Red Hot Chili Peppers Announce Egypt Show At The Great Pyramids Of Giza

first_imgToday, the Red Hot Chili Peppers announced they will play a show at The Great Pyramid in Giza, Egypt on March 15th, 2019. Tickets go on sale this Friday, January 18th at 8 a.m. local time here.In September of 1978, the Grateful Dead traveled to Egypt and played three shows at The Great Pyramids of Giza, cementing the venue as one of the most legendary in the world. You can watch a free webcast of the show below:Red Hot Chili Peppers – Live at the Pyramids – Free Webcast[Video: Red Hot Chili Peppers/Nugs.tv]The Chili Peppers are gearing up for their only other scheduled performances of 2019, in Australia and New Zealand this February and March, in support of their 2016 studio album, The Getaway. The band’s drummer, Chad Smith, recently lent a helping hand as part of Will Farrell‘s “Best Night Of Your Life” benefit concert along with Jerry Seinfeld, Duff McKagan, and Brad Paisley at Hollywood’s Greek Theatre back in early October.For ticketing information and a full list of the Red Hot Chili Peppers’ upcoming tour dates, head to the band’s website.last_img read more

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Advice for ‘the opposite of underdogs’

first_img <a href=”https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L3gEd2JQtRo” rel=”nofollow” target=”_blank”> <img src=”https://img.youtube.com/vi/L3gEd2JQtRo/0.jpg” alt=”0″ title=”How To Choose The Correct Channel Type For Your Video Content ” /> </a> “As you embark on your real-world journey and leave behind the ivy-covered, serial, stock dorms of Harvard, I do feel it’s my responsibility to tell you something meaningful, something that will not only inspire you but also arm you with a key to unlocking future opportunities,” comedic actress and writer Rashida Jones ’97 told members of the Class of 2016 as they basked with families and friends in a gloriously sunny Tercentenary Theatre this afternoon.“As Harvard graduates, this Commencement is literally the only time anyone will be rooting for your success. America loves an underdog, and you are not underdogs. You are now the opposite of underdogs.”Tongue firmly in cheek, Jones joked about her college days rife with hangovers and hookups and lovingly mocked the students for not going to Stanford as “idiots” who “actually chose” to graduate.“No one successful graduated from Harvard! Matt Damon. William Randolph Hearst. Bonnie Raitt. Bill Gates. Mark Zuckerburg: dropouts! Can you name anyone cool who graduated from Harvard? No! I looked it up, and there’s not a single example of a successful person who graduated from Harvard,” she quipped.Class Day Exercises featured Class Day Speaker, Rashida Jones ’97, center, leaving University Hall and heading to Tercentenary Theatre at Harvard University. On left, is Ezra Koenig, singer, songwriter and lead vocalist in the band Vampire Weekend. Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff PhotographerWhile an undergrad, Jones studied comparative religion and resided in Eliot House. She was active in the College’s arts and cultural scene as a member of the Harvard-Radcliffe Dramatic Club, Signet Society, and the Harvard Black Students Association. She also served as musical director of the co-ed a cappella group the Harvard Opportunes and was a member of the Hasty Pudding Club and Hasty Pudding Theatricals, co-writing the music for the group’s 149th annual production, “Me and My Galaxy.”Since graduating, Jones has appeared in many of this era’s signature quirky, smart TV comedies such as “Parks and Recreation,” “The Office,” and “Freaks and Geeks,” and in 20 films, including “I Love You, Man” and “The Social Network.” She currently stars in “Angie Tribeca,” a police detective spoof co-produced by “The Office” star Steve Carell. In addition to work as a screenwriter (the upcoming “Toy Story 4,” 2012’s “Celeste and Jesse Forever”), Jones also has stealth musical talent, singing background vocals for Maroon 5 and performing songs about Thanksgiving on “The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon.”Beyond the laughs, she imparted three genuine bits of wisdom she hoped would help to “stave off” any future midlife crises: “Don’t count on the system; protect your instinct to care; and choose love.”As a fellow “rule follower,” Jones relayed her own difficulties trying to make it as an actress and budding screenwriter in show business and how it was only after going outside the system and launching her own independently financed productions that she found lasting success and fulfillment. And while doing what’s required, following the rules, or waiting to be recognized by others might have been good strategies in high school and even college, it won’t deliver a satisfying adult life because “the hard fact is this: The real world doesn’t reward rule followers … and the real world is not always merit-based.