Boost for budgets as firms take action on skills gaps

first_imgBoost for budgets as firms take action on skills gapsOn 20 Apr 2004 in Personnel Today Related posts:No related photos. Previous Article Next Article Organisations are boosting training budgets as confidence in the privatesector rises and fears of skills shortages grow. The Training and Development Survey 2004, released today by the Chartered Instituteof Personnel and Development (CIPD), shows that while there was little changein the size of training budgets between 2002 and 2003, one in three privatesector training managers expect to see their training budget increase in 2004. Of the 531 organisations surveyed, 81 per cent have a training budget. TheCIPD said this was an indication that organisations accept the ‘training meansbusiness’ case. In a third of organisations, employees receive more than five days trainingper year. However, nearly one in five (18 per cent) receive less than threedays training per year. Despite the positive signs in the survey, the CIPD warned that anticipatedincreases in training budgets must materialise for the sake of the overalleconomy. Jessica Rolph, CIPD learning, training and development adviser, said:”If anticipated increases in training budgets do not materialise, currentskills shortages could translate into wage inflation, leading to adverseimplications for interest rates, growth and the economy as a whole. “Economic uncertainty has led to a ‘wait and see’ approach toinvestment in training,” she said, “but there is a danger thatemployers have not invested nearly enough in anticipation of impending skillsdeficiencies. “A failure to invest now could leave employers in many sectors short ofskilled labour, or needing to offer unsustainable salaries in order to fillvacancies for skilled workers,” she said. The survey also shows a surprising disparity of experience between public-and private-sector training managers. Thirty per cent of those in the publicsector reported that their training budget had decreased in 2003, compared with27 per cent in the private sector, and more than a quarter (26 per cent) of thepublic-sector training managers expect the budget to decrease further in thecoming year, compared with only 17 per cent in the private sector. The survey will be launched today at HRD, the CIPD’s annual learning,training and development conference and exhibition, which takes place at London’sOlympia on 20-22 April. By Quentin ReadeAverage training spend per employeeSize of firm                  Average training budget         Spend per employee25-49 employees          £33,833                                   £884.0650-99                           £58,504                                   £878.82100-249                       £111,658                                 £660.62250-499                       £212,132                                 £602.45500+                            £970,429                                 NotavailableSource: CIPD – Training and Development Survey 2004 Comments are closed. last_img read more

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Mercury levels in Southern Ocean squid: Variability over the last decade

first_imgThe concentrations of total and proportions of organic mercury were measured in tissues of 355 individuals of 8 species of Southern Ocean squid (Alluroteuthis antarcticus, Bathyteuthis abyssicola, Filippovia knipovitchi, Galiteuthis glacialis, Gonatus antarcticus, Kondakovia longimana, Psychroteuthis glacialis and Slosarczykovia circumantarctica). Squid were caught around South Georgia (Scotia Sea) during 5 cruises, between the austral summers of 2006/07 to 2016/17 to evaluate temporal changes in bioaccumulation and tissue partitioning. Total mercury concentrations varied between 4 ng g−1 and 804 ng g−1 among all tissues. Net accumulation of mercury in muscle with size was observed in A. antarcticus, B. abyssicola and P. glacialis, but no relationship was found for S. circumantarctica and lower concentrations were observed in larger individuals of G. glacialis. Muscle tissues had the highest mercury concentrations in the majority of species, except for F. knipovitchi for which the digestive gland contained highest concentrations. In terms of the percentage of organic mercury in the tissues, muscle always contained the highest values (67%–97%), followed by the digestive gland (22%–38%). Lowest organic mercury percentages were found consistently in the gills (9%–19%), suggesting only low levels of incorporation through the dissolved pathway and/or a limited redistribution of dietary organic mercury towards this tissue. Overall, results are indicative of a decreasing trend of mercury concentrations in the majority of analysed species over the last decade. As cephalopods are an important Southern Ocean trophic link between primary consumers and top predators, these changes suggest decreasing mercury levels in lower trophic levels and an alleviation of the mercury burden on higher predators that consume squid.last_img read more

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SQUILLANTE, ANNA MARIE (nee: Kretkowski)

first_imgpassed away on August 19, 2018. Anna Marie was a lifelong resident of Bayonne. Anna Marie was predeceased by her husband, Joseph Squillante, her parents Henry and Mary Kretkowski (nee: Fuchs), and her brother, Anthony Kretkowski. She is survived by her brother Henry Kretkowski and his wife Carolyn, her sons, Joseph, Jr. and his wife Gerri, Henry and his wife Kathleen, and Michael and his wife Mary. She was the grandmother of Ryan and his wife Bethany, Erik and his wife Courtney, Gabrielle, Nicole, Andrea, Sarah, Michael and his wife Michele, Lauren, and Maggie. Funeral Arrangements by DZIKOWSKI, PIERCE & LEVIS Funeral Home, 24 E. 19th St.last_img

