Hollywood Vampires Announce Spring 2019 Tour Dates

first_imgHollywood Vampires is back with their first announced batch of shows for 2019. The rock supergroup, comprised mainly of Aerosmith‘s Joe Perry, Alice Cooper, and actor-turned-rocker Johnny Depp, will head out on a brief run of performances this spring scheduled to begin on May 10th in Las Vegas.The upcoming run will take the band to a mix of venues/cities along the western U.S throughout the month of May including The Joint in Las Vegas, NV (5/10); The Greek in Los Angeles, CA (5/11); the Warfield Theatre in San Francisco, CA (5/12); The Fillmore in Denver, CO (5/14); Sandia Casino in Albuquerque, NM (5/16); Talking Stick Casino in Scottsdale, AZ (5/17); and Fantasy Springs Casino in Indio, CA on 5/18.Related: Aerosmith’s Joe Perry Previews New Line Of Gibson Les Paul GuitarsNews of the supergroup’s upcoming spring tour comes a week after Aerosmith announced their plans to bring their Las Vegas residency to the east coast for a run of dates come August. Joe Perry was supposed to perform a run of solo shows this past November and December but was forced to cancel all of the shows on the early winter run after being hospitalized following a Billy Joel concert in New York City just a few weeks prior to the start of the tour. Alice Cooper also announced an upcoming run of summer tour dates alongside Halestorm on Monday.Tickets for the May Hollywood Vampires concerts will go on sale to the public starting this Friday, March 8th, at 10 a.m. Local. Fans can head to the band’s website for tickets and tour info.Hollywood Vampires 2019 Tour DatesMay 10 – The Joint – Las Vegas, NVMay 11 – The Greek – Los Angeles, CAMay 12 – Warfield Theatre – San Francisco, CAMay 14 – The Fillmore – Denver, COMay 16 – Sandia Casino – Albuquerque, NMMay 17 – Talking Stick Casino – Scottsdale, AZMay 18 – Fantasy Springs Casino – Indio, CAView Hollywood Vampires 2019 Tour Dateslast_img read more

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Villa I Tatti accepting applications for Graduate Fellowships

first_imgTwo Graduate Fellowships are available for Harvard Ph.D. students each fall and spring semester at Villa I Tatti. The primary goal is to allow students working on their dissertation or selecting their topics to read widely in Renaissance sources and secondary literature, and to see objects related to their studies.I Tatti offers its Fellows the precious time they need to pursue their research with a minimum of obligations and interruptions together with a maximum of scholarly resources—a combination that distinguishes the Harvard Center from similar institutions. In order to foster a collaborative spirit, Fellows are expected to live in the Florence area and to spend at least three days a week at the center. Lunch and tea are served each weekday, and the I Tatti community takes shape over these convivial occasions. Each year, a limited number of activities organized at I Tatti are reserved for the Fellows, and they join the wider community at conferences, lectures, and concerts. Read Full Storylast_img read more

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Tix Now On Sale to See Chita Rivera Return to B’way in The Visit

first_img John Kander and Fred Ebb’s The Visit is based on the classic Friedrich Dürrenmatt play (adapted by Maurice Valency) and features a book by Terrence McNally, with music by Kander and lyrics by Ebb. Claire Zachanassian is an often-widowed millionairess who pays a visit to her hardship-stricken birthplace. The locals hope she’ll bring them a new lease on life, but little do they know her offer to revitalize the town comes at a dreadful price. View Comments The Visit Show Closed This production ended its run on June 14, 2015 Tickets are now available to see the legendary two-time Tony winner Chita Rivera and Tony winner Roger Rees in The Visit on Broadway. Directed by John Doyle and choreographed by Graciela Daniele, the musical will begin previews on March 26 at the Lyceum Theatre. Opening night is set for April 23. Related Shows The production will also feature Jason Danieley, Matthew Deming, Diana Dimarzio, David Garrison, Rick Holmes, Tom Nelis, Chris Newcomer, Aaron Ramey, Timothy Shew and Michelle Veintimilla.last_img read more

