Law students spend January in Lesotho with U.S. government

first_imgOn an early morning in January, eight upper-year Harvard Law School students landed on the lone runway at the sleepy international airport in Lesotho where they were warmly welcomed by officials from the U.S. Embassy and the U.S. government’s Millennium Challenge Corporation (“MCC”), an innovative U.S. government foreign assistance agency. Though still recovering from the day-and-a-half-long trip to Lesotho, the students had a lot to accomplish in the three short weeks ahead and dove into action on two exciting law and international development projects organized by the student organization, the Harvard Law & International Development Society (“LIDS”).With the support of the HLS Office of Clinical and Pro Bono Programs and financial support from the MCC and HLS International Legal Studies program, four of the students, under the supervision of Professor Lucie White, worked on the ongoing effort to decentralize health services in the country. The other four students, under the supervision of Professor Joseph Singer, worked with MCC’s local partners on a program to issue land titles in informal settlements in and around the local capital of Maseru.This trip is one of many opportunities sponsored by LIDS, a student organization started only two years ago in light of the growing student interest in the field of law and international development. James Small, a third-year student graduating this spring, described the trip as “a tremendous learning experience. Although I have had the opportunity to engage in significant human rights-related coursework and clinical work while at HLS, until this January I had never done fieldwork in a developing country. Although it was a short time frame, it was still a terrific opportunity to finally get on-the-ground experience.” Read Full Storylast_img read more

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Quick hits: Cancer-causing pellets being dropped along the Mountain Valley Pipeline path

first_imgCancer causing pellets are being dropped along the Mountain Valley Pipeline path in WV Pellets used to prevent erosion and provide soil stabilization have been dropped near the path of the Mountain Valley Pipeline in Greenville, WV. The pellets were dropped from a helicopter and have been found to contain a cancer-causing chemical called acrylamide. Organic farmers in the area say the pellets were dropped on their farm, a quarter mile away from the pipeline, and that the pellets contaminated their soil, risking their livelihood. Complaints about the pellets were made to the West Virginia Department of Environmental Protection and to Mountain Valley Pipeline but the pellet drops have continued, this time in Monroe County, WV. The Conservation Fund in partnership with the U.S. Forest Service has announced the addition of 186 acres to the Cherokee National Forest. The land is located in the tri-corner area of Tennessee, North Carolina and Virginia, less than 20 miles east of Abingdon, VA and only two miles from the Virginia Creeper Trail. Known as Divided Mountain because of its location spanning the Tennessee Valley Divide, the property protects headwaters of Whetstone Branch and Valley Creek of the South Holston River watershed and Big Horse Creek of the North Fork New River basin. The new purchase connects over 127,000 acres of contiguous public land. The property will be managed by the U.S. Forest Service as part of Cherokee National Forest.center_img 186 acres added to the Cherokee National Forestlast_img read more

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Putting the Best Possible Team on the Field