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100% Rye Wholegrain Loaf

first_imgThis classic loaf manages to be both incredibly simple to make and very difficult to get perfect.The challenge lies in not over-cooking the grains; that way they absorb moisture during the final bake and then release it again during the few days the loaf is left to sit wrapped before selling.Use fine rye flour for the dough, available from Shipton Mills and other millers, as most of the sticky gluten in rye flour is contained in the husk rather than the endosperm, and rye flour that has been bolted to remove the bran will bake to a 100% rye loaf with a less sticky crumb.Makes 5 pieces at appx 575 raw weight, to bake to 5 small 400g tin loaves1.370kg cooked rye grains (see below)0.450kg rye sponge or leaven (see below)0.400kg water 0.700kg light rye flour 0.020kg salt 0.090kg honeyFor the cooked grainsCover the grains with water and simmer for 15 minutes then drain and cover with water, beer, cider or white wine and leave in a cool place overnight.For the leavenEither use a naturally fermented sour mixture of equal quantities fine rye flour and water, left to rise overnight, or use 250g fine rye flour mixed with 250g cold water and a pinch of yeast and leave this overnight in a cool place before use.MethodDrain the grains well (discard the soaking liquid) and place all the ingredients together in a small upright mixer, or mix by hand until you have an evenly combined grey paste.As rye flour does not contain extensible gluten there is no need to work the dough, and all that is needed is the shortest mix to combine the dough.Line 5 very clean 1lb loaf tins (or similar) with non-stick baking parchment, as the acidity in the dough can take on greenish black marks from the tin, and evenly divide the dough between them. Pack the dough down evenly, banging the tins on the end of the table to remove any gas bubbles.Cover the tins, and leave to rise for 1 hour (if using a commercial yeast sponge) or 3-4 hours (if using a naturally fermented rye leaven) until risen by 30%-50%.As the dough will bake into a dense-grained loaf like pumpernickel, you don’t want too much lift, as this will cause the loaf to crack when sliced.Preheat the deck to 200°C (top and bottom, no steam), cover the tops of the tins with greased foil, and bake for 30 minutes.Then lower the temperature (175°C top and bottom) and bake for a further 30 minutes.Then reduce the heat to 140°C (top and bottom) and bake for a further 1-1½ hours, removing the foil for the last 30 minutes to colour the upper surface.Remove from the tins to cool, then wrap well individually in oiled brown paper or waxed paper tied snuggly with string. Leave at room temperature or cooler for 48 hours before slicing.last_img read more

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Studies suggest the pandemic has caused birth issues

first_img Previous articleMichigan once again at the center of the national COVID surgeNext articleHelp for Michigan’s homebound: COVID vaccine outreach expands Tommie Lee WhatsApp Pinterest Twitter Facebook Facebook CoronavirusIndianaLocalMichiganNationalNewsSouth Bend Market WhatsApp (“NewBorn” by James Hall, CC BY 2.0) The pandemic has led to a number of pregnancy-related deaths, according to multiple studies.An analysis of 40 different studies from 17 countries shows more pregnant women died and more stillbirths were reported during the COVID pandemic.The New York Times says the study, published last week, suggested that pregnant women face a heightened risk of severe illness and death if infected with the coronavirus.The studies focused on the data from more than six million pregnancies. Google+ Studies suggest the pandemic has caused birth issues Twitter By Tommie Lee – April 12, 2021 0 199 Pinterest Google+last_img read more

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News story: Britain bites back in the fight against loan sharks