“Outside of what’s expected from you, what path do you really want to take in life? What are you prepared to tolerate to realize that path? Or are you waiting for someone else to define that path for you?” Jones asked the audience. “I spent my younger years hoping and praying that someone would give me a break, that someone more successful and knowledgeable than I would show me the way and save me from making mistakes,” but none ever had the answer.“Here’s the simple truth: You are the only one who can create the life you want, and you may have to break some rules to do that.”Andrea Ortiz ’16 (from left) gives Allison Torsiglieri, and Gabrielle Milner the Ames Award with the help of Jennifer Jia-Hong Liu ’16 during Senior Class Day Exercises in the Tercentenary Theatre. Kris Snibbe/Harvard Staff PhotographerJones, 40, has never fit predictably into anyone’s neat little boxes. Some might not expect that the privileged daughter of celebrities (Actress Peggy Lipton is her mother, and legendary music producer, film composer, and arranger Quincy Jones, Mus. D. ’97, is her father) who was raised in tony Bel Air, Calif. (where Michael Jackson was a close family friend), and who went to school with Kim Kardashian and Paris Hilton would turn out to be a self-described “chubby nerd” from the high school math team who was following her lifelong dream to attend Harvard College and become a doctor, a lawyer, or maybe even president.Biracial and raised Jewish, Jones has spoken candidly over the years about the difficulties she has encountered dealing with those who want her to live up to their preconceived notions of race, gender, and sexuality. As a teenager, she publicly slammed rapper Tupac Shakur for his criticism of her and her father’s interracial relationships. (She later become friends with Shakur and wrote a paper about him at Harvard.) Jones has also talked about how difficult it was to find acceptance among some black student groups as an undergraduate, and then later in Hollywood as a beautiful and funny woman of color working in comedies with predominantly white casts and writers.During her speech, Jones also challenged graduates to have compassion and to avoid the toxicity of indifference that can come with the information overload of the modern, atomized world.“In the face of all that noise, it’s harder than ever to stay committed to do the things you really care about. But don’t be distracted. Do not be dissuaded. Do not be discouraged. Keep caring. It’s not enough to talk among your friends about the problems you see in the world,” she said. “As a college-educated, worldly young person, you are obligated to be loud, to rise above the fear mongering and bigotry and misinformation, to make yourself heard through all the noise. There’s too much to fight for.”Lastly, drawing on advice from her father (they are now the only parent and child to deliver Class Day speeches), Jones urged students to “choose love,” even when it feels scary.Jones speaks during Senior Class Day Exercises in the Tercentenary Theatre. Kris Snibbe/Harvard Staff Photographer“When big decisions pop up, get quiet, real quiet, and listen,” she said. “Turn off your phone, turn off your computer, and listen to your true heart. Hear the thing that makes you feel sick with excitement, that scares you because you know you’ll learn. And do that thing.”Class Day speakers are chosen each year by a committee of the College’s seniors. They are typically well-known figures from the arts, politics, journalism, government, or business, and often — but not always — graduates of the College. Past speakers include former President Bill Clinton (2007), baseball legend Hank Aaron (1995), Nobel laureate Mother Teresa (1982), and Coretta Scott King (1968), who spoke in place of her recently slain husband, Martin Luther King Jr.Also as part of Class Day, seniors Gabrielle E. Milner and Allison E. Torsiglieri received the Ames Award. The honor is given annually to students who demonstrate exemplary leadership and passion for helping others without fanfare or acknowledgement. The award is given in memory of Harvard alumni Richard Glover Ames and Henry Russell Ames. The brothers perished while trying to save their father, who had fallen overboard during a storm off the coast of Newfoundland in 1935.Harvard Orators Mariam Jalloul and Min-Woo Park spoke to the class about the Harry Widener Library and the joy in procrastinating, while Aaron Henricks and Christina Teodorescu poked some self-deprecating fun at achievement and post-college ambitions as the Ivy Orators.Rashida Jones: Class Day Speech | Harvard Commencement 2016 Actress and advocate Rashida Jones ’97 addresses graduating seniors at Harvard’s Class Day ceremony on May 25, 2016 at Tercentenary Theatre.last_img read more

