.9 on Blue Ridge Parkway. Photo credit: Sarah Vogel Maybe. But for once, I’m going to try to stop putting it into words. Said Zehr, “Mother Nature is trying to show us all the time what we need to do to heal ourselves, but she doesn’t speak in our language. We have to learn how to listen with both our minds and our bodies.” — Since this article was written, the Center for Earth-Based Healing‘s primary source of funding (a federal grant) was discontinued due to a lack of available grant funds. If another reliable and sustainable funding source can not be found in 2020, the Center for Earth-Based Healing will be closing its doors.  Click here to read the whole articlelast_img read more

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Chainstores ill-prepared for internet revolution

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

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Defying EU ultimatum, British MPs approve post-Brexit bill

first_imgPrime Minister Boris Johnson’s government defused a bigger revolt in the Commons after agreeing that parliament, rather than ministers, will have the final say on triggering the treaty-breaking clauses.The EU, however, had insisted that the offending provisions be revoked by Wednesday or it would take Britain to court, noting that the treaty is meant to guarantee a say for the bloc over future trade between Northern Ireland and EU member Ireland.The legislative tussle loomed as British and EU negotiators launched their last week of intense discussions ahead of a summit on October 16, where EU leaders will decide whether it is still worth pursuing a trade deal with London.Despite the economic carnage inflicted by the coronavirus pandemic, Johnson insists the UK is ready to go its own way if necessary after a transition period ends in December, nearly a year after Britain formally left the EU in the wake of a historic referendum. British lawmakers on Tuesday adopted a bill to regulate the UK’s internal market after Brexit, defying a looming EU ultimatum as the two sides entered a final week of tense talks.Despite deep disquiet even from some members of the ruling Conservatives, the House of Commons passed the bill by 340 votes to 256.Senior minister Michael Gove said the bill was “vitally important” to ensure smooth trade among the UK’s four constituent nations, dismissing vociferous objections from Scottish pro-independence MPs as “stories to scare children at bedtime”. The government rejected warnings that the bill could imperil peace in Northern Ireland after US President Donald Trump’s special envoy, Mick Mulvaney, conceded that it could leave the province’s Good Friday Agreement “at risk”.For the main opposition Labor party, business spokesman Ed Miliband said that “when even the Trump administration” speaks out to defend international law, “you know you are in trouble”.The legislation now passes to the upper House of Lords, where it faces opposition after the government admitted that key clauses will violate Britain’s EU divorce treaty, by unilaterally imposing post-Brexit controls on Northern Ireland.But it is still expected to become law in the coming weeks.center_img ‘Untold damage’ In Brussels, the negotiators are battling over the thorny issues that have deadlocked talks since March, including rules for paying state subsidies to private companies and distribution of fishing rights.Failure to reach a deal would put EU and UK relations on minimum standards set by the World Trade Organization and cause a severe shock to their interdependent economies.According to European diplomats, Britain is pushing to intensify negotiations and enter a final phase known as the “tunnel” — in which all communication outside the negotiation room is strictly curtailed.But the EU is so far refusing the invitation, insisting that Britain first budge on the key issues.”First, the UK should show some leg on the state aid, governance and fish,” an EU diplomat told AFP.European Commission chief Ursula von der Leyen on Monday insisted that a deal was still possible and that failure to unblock the talks would be bad for both Britain and Europe.The trade talks have continued despite Britain refusing to back down on its internal market bill, which overrides parts of the Brexit treaty that Johnson struck with the EU last year.Johnson’s predecessor as prime minister, Theresa May, and former finance minister Sajid Javid were among Conservative MPs who had vowed to vote against the bill.May said the bill would “lead to untold damage to the UK’s reputation and put its future at risk”.But Johnson argues the bill is only intended as a “safety net” against purported EU threats to impose tariffs on UK internal trade and even stop food going from mainland Britain to Northern Ireland.As the vote loomed in London, an EU spokeswoman said Brussels would respond “in the next few days”.Topics :last_img read more