first_imgIn total, £5.67 million of funding will be provided to Britain’s Illegal Money Lending Teams (IMLT) and bodies in Northern Ireland to tackle illegal lending – a 16% increase compared to the previous year. The money will be used to investigate and prosecute illegal lenders, and to support those who have been the victim of a loan shark.Since the Illegal Money Lending Team was established in England in 2004, they’ve made over 380 prosecutions, leading to 328 years’ worth of sentences, and have written off over £73 million of illegal debt, helping over 28,000 people to escape the jaws of the loan sharks. Similar teams operate in Scotland and Wales.In Northern Ireland, the Consumer Council will lead its first ever education and awareness campaign to help prevent the most vulnerable from being bitten by loan sharks, and the Police Service of Northern Ireland (PSNI) will get funding for a specialised officer who will lead on illegal lending within the Paramilitary Crime Task Force.Tony Quigley, Head of the England Illegal Money Lending Team, said: These nasty lenders are nothing more than lowlife crooks taking hard-earned cash from the pockets of the most vulnerable. Over 300,000 people are in debt to illegal money lenders in the Britain and they need to know that we’re on their side. That’s why we’re taking the fight to the loan sharks and spending more than ever to support their victims. Loan sharks are a blight on society and prey on vulnerable people who struggle to make ends meet. These criminals use callous methods to enforce repayment and victims are often subjected to threats, intimidation and violence. We will not tolerate this sort of criminal activity in our country and loan sharks who are caught flouting the law will be pursued and prosecuted. It is important for people to realise that alternatives to borrowing from loan sharks are available if you are in financial difficulty. Loan sharks are never the answer and we strongly support credit unions who can provide a safe and legal alternative. If you have been affected by illegal money lending, please call our confidential hotline on 0300 555 2222. John Glen, Economic Secretary to the Treasury said:center_img Britain bites back in the fight against loan sharksLoan sharks face a fresh crackdown today (25 April), with more funding to tackle unlawful lending, and an increase in the amount of money seized from loan sharks to support those most vulnerable to their nasty tactics. over £5.5 million will be spent to fund the fight against loan sharks, helping to investigate and prosecute illegal lenders, and support their victims £100,000 of money already seized from loan sharks will also be spent to encourage people in England at risk of being targeted by loan sharks to join a credit union, helping them to access a safer form of finance and get their lives back on track and for the first time in Northern Ireland a new education project will be created to raise awareness of the dangers of loan sharks and to support vulnerable communitieslast_img read more