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Campus groups seek Trump petition updates

first_imgTags: College Democrats, Commencement 2017, Commencement petition, diversity council, Donald Trump, Fr. John Jenkins More than a month after they submitted a petition asking University President Fr. John Jenkins not to invite President Trump to speak at this year’s Commencement, the Notre Dame College Democrats and Diversity Council are still waiting for an answer.Senior co-president of College Democrats Andrew Galo said the petition had roughly 3,600 signatures when it was delivered to Jenkins in December. Galo said the petition’s goal was only further reinforced with the new executive order Trump signed Friday, banning  travel from seven Muslim-majority countries.“Fr. Jenkins has already called on the President to rescind this hateful, bigoted and misguided order,” Galo said in an email. “We agree, and we hope Fr. Jenkins goes one step further in choosing a different Commencement speaker. We will certainly be more vocal until a decision is made.”Jenkins issued a statement Sunday urging Trump to rescind Friday’s executive order, which stopped visas from being issued to nationals of Iran, Iraq, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen for 90 days, and to refugees of Syria indefinitely. It also banned all refugee entries for 120 days, required a review of visa adjudication processes and stipulated refugees can be admitted on a case-by-case basis, especially if they are religious minorities. Senior Rachel Wallace, who is student union representative for Diversity Council, said at this point, she thinks it is unlikely for Jenkins to invite Trump. “A lot of the orders he’s signed, particularly this last one … [are] so against what Notre Dame stands for,” Wallace said. “The strongest point of content in our petition wasn’t necessarily that he goes against Catholic values — we were really focusing on student safety and inclusivity.”In the past, six presidents of the United States have spoken at Commencement during their terms, with four of them speaking at the first Commencement after their inauguration. Jenkins said he was undecided in continuing this tradition and extending the invitation to Trump in an interview with The Observer on Dec. 2, before the executive order was issued.Galo said neither Jenkins nor his staff have reached out to comment on the petition. However, he said, they have heard from students, alumni and community members who share the same views.Wallace said since the petition was submitted to Jenkins in December, she figured there was a slim chance of them getting a response before break. However, she said, she did expect that by now it would have been addressed, and although it hasn’t, she still remains hopeful for a response.“We are looking to do some kind of follow-up, whether it’s … a letter … or if it’s more of an action,” Wallace said. “We’ve just been focusing on that whoever the speaker is … they represent our values and that our students feel included. … We want a confirmation that he’s not our speaker, and we can move forward from there.”last_img read more

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2021 Budget Passed By County Legislature, Tax Rate Increased

first_imgShare:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) WNY News Now File Image.MAYVILLE — The Chautauqua County Legislature passed the 2021 county budget with an increase of five-cents per thousand in the full-value tax rate.Lawmakers voiced concerns that the current COVID-19 pandemic has created a great deal of uncertainty regarding revenue and the budget process.Under the approved budget the full value tax rate will increase to $8.51 per thousand under the spending plan, an increase from $8.46.When preparing the budget, County Executive P.J. Wendel said the plan reflected the impact and realities of COVID-19. The budget he proposed reflects “the efforts made by the COVID-19 Finance team, department heads and county employees to help keep this year’s budget in line and to better prepare us for next year,” Wendel said.last_img read more