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BP, Shell shield renewable spending while coping with oil price crash

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Greentech Media:Shell just did the thing CEO Ben van Beurden said no leader of the company would ever want on their record: cut its shareholder dividend for the first time since World War II.In slashing Shell’s dividend on Thursday from 47 to 16 cents per share, van Beurden made a dramatic statement on the global oil industry’s current predicament. But what the supermajor and its peer BP are not cutting is also very telling.Both BP and Shell released their earnings results this week, their first since the oil price crash and the emergence of the coronavirus pandemic — and since declaring their own net-zero ambitions. Despite the chaos in global oil markets, the pair of supermajors have committed to maintaining their low-carbon investment plans and spoken of an accelerating energy transition.A quarter of Shell’s planned $5 billion of capex savings will come from its integrated gas and new energies business unit, which is home to its renewable energy ventures. But van Beurden said Thursday that the new energies businesses would be mostly untouched. “I wouldn’t say we have ring-fenced them; that would be too much,” he told reporters. “[But] there is an energy transition underway that may even pick up speed in the recovery phase of the crisis, and we want to be well-positioned for it.”Meanwhile, BP’s new CEO Bernard Looney said his firm has not shrunk its pot of money for energy transition investments this year. “We’ve left our $500 million of low-carbon investment unchanged [and] untouched this year,” Looney told investors on a Tuesday call. “Where we cut elsewhere, we did not cut that back. So we will, over time, be working hard to do more in that space.”Looney said BP’s resolve to execute on the net-zero strategy it announced in February has only become “stronger” in the face of the multiple crises facing the sector. “We talked a lot about the negative prices for WTI [West Texas Intermediate, a light sweet crude oil blend] just a few weeks ago. At the same time as that was happening, Lightsource BP was doing 400 megawatts of solar contracts in the U.S.,” Looney said. “That sector continues to attract investment. It attracts investments because of its risk profile and its resilience.”[John Parnell]More: Shell and BP slash spending but renewables largely spared BP, Shell shield renewable spending while coping with oil price crashlast_img read more