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Forgotten Jewish fighters

first_img A young soldier rushes into battle in this postcard reading “For Home. For the Motherland. For Freedom!” Artist M.A. Andreev Klara Grigorievna Rinkina is 91 years old and lives near Boston. She is 5 feet tall, with silver hair and a pleasant, round face. Rinkina is also a war hero, having served as a Red Army medic during what Russians still call the Great Patriotic War. On special occasions she wears a sweater pinned from neck to waist with medals.One of those special occasions came this month, during an exhibit opening at Pusey Library. Rinkina and five fellow veterans were there — all Jews, whose presence in the Red Army is a little-known story.The Soviet Union gathered a fighting force of 20 million men and women during 1941-45, the largest army fielded during World War II. About 500,000 of the soldiers were Jewish; of these, a third died in combat.In 2005, the Blavatnik Family Foundation determined to redress the neglected story of Soviet Jewish fighters. One result is the exhibit running at the Pusey through Nov. 26: “Lives of the Great Patriotic War,” a multimedia glimpse at surviving Jewish veterans, along with a vivid recounting of the war’s wider context. At the heart of the project are personal stories.The exhibit includes illustrated mini-histories of decisive military actions alongside intimate wartime ephemera — photographs from thousands of drawers and scrapbooks; postcards, millions of which were sent from the front; and battered letters folded into triangles. There would be more letters, one soldier wrote, but war got in the way. “It’s Hitler’s fault.”Making the traveling exhibit possible is an oral history project of the Blavatnik Archive Foundation. Since 2006, said project coordinator Julie Reines Chervinsky, the project has captured on high-definition video the stories of more than 1,100 Jewish veterans from 11 countries.“It’s my hope that this exhibit will shed light on an often-overlooked moment in Russian Jewish history,” archive founder Leonard Blavatnik, M.B.A. ’89, wrote in an email. “Half a million Jewish soldiers, many highly decorated, fought for the Soviet Army against fascism in WWII. It’s our responsibility to never forget the generation that came before us and to extend our eternal gratitude to those who fought so valiantly and sacrificed so much for the betterment of mankind.”The Blavatnik project includes archived interviews with 14 Jewish Red Army veterans in the Boston area, including Rinkina. Video excerpts from all 14 — and from many others — are part of the Pusey exhibit. This postcard shows the Soviet bombardment of oil refineries in Ploesti (Romania). Postcard by V.P. Belkin. Images courtesy of the Blavatnik Archive Foundation Cadet Avraham Levin (third row from bottom, on left) pictured with compatriots in Brest, Belarus in 1940. Holocaust studies have gone a long way in documenting the fate of Jews during the war, but “this part of the history had not been captured,” said Chervinsky, who conducted about 100 of the interviews. Veterans talked about their lives before the war, she said; about their first encounters with the war; and sometimes about postwar humiliations, when Jews were stung and thwarted by explicitly anti-Semitic Soviet propaganda.“We didn’t interview the heroes or the generals,” said Chervinsky, “just the people in the trenches.”The war began for the Soviets on June 22, 1941, the day of the German invasion. Most Soviet Jews had given up outward professions of their faith decades before, and they were full citizens of Stalin’s universe. By the time of the invasion, many inhabited areas to the west that were hit hardest by the invasion, including Lithuania, Belarus, and parts of Ukraine.Veterans in the Blavatnik interviews recalled the burst of patriotism in those dark early days of the war. “Immediately,” said 93-year-old Boston-area veteran Fishel Gershovich Sakhin, “I and many others volunteered to serve in the army. We wanted to be sent to the front.”By the end of the war, 300 Jews had risen to the rank of general or admiral; 160,000 medals and orders were awarded — making Jews the fourth-largest Soviet “nationality” cited for courage.There was patriotism, but many Jewish veterans recorded a second major motivation: revenge, especially as the war shifted against the Germans, moved west, and revealed death camps.For Rinkina, the impulse to revenge came earlier: in 1941, when she discovered German invaders had killed her parents — the first of 49 family members to die at the hands of Nazis. “I want to go to the front,” Rinkina told a recruiter that summer, recounting her story through a translator at the exhibit. “I want to revenge my parents.”At 17, she had already escaped the barbed-wire-bound Jewish ghetto in her native Minsk, where pogroms were common. She had already joined a band of partisan fighters in a Belarus forest. And she had already nearly died, of pneumonia, before she was airlifted to Gorky, and then to Omsk in Siberia.“Look at you — you’re a pretty little girl,” the recruiter told her. He sent Rinkina to nurse’s training. She served from January 1942 until the end of the war, most often in combat theaters: Gomel, the winter Orsha offensives of 1943, Brest, Lodz, Prague, Warsaw, Krakow, and finally Berlin, where she was part of the famed 1st Belorussian Front attack group.Rinkina was at the Elbe River on April 25, 1945, when the Soviet and U.S. armies came together. “Very handsome, nice guys,” she said of the Americans, who traded watches for vodka.She showed photographs from a small scrapbook. In one, Rinkina leans against the flank of a stone lion in front of the bullet-pocked Reichstag.The victory was ecstatic; the war was years of hell. “It was a horrible experience,” said the old veteran’s daughter, Natalia Rinkina. “She never wants it to happen again.” Her mother still has nightmares, she added.The context of those nightmares was provided in a discussion before the exhibit opening, hosted by Provost Alan M. Garber. The panel was moderated by Board of Overseers member Tracy Palandjian ’93, M.B.A. ’97, and included Graham Allison, Douglas Dillon Professor of Government, and two-time ambassador R. Nicholas Burns, the Sultan of Oman Professor of International Relations.In his introductory remarks, Peter L. Thoren, executive vice president of Blavatnik’s Access Industries, considered the history of U.S.-Russia relations. During the Cold War in the 1970s, the two nations were “partners in a fleeting détente,” said Thoren. After the fall of the Soviet Union, he said, the relationship was “improved but fitful.”The high point of that friendlier era, said Allison, started in 1991 with the “huge collaboration” between two uneasy countries in the effort to collect and control Soviet nuclear weapons. As with WWII, he added, “the heaviest lifting was done by the Russians.”Now — with Syria, the Crimea, and other divisions — the United States and Russia are back in a “doldrum” resembling the Cold War, said Allison.At center stage is Vladimir Putin, who, said Burns, “has brought back Cold War passions.” Allison agreed. “If you were central casting, you couldn’t do better than Putin.” He called the present Russian regime “a KGB-retro machine,” with which “relations will not get better” any time soon.At least the immediate crisis has eased, said Burns, in part because Putin “knows he can’t afford more sanctions.”Underneath the present is the past, the panelists said. The psyche of the Russia people still echoes with the wounds of the Great Patriotic War, in which at least 20 million Soviets died. For every German killed fighting the USSR, 10 Soviets were killed. Visiting a place like St. Petersburg — besieged Leningrad during the war — “you can feel it,” said Burns.But once the “40-somethings” in Russia are in charge, and memories of the hot war and the Cold War fade, things will change, said Allison. “They understand the [challenges] of the 21st century are transnational, and that climate change is the metaphor.”The Lives of the Great Patriotic War exhibition runs from October 23-November 26, 2014 in Pusey Library, Monday-Friday, 9am-5pm. No Harvard ID is required. This portrait of a March 1945 command inspection of an observation station in Breslau shows Jewish soldier Dimitry Shore (far left). Picturing the Great Patriotic War Soviet Jewish veterans in more recent times. Reading “On the Way to the Patriotic War,” this postcard shows happy soldiers of all ages on the march. Artists V. Ninogradov and Y. Nikolaevlast_img read more