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Gold Coast house has a claw-foot bath in its backyard

first_imgThe house has been partially renovated. RE/MAX Regency agent Charl Louw, who is marketing the property with Augusta Swayn, said the bathtub was purchased to be used in the renovation. But after not being able to complete the updates, the owner placed it in the backyard as a quirky, last minute addition. “It was an impromptu decision,” Mr Louw said. “He bought that for the second bathroom but time hasn’t been on their side.“It’s there as a piece, the next owners can use it there and connect it or use it in the bathroom if they convert it.” Mr Louw said the renovations had been completed except for the second bathroom, where the bath would have gone. “He converted a three bedroom, one bathroom to a five-bedroom house with a new kitchen and impressive outside area — it’s a real stunner in Mudgeeraba.” Brick features walls are on show throughout. The claw-foot bathtub standing in all its glory. Buyers keen to bathe in their backyard surrounded by nature need look no further than this recently renovated Mudgeeraba property. The five-bedroom house at 168 Wallandra Rd has a large yard with a covered entertainment area and plenty of grass, plus the freestanding bathtub in the middle. Unfortunately the bath isn’t connected to water, so filling it up might take a while but could prove handy for a number of things — an ice bucket when hosting guests or a spot to wash the dog, maybe? More from news02:37International architect Desmond Brooks selling luxury beach villa11 hours ago02:37Gold Coast property: Sovereign Islands mega mansion hits market with $16m price tag2 days ago MORE NEWS: Almost 40,000 Gold Coast tenants are struggling to pay rent MORE NEWS: SA hotelier couple sell Gold Coast mansion in multimillion-dollar deal Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayNext playlist itemMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 1:02Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -1:02 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedQuality Levels720p720pHD576p576p360p360p270p270pAutoA, selectedAudio Tracken (Main), selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.This is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xFullscreenAndrew Winter: How to flaunt your Unique Selling Point01:02center_img 168 Wallandra Rd, Mudgeeraba, has a unique addition to its backyard. Give me a home among the gumtrees, with lots of plum trees, a sheep or two, a kangaroo, a bathtub out the back.Australia’s classic song Home Among the Gum Trees might need a lyric update to include ‘a bathtub out the back’ as one house on the market offers just that. A classic claw-foot bath isn’t an uncommon item to be found in the bathroom of houses across Australia, or even the world. But it’s not usually something found in the backyard. It has a $549,000-$599,000 price tag. The renovations included stylish industrial-style updates with red brick feature walls, timber accents and a modern kitchen. It is on the market with a $549,000-$599,000 price guide.last_img read more

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Cricket News Aussies might get a bit of stick on sandpapergate by the crowd: Joe Denly

first_imghighlights Steve Smith and David Warner were banned for one year.The ball-tampering scandal took place on March 2018.Cameron Bancroft was handed a nine-month ban. New Delhi: The Ashes 2019 series is all set to begin from August 1 and there is plenty at stake for both teams. England, fresh from World Cup success, will be determined to get the better of Australia and win the Ashes to sign their golden summer off on a high. Australia, on the other hand, will be determined to break their 18-year jinx in England and win a series for the first time since 2001. The Australian side will see the presence of Steve Smith, David Warner and Cameron Bancroft for the first time in more than a year. However, the presence of the trio will give ample ammunition to the England crowd to go after the trio, who were banned for one year due to their involvement in the ball-tampering scandal during the Cape Town Test against South Africa in March 2018. Speaking about whether the crowd will give the Australian team a tough time, England all-rounder Joe Denly, who will bat at the No.4 position in the first Test in Edgbaston remarked that the Australians might get a stick from the crowd for sandpapergate. “If it was the other way around and we were going out to Australia, I’m pretty sure we would hear a lot about it. What the crowd decides to do I don’t know. I’m sure the Aussies might hear a little bit about sandpaper-gate throughout the series. I can’t really comment on how [the crowd] will be feeling but after a few beers I’m sure the Aussies might get a bit of stick,” Denly said in the pre-match press conference before the first Test. Smith, Warner and Bancroft were all involved in the ball-tampering scandal which shattered Australia’s reputation during the Newlands Test in Cape Town in March 2018. Bancroft was spotted removing yellow sandpaper from his trousers in order to tamper with the ball. Smith pleaded guilty and Warner was also implicated in the scandal. Cricket Australia decided to ban Smith and Warner for one year while Bancroft was handed a nine-month ban. Smith has been handed a captaincy ban till 2020 while Warner has been barred permanently from ever leading any Australian side.Also Read | England captain Joe Root returns to No. 3 spot for Ashes openerDenly said he did not want to put too much pressure on himself and said the Ashes challenge was a tough one. “There’s no doubt the Australian bowling line-up is one of the best in the world and, as a top-order batter, that is where you want to be, testing yourself against the best. But I learned from when I previously played for England, I put too much pressure on myself. Getting back in the England team is certainly not something I’ve been focusing on recently. So playing in an Ashes series, for me it’s just about enjoying my cricket and scoring lots of runs for Kent and seeing where it takes me,” Denly added.center_img For all the Latest Sports News News, Cricket News News, Download News Nation Android and iOS Mobile Apps.last_img read more

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