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Riding Like a Swamp Fox

first_imgI called the forest service info line, hoping to check conditions. A guy at Seewee Visitor Center said he’d checked for updates this morning. I gave the trail a few days to dry out and went back to reading about the revolution. For two years in the early 1780s, Francis Marion led a small volunteer militia in a guerilla campaign against much larger British forces. Marion relied upon local intelligence, creative thinking, and covert ambushes. They burst from the forests and freed captured Americans, disrupted British supply lines, and won countless skirmishes against enemy patrols. Then they retreated into the swamps and hid. During one unsuccessful pursuit, according to Simms, British adversary Colonel Tarleton coined a nickname. Without any major battles, Marion’s so-called “Brigade” fought the British Army and Loyalists to a prolonged draw. This kept them engaged in South Carolina and unable to reinforce their northern forces, allowing George Washington’s Continental Army to win the war in the north. Even today, historians credit Francis Marion—a 5’2” 100-pound militia leader who limped with a crutch, disliked direct conflict, and slept in swamps—with saving the American Revolution. During a rowdy officer’s party, the drunken host locked the door so no one could leave until everyone got smashed. Since Marion didn’t drink, he supposedly took the advice literally and jumped out a second-story window. He broke his ankle upon landing and was evacuated from the city with those unfit for duty. By early 1780, Charleston was captured by the British, whose forces soon occupied the entire state. Meanwhile, a recovering Marion was limping between hiding spots in the swampy region that became the national forest—a situation which led to Marion organizing a ragtag militia as a last hope for rebellion in the Low Country. Two days later, I parked at Witherbee trailhead and rode into the central forest. After seven miles of puddle-pocked straightaways, the trail dropped into a sunken bog near Turkey Creek. It was 10 miles of slogging from there. We’re talking standing water and thick mud. Brief pockets of spongey spoil atop high ground felt like pavement. I was relieved to have my fat bike—occasionally, I went off-trail through the forest. I crossed creeks and swamps on elevated beams and logs, walking some, riding others, and falling off more than enough. A few makeshift causeways sunk below water level from my passing weight. After four days, I returned with bike to the swamps. Driving to the Lake Moultrie trailhead, something was amiss. It hadn’t rained in a week, but the Santee River was flooding, and water was ponding in meadows. I’m new to this area, and I suspected I’d made a critical mistake.  It wasn’t love at first sight with the Swamp Fox Passage. The first time I stepped foot on the Palmetto Trail in Francis Marion National Forest, I was chased to my vehicle by a cloud of mosquitos. Half joined me inside for a slap-happy bloodletting—I mean getaway—along US-17. “After the first frost,” suggested the attendant at Steed Creek Ranger Station. It was almost November, but a hot October had kept biting insects at summer levels. Before my final ride, I re-watched the 2000 film “The Patriot.” Mel Gibson’s character Benjamin Martin is loosely—loosely—based upon Marion. Not including the double-fisting muskets and ax-throwing parts. The Swamp Fox had defeated me. For now. Fifteen miles of trail were under water. But unlike the British Empire, I’d be back. “The trail is good to go,” he said. “No flooding.” For a Saturday, there weren’t many people. A few hikers, including one sunburned retiree wearing nothing but a black speedo. He kindly re-tucked all items as I rode past. I saw one horse-riding group. A church group near one of several trailside camps. I met mother and son backpackers, with the elder encouraging the younger, who was training for the Appalachian Trail. Out of curiosity, I called the visitor center. The guy said he checked for updates that morning. No flooding on the trail. But my soaked shoes told a different story. I later found out, there are never any updates for the Swamp Fox Passage. Thus, proceed cautiously. Ride between the first frost of fall and just after the final frost of spring. Avoid when the Santee River is flooding.  While planning the longer trip, I started reading about the forest’s namesake Francis Marion. He was a Revolutionary War hero whose exploits were far more unconventional than odd desires to mountain bike through a swamp.center_img Temps came down during the next month, but my wife and I had trips planned through December. We returned in January for a short day-ride on the adjacent Awendaw Passage. It’s a scenic bluff-top trail above a creek, which starts at the Intracoastal Waterway and ends seven miles later at the US-17 trailhead. The ride was mostly flat, muddy in spots, and semi-buggy, yet intriguingly scenic through matchstick pine forest and blackwater wetlands. This convinced me to give the 47-mile Swamp Fox Passage another try. A cyclist explores the 47-mile Swamp Fox Passage in South Carolina. Photo by Mike Bezemek Reaching Steed Creek Road wearing soggy shoes and half the swamp, I returned on the network of sandy roads. While navigating this workaround, I discovered that palmettoconservation.org’s maps excellently delineate the trail, but the roads are off. The forest service’s 2012 revised topo map is better with roads, less precise for trails. As a backup, most parts of the forest have data service. The scenic Francis Marion National Forest features matchstick pine forests and blackwater wetlands. Photo by Mike Bezemek Biking Through the Francis Marion National Forest in South Carolina “This damned Swamp Fox, the devil himself could not catch him.” In the late 1770s, the thirteen states were fighting for independence against the British Empire, and Francis Marion was a lieutenant colonel in the Continental Army. After reaching a stalemate in the North, the British shifted their strategy to capturing the South. In 1779, the British fleet was preparing to invade Georgia and South Carolina. One target was Charleston, where Marion was stationed. The Swamp Fox Passage runs through the heart of the national forest. Initially, I considered bike-packing the 47 miles as an overnight, but, like Marion, I sometimes leap before looking. Finding little information, I decided to reconnoiter the passage with three out-and-back day rides. I targeted early February. Of course, just days before starting, a massive storm swept up from the Gulf. Luckily, it skirted inland, dropping only 1.5 inches of rain on the forest. The next morning, I rode away from US-17 on a bed of longleaf pine needles. It was cold and gray, but otherwise a great day. This 13-mile segment of the trail was mostly a single or double track elevated atop old logging traces. The surface was typically packed soil and sand, often with roots, sometimes grass, and mostly dry with occasional puddles. I pedaled through pine forests and cypress swamps, crossed narrow bridges over tidal blackwater creeks. Reaching my turnaround, I rode through a few inches of water near Steed Creek Road. An ominous sign, which I forgot while returning to my truck. Driving home, I called my Chattanooga buddy.  “I think I found a mellow, winter-weekend bike-packing route.” Sure enough, the trail was flooded. The storm eight days before had dumped further inland. With the region being so flat, it took a week to reach a saturated Low Country. Not wanting to surrender, I rode about a mile. Well, more like waded. last_img read more