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Librarian lectures on monk

first_imgDr. David Jenkins, Librarian for Classic, Hellenistic Studies and Linguistics at Princeton University, made the case for Byzantine Literature in his lecture in McKenna Hall Tuesday.Jenkins’ lecture was given as part of a series on classical studies to honor the legacy of the late Sabine MacCormack, a Notre Dame historian and classicist. During his time as a librarian at Notre Dame, Jenkins said he collaborated with MacCormack to purchase books for the Byzantine collection.Jenkins’ lecture was centered around the 11th century monk, philosopher and politician Michael Psellos.“Of all the writers of his time, no one was more responsible for the judgment and appreciation of Byzantine literature than Michael Psellos,” Jenkins said.Jenkins said Psellos was born to a prominent family, likely around 1018, in Constantinople. He worked for a number of Byzantine emperors and was known for his oratory abilities.“He excelled in orations and was reported to have recited the entire ‘Iliad’ while still in his youth,” he said.Since much of the information about Psellos comes from his own autobiographies, Jenkins said Psellos likely exaggerated the influence he acquired through political patronage.“As a philosopher, Psellos taught the emperors two things: Great deeds require great praises and great deeds require great philosophy,” Jenkins said. “In other words, Psellos would be the one to instruct the emperors on how to achieve great deeds through his philosophy.”Jenkins concentrated on Psellos’ philosophical interests in saying Byzantine literature ought to be encountered on its own terms and as more than a list of facts. Jenkins said literature of the Byzantine Empire has often been cast aside for its perceived lack of originality and its dependence on more highly-esteemed classical sources.“The literature these Byzantine writers produced has been regarded as unoriginal literature written in a dead language largely for sycophantic purposes,” he said. “But this assumes that the works they produced ought to be compared to their classical forefathers.”Encountering Byzantine literature on its own terms involves a certain paradox, Jenkins said. Normally, researchers try not to project their biases onto the past and stay close to primary sources, but encountering history on its own terms makes it difficult for researchers to avoid bias.Jenkins said Psellos operated in a similar frame of contradictions in the 11th century, focusing on the duality of Christ’s human and divine nature and devising a sophisticated treatment of the liar’s paradox.“Literature that aspires to something deeper than a grocery list does not necessarily need philosophical arguments in its defense, but it cannot do without the experience of a contradictory spark that drives its creation,” he said.Tags: Byzantine Empire, Byzantine Literature, David Jenkins, Iliad, McKenna Hall, Michael Pselloslast_img read more

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Invasive plant workshop

first_imgUniversity of GeorgiaBy their very nature, invasive exotic plants become obvious to everybody. And once you see these pest plants’ potential to overtake large areas, you want to know more about how to control them.The Georgia Exotic Pest Plant Council wants you to know, too.The GA-EPPC has gathered experts from around the state to provide the Invasive Plant Control Workshop March 21 in Athens, Ga.Homeowners, landowners and anyone else interested in controlling invasive exotic plants are invited to learn about the worst pest plants in north Georgia and how to safely control them.Participants will get a three-ring binder of presentations, reference material and other information. They’ll learn: How to recognize the most serious invasive plants.How to effectively and safely use herbicides.How to understand herbicide labels.How to use nonchemical methods and when they will work.How to know the best control methods for your site. Connie Gray, special projects coordinator for Trees Atlanta, and Malcolm Hodges of the Georgia Chapter of The Nature Conservancy will lead the workshop. Gray and Hodges are president and vice president of the GA-EPPC.Scheduled during the Southeast Exotic Pest Plant Council Annual Symposium March 20-22, the workshop will be in Room K of Georgia Center for Continuing Education from 9 a.m. to noon on March 21.For anyone not attending the symposium, the workshop cost is $50.To learn more, visit www.gaeppc.org or www.se-eppc.org. Or call the Georgia Center at (706) 542-6596 or (800) 884-1419. Or contact Gray at (404) 522-4097 or [email protected]last_img read more