first_imgBy By U.S. Navy Admiral Kurt W. Tidd, Commander, U.S. Southern Command; and U.S. Ambassador to Trinidad and Tobago John L. Estrada July 11, 2016 It seems “gender equality” is on track to be the 2016 phrase of the year. It’s certainly been trending on social media. What receives less attention, however, is the far thornier topic of unequal access to opportunities. As a four-star Combatant Commander and U.S. Ambassador (who was also the 15th Sergeant Major of the United States Marine Corps), our long careers have enabled us to recognize and respect the role women play in advancing our national interests and our country’s goals of peace, stability and prosperity. We recognize that what makes us diverse makes us strong. And we recognize that no nation, including the United States, can get ahead if half its population is left behind. With a combined 66 years of service to our nation, we’re looking to impart some of these hard-learned lessons on the importance of equal opportunity in our respective services. It is noteworthy and encouraging that there have been three female Secretaries of State in the last 15 years. However, the Foreign Service (much like the U.S. Military) was not always so accommodating to women. In the “Mad Men” era of the 1960s, it was assumed that women would resign from the Service once they got married. And it wasn’t until 2015, that the U.S. military formally opened up 220,000 formerly closed positions and occupations to women. Equal opportunity is more than just lip service or filling a quota in today’s security environment; it is a strategic imperative. As leaders in defense and diplomacy, we’re here to tell you: This isn’t about leveling the playing field; it’s about putting the best possible team on the field. As we have seen over and over across countless professions, when given the same opportunities, women repeatedly show just how equal they are to their male colleagues. Like millions of others, they serve magnificently in our Embassies and on our front lines. They are seasoned diplomats and combat-tested soldiers, U.S. Ambassadors and four star Combatant Commanders . . . who just happen to be women. How accepting is our own hemisphere of the principles and pragmatism of gender inclusion? Let’s look at some numbers. Women now account for roughly four to seven percent of militaries in the Americas — and in Argentina and Uruguay, they make up 11 and 16 percent. Since 1973, the number of women in our enlisted ranks has increased seven fold to 14 percent, and among our officers has quadrupled to 16 percent. There are now over 1,200 United Nations Police women from 63 countries serving in peacekeeping missions around the world, and in 2014, for the first time, a woman was designated as force commander of the U.N. Mission in Cyprus. Latin America’s female representation in peacekeeping operations, while still low, is higher than most. But of the 36 countries in our hemisphere, only four — soon to be five — have a National Action Plan to advance the principles of women in peace and security. Seven out of the top ten countries in the world with the highest murder rates of females are in Latin America. Every year, tens of thousands of women and girls are victims of human trafficking and sexual exploitation. Women in our hemisphere overwhelmingly bear the burden of insecurity and instability — which means they must be a large part of the solution. And from Buenos Aires to Mexico City, millions of women across the hemisphere are doing exactly that, joining together to call for an end to gender-based violence. It’s for these reasons, and many others not listed, that we are beginning this dialogue, which we started [last] the week of June 13th in the inaugural 2016 Women in Military and Defense Conference, co-hosted by the Trinidad and Tobago Defence Forces and U.S. Southern Command. While we’ve come far, there are yawning gaps between words and actions still to close, entrenched cultural challenges still to address, and ceilings still to break. Let us not dwell on the past, but rather use our individual histories to shape solutions and help our institutions tackle roadblocks that still prevent us from fielding our best, most capable teams. We salute the men and women throughout the hemisphere who are committed to changing their communities and countries for the better. Let’s get to work! This Op-Ed was originally published by The Miami Herald on July 4th.last_img read more

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Basic Skills Course Requirement (BSCR) Notice

first_img Basic Skills Course Requirement (BSCR) Notice Basic Skills Course Requirement (BSCR) Notice October 1, 2005 Regular Newscenter_img Effective May 12, 2005, the Supreme Court of Florida amended Rule 6-12, Rules Regulating The Florida Bar. This rule governs the Basic Skills Course Requirement (BSCR) for new Bar members. See In Re: Amendments to the Rules Regulating The Florida Bar, 903 So. 2d 183 (Fla. 2005). In summary:• The Practicing with Professionalism (PWP) program sponsored by the Young Lawyers Division of The Florida Bar must now be completed 12 months preceding or 12 months following admission to The Florida Bar. Attendance may be deferred for: active military duty; undue hardship; nonresident status; and inactive membership status.• A Bar member who was a full-time government employee as of May 12, 2005, and who has continued in government practice after May 12, 2005, may continue to defer both components of BSCR which include: 1) PWP; and, 2) three basic level courses sponsored by the Young Lawyers Division of The Florida Bar. The assignment of a “government deferral” status on a member’s Bar record as of May 12, 2005, is not required to qualify for the deferral.• Full-time government employment which began after May 12, 2005, will entitle a member to defer the three basic level courses, but not PWP.• A Bar member who was a full-time government employee on or before May 12, 2005, and who has continued in government practice for a period of six years is eligible to exempt PWP.• Six years of full-time government practice, beginning either before or after May 12, 2005, will entitle a member to be exempt from the three basic level courses.• An annual renewal of deferral eligibility is no longer required by The Florida Bar. In accordance with the amended rule, a member must now “promptly notify The Florida Bar in writing” when no longer eligible to defer BSCR. The member must then complete PWP within 12 months of deferment expiration and attend three elective, basic, substantive continuing legal education programs sponsored by the YLD within 24 months of deferment expiration.• A Bar member who has been continuously engaged in the practice of law (nongovernmental) in a foreign jurisdiction for at least five years, and who can demonstrate completion of 30 hours of approved CLE within the immediate three-year period, and can attest that the CLE completed has reasonably prepared the member for the anticipated type of practice in Florida, is eligible to be exempt from the three basic level courses.• The PWP attendance requirement may now be fulfilled 12 months prior to admission to The Florida Bar.If you have any questions about your BSCR obligations, you may call The Florida Bar Legal Specialization & Education Department at 850/561-5842. Members are also encouraged to check your BSCR status online at floridabar.org.last_img read more