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Law Day reception set for Tallahassee

first_imgLaw Day reception set for Tallahassee April 15, 2004 Regular News Law Day reception set for Tallahassee On May 4 the Legal Services of North Florida, the Legal Aid Foundation of the Tallahassee Bar Association, The Capital City Bar Presidents Council, and the Florida State law school will celebrate Law Day with a reception and dinner at the Booster’s Skybox and the University Club at Doak Campbell Stadium.The 5-7 p.m. reception, followed by dinner, will be an opportunity to recognize all volunteer attorneys, and Bob Cohen, the recipient of The Florida Bar President’s Pro Bono Service Award for the Second Judicial Circuit.Bar President-elect Kelly Overstreet Johnson will address the gathering.The Capital City Bar Presidents Council will also present its fourth Richard W. Ervin Equal Justice Award. The reception is open to the public with the recognition program beginning at 6:15 p.m.For dinner, tickets are available in advance only until April 23, send by mail $35 per person by check to the Tallahassee Bar Association at P.O. Box 813, Tallahassee, FL 32302.last_img read more

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Kids, funding, and diversity accent McGrane’s year

first_img Kids, funding, and diversity accent McGrane’s year Jan Pudlow Associate Editor Dedicating his term as Florida Bar president “For the Children,” Miles McGrane challenged lawyers to take up the cause.“I am proud to say that you not only accepted this challenge, but you made this issue your own,” McGrane told those gathered at General Assembly in his state of the Bar address.Not only did lawyers contribute $45 to The Florida Bar Foundation to the Lawyers Challenge for Children in “unprecedented amounts” totaling more than $190,000, but the Board of Governors lent support by establishing a standing committee on the Legal Needs of Children to continue the work of the three-year commission chaired by 11th Circuit Judge Sandy Karlan.Lawyers lined up to represent a child pro bono. For those lawyers inexperienced on how best to represent a child in dependency court, the Public Interest Law Section teamed up with the Real Property, Probate and Trust Law Section to put on training programs, as did local bars across the state. Fifty-four lawyers who had never represented a child before agreed to do so.“Last year I told you about the Masai warriors’ greetings to one another. When the first warrior would ask, ‘And how are the children?’ the response, expected because of their society, was: ‘All the children are well.’“While we cannot say that, yet, I believe we can honestly say, ‘The children are doing a little better.’ There is much more to do, and I hope you continue to do so.”Calling court funding “the biggest issue facing the Bar this year,” McGrane reported: “I am happy to say that though the courts did not receive all that was requested, this matter resolved favorably and our trial courts, on July 1, will be able to serve the people of Florida just as they have in the past.”McGrane gave credit to Chief Justice Harry Lee Anstead for his “courageous leadership,” but warned, “This issue will not go away.”The Special Commission on Lawyer Regulation, chaired by Board of Governors members Hank Coxe and Henry Latimer, “turned out to be a much larger project than anticipated.”A survey sent to a cross-section of people who have participated in the grievance process over the past three years—complainants, respondents, respondents’ counsel, Bar counsel, referees, and grievance committee members—garnered more than 3,000 responses. The commission has divided into subcommittees to analyze the data.“Kelly Johnson and I have agreed to extend the life of this commission for another year, and it is now projected that the commission’s final report will be returned sometime next year,” McGrane said.A fourth key issue of his term as president was diversity in the legal profession.“In April, we held an unprecedented symposium where diversity in our profession was the sole topic,” McGrane said. Chaired by MaryAnne Lukacs, a diverse group of lawyers attended the day-and-a-half-long symposium held at St. Thomas University School of Law.“Most notable was the fact that almost all of the law schools in Florida sent representatives,” McGrane said.A report from the symposium will be used as a guideline for the Bar’s future planning.“A number of recommendations have already been adopted by the Bar, and the Bar’s future leadership has committed to a program of inclusion.”McGrane reported that the state of The Florida Bar is good; the budget is balanced; and dues remain stable.Ending with his signature salutation, McGrane said: “My friends, today is a great day to be a Florida lawyer. I am proud to be one. You should be, too.” July 15, 2004 Associate Editor Regular News Kids, funding, and diversity accent McGrane’s yearlast_img read more