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Resilient Pearl Millet

first_imgA global team of 65 scientists, including nine from the University of Georgia, have decoded some of the secrets to the crop’s coping strategies. The newly sequenced and decoded pearl millet genome, published Sept. 18 in the journal Nature Biotechnology, will help crop breeders create more drought-tolerant millet and develop climate adaptation strategies in other important cereal crops.This research used the latest innovations in DNA sequencing and analysis to identify new genetic tools, like molecular markers related to drought and heat tolerance, as well as other important traits, such as nutritional quality and pest resistance.The project was co-led by the International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics (ICRISAT) headquartered in India, BGI-Shenzhen headquartered in China and the French National Institute for Research for Sustainable Development (IRD).“A hundred million people depend on pearl millet,” said Jason Wallace, of UGA’s Department of Crop and Soil Sciences. “It can grow right up to the edge of the Sahara desert. Understanding its genome will help us turn that information into better crops for them and for us.”Pearl millet is grown on about 66.7 million acres worldwide and is a daily staple for more than 90 million people, many of whom are among the most vulnerable in arid and semiarid Africa and Asia. It is also an important source of animal feed and forage for millions of farms.However, pearl millet yields have remained low over the last six decades, as this cereal is primarily grown in poor soil conditions without irrigation and minimal to no fertilizer or other agricultural inputs.Investment in genetic research for this smallholder crop has been limited, and breeders have had limited genetic information to develop high-yielding, superior varieties and hybrids that respond to farmers’ constraints.This pearl millet genome research has led to a better understanding of its genetic variability. Researchers have identified candidate genes for very important traits, such as resistance to downy mildew, a very damaging millet disease, and pearl millet’s exceptional heat tolerance.“Most cereals, like rice or maize, cannot support temperatures over 30 to a maximum 35 degrees Celsius (85 to 95 degrees Fahrenheit) when they start forming their grain, whereas pearl millet will fill its grain in air temperatures of up to 42 degrees (C) (107 F),” said Professor Rajeev Varshney of ICRISAT, who coordinated the International Pearl Millet Genome Sequencing Consortium. “We have found that, compared to other cereals like wheat, rice or maize, pearl millet has a more diverse repertoire of genes for natural wax proteins, which act as thermal protection for the plant.”Such heat resistance is crucial as climate experts forecast further heat waves in years to come. Understanding the basis of pearl millet’s heat and drought tolerance could also help improve these traits in other crops, either by advanced breeding or biotechnology.Researchers in UGA’s Department of Genetics, Department of Horticulture, Department of Crop and Soil Sciences, Department of Plant Biology, the Plant Genome Mapping Laboratory and the Institute of Plant Breeding, Genetics and Genomics lent their specialized expertise in the millet genome sequencing.Professor Jeff Bennetzen and postdoctoral researcher Hao Wang, of the Department of Genetics, provided analysis of transposable element composition and distribution in the pearl millet genome.Professor Katrien M. Devos, of the Department of Plant Biology, the Department of Crop and Soil Sciences, and the Institute of Plant Breeding, Genetics and Genomics, generated a framework genetic map and conducted the comparisons between pearl millet and foxtail millet that were used to improve the assemblies.Professor Peggy Ozias-Akins and Assistant Research Scientist Joann Conner, of the Department of Horticulture and the Institute of Plant Breeding, Genetics and Genomics, helped annotate the pearl millet genome sequence with data from reproductive tissues.Professor Andrew Paterson and Associate Research Scientist Xiyin Wang, of the Department of Crop and Soil Sciences, the Department of Genetics, the Department of Plant Biology and the Plant Genome Mapping Laboratory, studied the evolution of the pearl millet genome in comparison to other cereal crops.Assistant Professor Jason Wallace, of the Department of Crop and Soil Sciences and the Institute of Plant Breeding, Genetics and Genomics, led the work to convert the initial, short genome fragments into long assemblies using data from pearl millet plants contributed by collaborators in Georgia, India and Africa.Postdoctoral researcher Peng Qi, of the Department of Plant Biology, the Department of Crop and Soil Sciences and the Institute of Plant Breeding, Genetics and Genomics, assisted with the generation of a framework genetic map and conducted the comparisons between pearl millet and foxtail millet that were used to improve the assemblies.The team’s publication on the pearl millet genome can be found at www.nature.com/nbt/journal/vaop/ncurrent/full/nbt.3943.html . Details about this research are available at ceg.icrisat.org/ipmgsc/.(The staff of the International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics contributed to this release.)last_img read more

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