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Genetics key in crop research

first_img“The world population is continuing to grow exponentially. In order to be able to feed the world in 2050 we’re going to have to produce a lot more food on the same amount of land,” Ozias-Akins said. “For all crops, we need to be looking at ways to very rapidly increase productivity. A large part of that will probably be through genetic gains.”Genetic resistance to pests and diseases will reduce chemical inputs needed for control, resulting in a safer environment and reduction of costs to the grower, she said.According to the Georgia Peanut Commission, Georgia produces almost half of the United States’ peanut crop.For more on the Georgia peanut crop, see the Web site www.caes.uga.edu/commodities/fieldcrops/peanuts/. Nematode-resistance is a valuable trait for peanut plants because nematodes have a devastating effect the plants. Plants that are infected by the harmful roundworms will not produce adequate seeds. This results in stunting and eventually low yields.Ozias-Akins has been working on this project for the past decade. Peanuts are one of the last major crops to have their genome sequenced (process used to determine the presence and the order of all the base pairs of DNA). The first plant that was successfully sequenced was Arabidopsis, a plant in the Brassicaceae family, related to broccoli and cabbage. Given its small genome size, Arabidopsis has less DNA and was easier and cheaper to sequence. More recently, the Maize (corn) genome was sequenced. It’s one of the larger plant genomes to be sequenced and is comparable in size to humans.In the last couple of years, the soybean genome was successfully sequenced. Piecing together the peanut genome project hasn’t progressed as rapidly as those crops, due in part to the crop’s lesser importance on the world stage, compared to soybeans and maize, Ozias-Akins said. As seen with nematode resistance, though, molecular breeding could play a key role in the future of peanuts. Between high volumes of irrigation and frequent pesticides use, farming peanuts can be a costly endeavor. Peggy Ozias-Akins believes peanut breeding is a tool that can help thwart high-priced threats to Georgia’s peanut crop. It’s already aided producers in fighting nematodes.“Crop improvement through breeding is one of the ultimate goals (for crop production). Traditional breeding now can be facilitated by molecular genetics. The more we know about how the DNA sequence is actually related to the different traits that are expressed in the crop, then we can proceed with breeding at a greater pace,” said Ozias-Akins, a professor with the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences on the Tifton Campus. Ozias-Akins uses molecular markers that are associated with particular crop traits. last_img read more

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A Bar Where Everyone Gets Along: Catawba and Microbrew Madness

first_imgThe BRO MicroBrew Madness is pitting the best craft breweries in the South against each other in a March Madness style bracket that has neighbors against neighbors, Davids matching up with Goliaths, IPA’s versus IPA’s…It’s a veritable fight to the death. A bloody cage match where only the mightiest beer will be left standing, towering above slain pale ales and porters.Okay, most of that fierce competition is going on in my head. The fact is, craft brewing is one of the friendliest businesses I’ve ever witnessed, particularly on a local and regional level. What other business could a small start up call the company who dominates the market and ask for advice? What other business do you see cross-company collaborations. Sierra Nevada invites other breweries, small and large, to brew at their facilities in California every year. Terrapin is known for whipping up some ridiculously creative collaboration brews with other Southern breweries. I can’t remember the last time McDonalds collaborated with Burger King to offer a special sandwich.I recently went to the opening of the Catawba Brewing Company’s new tasting room here in Asheville, and half the people in the room were representatives of some sort from other breweries here in town. And they were all genuinely happy to have Catawba open up shop on their home turf.Are these breweries competitive with each other? Of course. I have no doubt that every master brewer is trying to one up his neighbor brewer with off the wall experimental batches of craziness. Sure, the breweries push each other, which is why America has become ground zero for good beer in the last decade. But it’s a friendly push. A soft nudge. Like how you push your riding buddy to go over that kicker that both of you know he shouldn’t go over.I like brackets like this Microbrew Madness. It gives brewers a chance to go head to head and work out some of that competitive spirit in a friendly way. I’d also like to see a brewery-only basketball league, where each brewery fields a team, and head brewers try to create a super-hydrating beer that doesn’t cause everyone to throw up after running crazy on the court for 20 minutes. Elbows would be thrown, fouls would be called, but after the game, they’d all go back to being friends and frenemies, gently pushing each other to be better.Visit the Microbrew Madness tourney brackets here.last_img read more