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May 15, 2005 Letters

first_imgMay 15, 2005 Letters Letters LeRoy Collins I want to voice my support for Steve Uhlfelder’s idea in his April 15 letter to the News to honor former Florida Gov. LeRoy Collins with a state holiday.Aside from being a progressive and principled governor during a difficult, transitional period in Florida’s history and the first director of the U.S. Community Relations Service fostering the nation’s march toward racial equality, he was also U.S. deputy secretary of commerce.I am proud to have been one of the first of many who urged Gov. Collins to run for the U.S. Senate, when I was privileged to visit with him in his cavernous office in the U.S. Department of Commerce building, in Washington, D.C. I was also honored to have the opportunity to participate actively in support of his U.S. senatorial candidacy in 1968.Although LeRoy Collins lost the U.S. senatorial electoral contest by a race-baiting Republican opposition, his reputation, charisma, and integrity remain a shining example of what a true public servant of the people of Florida should be.While his opponents have been consigned to the dustbin of Florida history and politics, the Collins Center for Public Policy, located in Tallahassee, continues daily making a positive difference, as did Collins’ life.The Florida Legislature should take a bipartisan look at this extraordinary public servant and honor the state and its people by creating a state holiday in his name. Richard N. Friedman Miami Judicial Independence This letter is not about Terri Schiavo, for whom we collectively pray will rest in peace. This letter is about denouncing as deplorable and unjustified the relentless attacks on the judiciary in the wake of her tragic case.Just how ruthless, extreme, and downright ignorant are the attacks? It has been widely reported that Judge George Greer has been accused of murder and terrorism by congressional “leaders” in Washington, received death threats, and has even been pressured to leave his church.That Judge Greer — an elected official — had the courage to consistently enter rulings grounded on and upholding the rule of law in the face of such enormous pressure demonstrates by example the character, competence, and commitment, and, by definition, professionalism of Florida’s judiciary. Moreover, Judge Greer’s refusal to be intimidated and bullied throughout this process is deserving of the utmost respect in any society which prides itself as governed by law.Enter the federal judiciary, lifetime appointees who are faithful to the U.S. Constitution, and who are not beholden to the electorate. Responding swiftly to the recent efforts of Congress to enact a special law meant to overturn rulings of the state courts of Florida, 20 federal judges in two days time agreed that the federal government had no business involving itself in the case. The mostly conservative U.S. Supreme Court tacitly agreed with that conclusion by twice refusing to intervene. What in essence did that “special” federal law do? It allowed for a new trial “regardless of whether such a claim has previously been raised, considered, or decided in state court proceedings.”Even for those of us who are not constitutional scholars, the wisdom and foresight of the founding fathers in creating three, co-equal branches of government is readily apparent when viewing Congress’ recent foray into this matter. Indeed, the words of warning by Alexander Hamilton when speaking of “dangerous innovations in the government” apply with equal force now, even though they were written over 200 years ago.Noticeably absent from the description of these judicial attacks at the outset of this message is the word “unprecedented.” Regrettably, we have all seen an increase in the frequency and tone of attacks on the judiciary in the years preceding the Schiavo case in other “hot button” issue cases where some have disagreed with judicial rulings.How did this train of destruction get so far down the track? There probably is no single answer. However, a persuasive argument can be made that the legal constraints which prevent the judiciary from fully responding has emboldened those who participate in these judicial attacks.And that’s the point — we all need to “wake up” and fully appreciate what is happening here. What we are seeing is a very sophisticated, sustained effort by powerful people meant to weaken the judiciary. Of equal importance, we need to recommit to use all of our powers and skills to protect our state and federal constitutions, and constitutional officers. Obviously, failure in this regard is simply not an option.The Dade County Bar — whose 4,500 members comprise the largest voluntary bar in Florida — honors and salutes all of those members of our judiciary, and assures the courts that we’re going to bat on your behalf when you can’t. Robert J. Fiore Chair of the Bar’s Standing Committee on Professionalism and president of the Dade County Bar Gay Adoption I strongly believe that The Florida Bar must allow the Family Law Section to lobby for HB 633 and SB 1534. These are good