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BP and Reliance Authorize Third Stage of KG D6 Gas Fields Project

first_imgReliance Industries Limited (RIL) and BP today announced the sanction of the MJ project (also known as D55) in Block KG D6, offshore the east coast of India.MJ is the third of three new projects in the Block KG D6 integrated development plan and its approval follows sanctions for the development of ‘R-Series’ deep-water gas field in June 2017 and for the Satellites cluster in April 2018.Together the three projects are expected to develop a total of about 3 trillion cubic feet (tcf) of discovered gas resources with a total investment of circa INR 35,000 crore (US$5 billion). These projects together, when fully developed, will bring about 1 billion cubic feet a day of new domestic gas onstream, phased over 2020-2022.Mukesh Ambani, Chairman and Managing Director of RIL, said: “Bringing these three discoveries to production, as promised in 2017, by leveraging the existing infrastructure has been the primary objective of the Reliance – BP Joint Venture. The gas will satiate the increasing demand for clean fuel in the country, save foreign exchange and reduce dependency on imported gas. We are excited about bringing this gas onshore from our third project on the East Coast of India to power the Indian economy with an environment-friendly fuel and help strengthen energy security while moving towards meeting India’s Climate Change Goal.”Bob Dudley, BP Group Chief Executive, welcomed the investment decision: “We are building an important upstream business in India, helping to supply the country’s growing gas market. Working closely with Reliance, we are efficiently developing discovered resources, with focused exploration to give options for the future. This latest investment is a further demonstration of BP’s commitment to India and helps support India in addressing the dual challenge and moving to a low carbon future.”Integrated field development of deep-water gas fieldsMJ is a gas condensate field and is the third field under development as part of the KG D6 integrated development campaign. The project is in 700-1100 metres water depth, with a well depth of 4200 metres below mean sea-level in a high-temperature and pressure environment. It comprises of wells connected to a subsea production, with tie-back to a Floating ProductionStorage and Offloading (FPSO) vessel to process and separate liquids, and gas which will be exported to the onshore terminal through one of the existing 24 inch trunk pipelines. The project is expected to begin production in mid-2022.The first of the three KG D6 projects under development, the R-Series project, is in execution phase. All six wells have been drilled. With this, the first installation campaign; in which a 54-line km, 18”/4” piggyback flow line was installed in 1920m water depth – setting a new world record for deep-water pipelay installation, has been successfully completed. First gas from this project is on-schedule and expected by mid-2020. The second project, the development of the Satellites cluster, is on track with all major contracts awarded to deliver first gas by mid-2021. The MJ project will draw on execution synergies with the R-Series and Satellite projects being developed, concurrently.last_img read more

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Boxing world divided on Fury,Wilder II predictions