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Brazil, Colombia to work jointly on regional stability

first_img Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos visited Brazil on September 1 to sign agreements with his Brazilian counterpart Luiz Inácio Lula Da Silva, destined to strengthening the overall regional unity and stability. The Colombian leader’s first official visit to the South American giant also included the subscription of an agreement of intent to integrate Colombia in the manufacturing process of the military transport aircraft Embraer KC-390. The agreements also aim to step up cooperation between the two countries in terms of economy, technology, environment and security, reported Xinhua. While announcing, “We are no longer in the region with conflict, rebellion and censorship,” during his speech, President Lula added that Brazil would be in solidarity with Colombia during their struggle for peace. Newly inaugurated President Santos, meanwhile, underlined that the current situation is an opportunity to achieve a “destiny of greatness.” Santos detailed that (current) tensions between Colombia, Venezuela and Ecuador should be eased because as “governments fight, people suffer,” according to Xinhua. Following the meeting, special advisor on Brazil’s international affairs Marco Aurelio Garcia, reiterated that the conflict with the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) was Colombia’s internal issue. “It should be solved by Colombia itself. We will get involved only if the Colombian government requests,” he concluded. By Dialogo September 03, 2010last_img read more

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Bidding war for rare ‘inner-city acreage’ on the Gold Coast

first_img 14 Kingsway Drive, Molendinar. Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayNext playlist itemMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 2:31Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -2:31 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedQuality Levels540p540p360p360p270p270pAutoA, selectedAudio Tracken (Main), selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.This is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xFullscreenIs it a good time to list?02:31A BIDDING war erupted when a rare “inner-city acreage” property went under the hammer last weekend with the buyers splashing $1.23 million to secure their dream home.Auctioneer David Holmes, of Metro Auctions, took the property at 14 Kingsway Drive, Molendinar to auction on Sunday. 14 Kingsway Drive, Molendinar.More from news02:37International architect Desmond Brooks selling luxury beach villa7 hours ago02:37Gold Coast property: Sovereign Islands mega mansion hits market with $16m price tag1 day agoMs Stewart said the buyer was from the Gold Coast and was determined to own the five-bedroom three-bathrom house on 0.5ha property.“There were two bidders who both really wanted the property,” she said. “The buyer said to me (after the auction) that if the other bidder wasn’t bidding she wouldn’t have paid that.” 14 Kingsway Drive, Molendinar. “At $960,000 we stopped for instructions from the owners and the property was called on the market at $1.006 million,” he said.“We continued the bidding in $2500 and $5000 increments all the way until $1.23 million. It was $224,000 since it was announced on the market.” He said feedback from prospective buyers before the auction had been below the $1 million mark. “Feedback was at $850,000 so we ended up with quite an extraordinary result,” he said.Karen Stewart and Edward Smyth of Stewart and Smyth Estate Agents handled the marketing campaign which attracted seven registered bidders. Auctioneer David Holmes of Metro Auctions, took 14 Kingsway Drive, Molendinar to auction on Sunday. 14 Kingsway Drive, Molendinar.Ms Stewart said there were plenty of cash buyers ready to snap up Gold Coast property.“When a rare property comes on the market and it’s a good piece of real estate you will always find competition,” she said.last_img read more

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Three level extension hides behind historic Queenslander