bills that, if enacted into law, would allow state approved foster parents to adopt regardless of their sexual orientation. The detractors of these bills are giving us the same song and dance as before, deriding this request by the Family Law Section as part of “the gay agenda.” In supporting their claims, they cite Bible verses, junk science and stereotypes, and gloss over the real science that has led the AMA, APA, and other numerous groups to endorse the concept of adoption by gays and lesbians. If this were a court of law, the myths these detractors promulgate would never be admitted into evidence.I recently received an unsolicited letter from another member of the Bar, in response to a prior letter written by me supporting the original request to lobby by the Family Law Section. In it, the author opines that gays “are more destructive to our country than flying planes into buildings,” and that homosexuality is “the filthy secret of our country.” Another recent letter to the News opined that children living with gays and lesbians would “become love targets for romantic recruiters in the gay foster parents’ communities.” The unreasonableness of these statements requires absolutely no editorializing by me.The prohibition on support of “divisive” issues within our Bar has at its core a very simple premise, and that is one of “reasonableness.” If a reasonable person would find it divisive, then it shouldn’t be allowed. The problem is that a small minority of unreasonable people want to keep our Bar from lobbying on behalf of good legislation that would benefit the Bar, our state, and our families. I plead with you not to let that happen again. Patrick C. Howell Orlando Florida’s the Best Last July I took and eventually passed the Florida Bar exam. I have been practicing here in Michigan since November of 2000. I am very proud of my Florida Bar membership, and have taken notice of all the bad press the Florida legal system has had in the past few months. I personally feel that the majority of the bad press is politically motivated, given who the governor of Florida is, but I could be wrong.I would just like to say, based on my knowledge and study of the Florida legal system, I find it to be more sophisticated, and more in tune with the U.S. Constitution and the spirit of the Bill of Rights than many of the states in the union. Since we have our young men and women fighting and dying every day in foreign countries, under the auspice of defending freedom, and their duty to engage in such activity is rooted in their oath to support and defend the Constitution of the United States, I say keep your heads high, and move forward without waiver or retreat.Do not allow media pressure to dissuade us from our oath and duty. We all, as members of the Bar, owe it to the people of the state of Florida to stay the course, and to seek justice and preserve the integrity of the system that impartially protects the rights of all, punishes those who run afoul of the law, and affords all an opportunity to plead their case.I live in Michigan, but am proud to be a member of The Florida Bar. Paul DeCailly Ann Arbor Lawyer Advertising I fully support Public Defender James Purdy’s position on lawyer advertising in the April 15 News. Once again the Board of Governors displays its lack of understanding of what it means to actually practice law. I have been to seminars regarding advertising where representatives of the Bar, none of whom were in private practice, lectured attorneys on what we can and cannot do in advertising. None of them had overhead, none of them had to juggle several different judges’ schedules, meet with clients, advise those clients, or, for that matter, manage the business of a law office. So, what do these people really know about running a law firm?Time and time again, we are prohibited from advertising, or our advertising is scrutinized, censored, and over-regulated. Now they tell us that they are considering banning direct mail advertising for 30 days after someone has been arrested. This is absurd. Thirty days is a crucial amount of time for someone arrested for DUI who only has 10 days to apply for a formal hearing in order to attempt to get their license back. That 30 days could be decisive, especially when swift action must often be taken to secure a person’s rights.What does the Bar do for us? When tort reform rears its ugly head, the Bar says it cannot get involved. When politicians from the president down target those “evil and greedy lawyers,” the Bar says it cannot get involved. When unreasonable and cantankerous clients fire us and cost us money, our recourse is severely limited because the Bar says so. Other than cost us money, what is it that the Bar does for practicing attorneys? And, we have no alternatives. Maybe Groucho Marx was on to something when he said, “I’d never join a club that would have me as a member.” Mark A. Gager West Melbourne ( Editor’s Note: The Board of Governors declined to propose extending the 30-day direct mail ban to criminal and traffic cases. See story on page 1 of the April 30 News .) May 15, 2005 Letterslast_img read more

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17 Times Entertainment History Was Made at Nassau Coliseum

first_imgEnd of An EraShortly after the coliseum reopens, it will make history once more when Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus host their final run of the nearly 150-year-old traveling circus with a month of performances at the arena. The last performance is May 21. Sign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Not until the Nassau Veterans Memorial Coliseum closed for more than a year to undergo extensive renovations did many Long Islanders realize how much they had taken the Uniondale arena for granted.Like lovers in an unanticipated breakup, we reminisced at the good times had at the beloved Old Barn. Heck, even the bad times seemed like fun in hindsight, but it wasn’t all rose-colored glasses. The trip down coliseum memory lane is paved with notable moments in sports and entertainment history.In honor of LI rekindling their old flame with the region’s biggest concert venue upon its reopening, what follows is 17 times history was made at Nassau Coliseum.17. Billy Joel’s First TV SpecialNumerous music videos have been shot at the coliseum. The Piano Man, the hometown hero who played the coliseum’s closing concert and is playing its reopening, recorded his first TV special, Billy Joel: Live From Long Island, at the coliseum on Dec. 30, 2982. It aired on HBO.16. Go To NassauPlenty of live albums were recorded at the coliseum, including two by The Grateful Dead. Wake Up to Find Out was recorded there during their 1990 performance and released in 2014 while Go To Nassau was recorded in ’80 and released in ’02. Although a Billy Joel jersey may hang from the arena rafters, The Grateful Dead hold the record for playing the most concerts there: 42.15. The DynastySure, the New York Islanders moved to Brooklyn in ’15. But their four consecutive Stanley Cup wins in the early ’80s still ranks among the most impressive championship streaks in all of sports, according to ESPN.14. Tricky Dick RallyNine months after the arena opened, then-President Richard Nixon headlined a Republican Party rally at the coliseum while running for re-election on Oct. 23, 1972, two years before the Watergate scandal made him become the only president in American history to resign.13. The Man In BlackJohnny Cash, who was the coliseum’s second musical performer, recorded one of his later concerts there when he toured as a part of the outlaw country rock super group, the Highwaymen, which included Cash, Willie Nelson, Waylon Jennings and Kris Kristofferson. Highwaymen Live! was filmed in ’90 and released the following year on VHS.12. Allman Bros. FTWThe first (non-bootleg) live album made at Nassau Coliseum was by The Allman Brothers Band, the southern-blues rockers who recorded their May 1, 1973 concert there the same year they released their fourth studio album, Brothers and Sisters.11. When The Doctor Was InThe Isles aren’t the only pro sports team to have brought championship titles to the coliseum. In the early ‘70s, the New York Nets called the arena home. Julius “Dr. J.” Erving, the Roosevelt native who popularized the slam dunk, led the team to their first American Basketball Association title in ’74 and another in ’76, the year the team moved to New Jersey and Erving was traded to the Philadelphia 76ers. What’s more, before the team called the coliseum home, a Feb. 11, 1972 Nets game was the very first event ever held at the arena.10. LI Goes to BollywoodThe Bollywood Movie Awards held its annual ceremony at the coliseum for about a decade. Award winners included some folks not typically associated with South Asian musical cinema. Michael Jackson won the Humanitarian Award in ’99, the first time it was held at the arena, and Donald Trump won the Global Leadership Award in ’07.9. Pink Floyd’s First Live Album and VideoAlthough known for their epic live performances, the influential British prog-rock band didn’t release a live album or video of their concerts until the last five shows on their A Momentary Lapse of Reason tour, which were held at the coliseum in ’88, more than 20 years after the band formed. Recordings were made into