first_img BEFORE: 16 Strath Street, Highgate Hill.Nearly 140 years later, rail lines have expanded and so has the house, but transport solutions for a growing city remain the focus of the current owner.Michael Roth is a passenger and freight transport consultant who has lovingly restored the three-bedroom worker’s cottage and joined it to a three-storey extension that has tripled the house size and added three more bedrooms. BEFORE: The rear sleep-out. AFTER: No longer a sleep-out, this room has become the main bathroom.“This is one of the beauties of Brisbane,” he said.“It’s on top of a hill near South Bank, with views to the east and west and the city. We can see sunrise and sunset from the front veranda and the new deck.”“What we know is that this was one of the three original houses on the street. We know it was built somewhere between 1881 when the land was subdivided and 1883 when it appears in the post office book.”But despite the romance of its origins, the house was rundown when Michael and Susan Roth bought it in 2013.“We rented it out for 18 months while we worked out what to do and then we took the plunge to start the renovation,” he said. BEFORE: The old kitchen was added on to the original building in an extension that was demolished.The design for the extension and renovation was completed in 2015 and then building approvals were sought with construction taking place between 2017 and 2020. “I’ve done about half a dozen renovations but this is the biggest job by far. AFTER: The new kitchen is built in almost the same spot as the old one, as part of the new extension.Mr Roth, who is a mechanical engineer, decided not to go with an architect, choosing to design the house himself in consultation with a building designer and draughtsman. He also had project manager Ben Kelly from Kelly Constructions oversee the build.The house was raised slightly and built in underneath, demolishing a previous extension which had a kitchen and bathroom behind the home. BEFORE: The previous extension. AFTER: The new extension.The original home now has three bedrooms and a lounge upstairs and a guest bedroom with an ensuite, laundry and garage on the ground floor.A front sunroom in the original house has been converted into part of the front veranda and the rear sunroom has become the main bathroom on the first floor. BEFORE: The front enclosed sunroom. AFTER: The front sunroom is now part of the veranda.The extension is barely visible from the front of the 549sq m property and has a self-contained granny flat on the ground level, while the main living, dining and kitchen areas are on the first floor with a rear deck. More from news02:37International architect Desmond Brooks selling luxury beach villa7 hours agoParks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus8 hours ago AFTER: The property’s footprint as it looks today.The second floor is taken up by the master bedroom.Wide blackbutt floorboards have been laid throughout the house to link the old and new sections and instead of building cupboards in the bedrooms, extra storage space has been built into the attic. AFTER: The central stairs and hallway represent the point where the original house meets the new extension. AFTER: Another view of the join between the two buildings, with a pond that features bricks from the existing home.A passive solar design underpins the home with a central corridor that sucks the air from the front to the back of the house, creating a sustained breeze and reducing the need for airconditioning.And wherever possible the couple managed to recycle original materials. “We recycled what we could in terms of some of the wood and the bricks, there was an old chimney that was falling down from 1900 and we took that apart carefully and used all those bricks for the pond that we built and the pathway.” BEFORE AND AFTER: The same aspect as before but the city has changed.But in making a multi-generational home, the couple, whose children have left home, say the house is now too big for their needs so they have put it on the market with Bettina Jude of Belle Property West End. This home at 16 Strath Street, Highgate Hill has undergone a major restoration and extension and is now for sale. Brisbane’s earliest rail lines were being built when a railway surveyor moved in to 16 Strath Street, Highgate Hill. FOLLOW US ON FACEBOOKlast_img read more

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JDR cleared for takeover. Names new CEO

first_imgUmbilical and power cable provider for the offshore energy industry JDR Cable Systems has appointed Richard Turner as its new Chief Executive Officer (CEO) while also receiving regulatory approval for its acquisition by TFKable.The completion of the acquistion by the Polish-based producer of wires and cables TELE-FONIKA Kable (TFKable) is expected within a week pending final legal and administrative proceedings, JDR informed.The approval was supported with the appoitnment of Richard Turner as the new CEO of the company, who will head JDR’s leadership team alongside the company’s longstanding Chief Technology Officer, James Young.Both will join the JDR board along with TFKable Group’s board of directors, according to JDR.Commenting on his appointment, Turner said: “The opportunities for JDR from this acquisition are exciting, particularly in continuing to provide innovative products and services. JDR has ambitious plans for the future. Becoming part of the great trade organisation that is TFKable Group is a vital next step for JDR in achieving its aspirations.”JDR’s current CEO, David Currie, and Ivan Coyard, currently Chief Financial Officer, will be taking up new roles as Executive Advisers to the new JDR Board, the company said.As a result of the acquisition, TFKable Group will now employ nearly 4,000 people worldwide, according to JDR.TFKable said earlier it planned to maintain JDR’s operations in current locations, including its two production sites in Hartlepool and Littleport, and other UK offices, to provide new opportunities for the local employees and business partners.The transaction has been funded through TFKable Group’s own resources as well as the financial support of a six-bank consortium.last_img read more

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