Delicate Sound of Thunder, which dropped later that year. Video footage was released the following year.8. The Marshal Tucker Band’s First Live AlbumMore than 30 years after this southern rock band formed, they released their first live album, Live from Long Island, in ’06. The recording was from an April 18, 1980 performance was the last with founding bassist Tommy Caldwell, who died 10 days later in a crash.7. Music and LyricsThe coliseum was enshrined in cinematic history when scenes from this ’07 romcom were shot at the coliseum. The movie, starring Hugh Grant and Drew Barrymore, follows a washed up pop star and the undiscovered songwriting prodigy that saves his career as the two fall in love.6. Metallica’s First Live VideoAfter the metal band’s bassist, Cliff Burton, died in a tour bus crash, Metallica released their first video, dubbed Cliff ‘Em All—an ode to their first studio album, I—compiled from footage of various concerts. The venue used for one of their fan favorites, “Master of Puppets”, was an ’86 show at the coliseum when they opened for Ozzy Osborne.5. Frank Zappa’s Last US ConcertThe legendary innovative rocker played his very last show in Europe two years before his death in ’93 at age 52, but his last show in the US was at the coliseum in ’88. His son, Dweezil, joined him on stage for an encore.4. Brawl GameThe Isles’ title run isn’t the only record they set. In an ’11 game vs. the Pittsburgh Penguins, they set a record for most penalty minutes for both teams—346 combined. The Islanders home was still the coliseum at the time and the game seemed to be more fistfights than actual hockey.3. When Elvis Left The BuildingThe King of Rock ‘n’ Roll left a big impact on the arena, although he didn’t exactly make history there. His four sold out concerts in ’73 were subject of a book, Elvis Pressley: Rock ‘n’ Nassau Summer of ’73, released in ’03. His last concert there was in ’75. He died six days before he was scheduled to return in July of ’77, prompting thousands of mourners to gather in the coliseum parking lot on the night of the canceled concert.2. Rap BanWhen stabbings left one dead and 12 injured following a Run DMC show at the coliseum in ‘88, the arena management banned rap concerts, although that ban was later lifted. The pre-concert preparations were mentioned in a segment on Yo MTV Raps! -With additional reporting by Russo Millienlast_img read more

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Credit union referral program demographics – Why it works, and who it works on

first_imgby: Ryan FryIn high school, I was the president of the board of directors of a credit union. The credit union was a student project backed by a local CU that was intended to teach us about the cooperative movement, and banking. I’m not sure how long it lasted after I left, it was still there when I graduated. Ironically, I went on to work at a bank all through my university and college, so I like to think that I know a thing or two about what credit unions are all about.My high school credit union was an experiment by the school to introduce volunteer students to banking, but its secondary purpose was to instill some of the concepts of the whole cooperative movement.I’m sure I don’t need to tell you, but credit unions are more about community, more about fostering and nurturing membership than the bottom line profits, or making a ton of money for some select few. They’re more about being the local financial institution that people remember from small towns, where everyone knows your name. Like the sitcom Cheers, but in FI form.This is a value proposition which appeals particularly to older folks, who grew up with more of a sense of community; people who tend to be a little more rural than ‘big city’, and it also naturally appeals to the older generation’s female demographic, being the more motherly and grandmotherly types.What I’m getting at is, demographically, credit unions members tend to skew on the older side. They also tend to skew female. They also tend to be more rural, and are more likely to own their own homes. continue reading » 2SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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