first_img The pair fought to a split-decision draw in December 2018, with Fury, 31, largely outboxing Wilder, 34, for much of the 12 rounds but was twice dropped by the WBC heavyweight world champion. Since that thrilling fight in Los Angeles 15 months ago, the Gyspy King has gone on to beat Tom Schwarz and Otto Wallin in Las Vegas to build his Stateside profile ahead of the rematch. Wilder on the other hand, scored stunning knockouts against Dominic Breazeale and Luis Ortiz in 2019 which has made him a razor thin bookies favourite in the US to beat Fury. But the predictions of fighting legends are also inconclusive with the title fight a ‘classic pick’em fight’. Larry Holmes – Hall of FamerFURY, KNOCKOUT: “Deontay Wilder will knock out Tyson Fury in the seventh or eighth round if he does what I know that he can do, which is stay on the outside, use his jab, throw that right hand over the jab.” Sugar Ray Leonard – Hall of FamerWILDER, POINTS: “I like Deontay Wilder to win, possibly by knockout, but, in truth, I don’t see either guy being knocked out. I think that Wilder not only has that powerful right hand, but that he has improved in his ability to set it up. “On the other hand, I know that Tyson Fury has excellent boxing abilities and a tremendous chin from the way that he got up from the two knockdowns in their previous fight. “In the end, I think that Wilder is always in shape and that he will use his speed and power to get the job done.” Thomas Hearns – Hall of FamerWILDER, POINTS: “Deontay Wilder can box and win, but I think that his power will be the difference in defeating Tyson Fury. “I believe that it will go to a decision again, but with Deontay Wilder winning it.” Promoted ContentWho Earns More Than Ronaldo?15 Celebs Who Fell From Grace With Their CareersGorgeous Asian Actresses All Men Are Crazy About9 Fictional Universes We Wouldn’t Want To Live In7 Reasons It’s Better To Be A VeganTop 10 Enemies Turned Friends In TVCouples Who Celebrated Their Union In A Unique, Unforgettable Way9 Facts You Should Know Before Getting A TattooWhy Go Veg? 7 Reasons To Do ThisTop 10 Most Romantic Nations In The World6 Extreme Facts About Hurricanes6 Incredibly Strange Facts About Hurricanes Mike Tyson – Hall of FamerFURY, WIN: “It’s not easy to hit Tyson Fury, as big as he is it’s very difficult to hit he’svery elusive. It will be a really interesting fight because both guys have something to prove and I just wish the best for Tyson Fury, I’m always a Tyson fan.” Evander Holyfield – Hall of FamerWILDER, POINTS: “I’m picking Deontay Wilder based on his confidence and the fact that he does all of the right things to remain in great shape, and that he’s committed to his craft. “Wilder’s not just a big guy with a right hand, but he’s also become more calculated in his approach. That’s why I’m picking him to win this second fight against Tyson Fury.” David Haye – Former heavyweight championWILDER, KNOCKOUT: “I don’t think people have mentioned the horrendous cut that Tyson Fury received in his last fight. “I believe that will be opened up and once he’s lost one eye Tyson Fury’s view and perspective will be lost and he’ll unfortunately be walking onto one of the biggest shots in boxing history, as Wilder is that guy unfortunately.” Paulie Malignaggi – Former two-division world championFURY, POINTS: “I feel like it’s going to be Tyson Fury on points, but it’s a fight between the two best fighters in the weight class. “The onus is on Deontay Wilder to make the adjustments, whereas if Fury fights the same fight, odds are, he’s probably going to get the decision.” Manny Pacquiao – Eight division championWILDER, KNOCKOUT: “Never bet against a puncher, particularly one like Deontay Wilder. I look at Wilder like I do at a Mike Tyson, another puncher. I see Wilder winning this rematch with Tyson Fury by 10th-round knockout.” Anthony Joshua – Unified heavyweight championFURY, WIN: “I think Fury wins. A man who nearly done it the first time won’t get it wrong the second time. “That’s the only reason why. I think that he came close the first time to the point of a draw, it wasn’t like a 12-round masterclass then got battered in the 12th and that just separated it. Read Also:Tyson Fury sends Anthony Joshua warning ahead of Deontay Wilder rematch “It was a draw, it was that close. So I just think Tyson Fury is going to correct his wrongs and come back and win.” FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 Loading… With Tyson Fury and Deontay Wilder preparing to settle the score in their rematch, the boxing world is divided on who will come out on top.last_img read more

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French Open now eyeing September 27 start: report

first_imgThe organisers of the French Open, who were criticised for unilaterally moving the tournament to a September start without consulting other tennis federations, could delay the event by another week, a report said Friday. The Philippe Chatrier court at Roland Garros, complete with a new retractable roof, would host the finals of the French Open The claycourt Grand Slam could now start on September 27 instead of September 20, preceded by a week of qualification matches, Le Parisien newspaper said. The French Tennis Federation (FFT) declined to confirm the report, but said in a statement: “The FFT is in contact with the international bodies, the ATP, WTA and ITF, and is waiting for the calendar to be confirmed by them.”Advertisement Promoted ContentBirds Enjoy Living In A Gallery Space Created For ThemWhat Happens To Your Brain When You Play Too Much Video Games?Who’s The Best Car Manufacturer Of All Time?5 Of The World’s Most Unique Theme ParksThe Best Cars Of All TimeCouples Who Celebrated Their Union In A Unique, Unforgettable WayThe Very Last Bitcoin Will Be Mined Around 2140. Read MoreThis Guy Photoshopped Himself Into Celeb Pics And It’s Hysterical6 Incredibly Strange Facts About Hurricanes8 Fascinating Facts About Coffee7 Ways To Understand Your Girlfriend BetterDid You Know There’s A Black Hole In The Milky Way? The FFT caused surprise in the tennis world by announcing in mid-March, just as France was going into lockdown because of the pandemic outbreak, that it was moving from its original May 24-June 7 slot to the September date. Read Also: UEFA open to seasons ending early due to COVID-19 If the tournament is delayed until September 27, it would give a two-week pause after the US Open, which is currently scheduled to finish on September 13. Wimbledon, which was to have been played from June 29 to July 12, has been cancelled. FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 center_img Loading… last_img read more

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USC’s reliance on adjuncts creates unique challenges

first_imgThere has long been a tension in higher education between full-time, tenure-track professors who have dedicated their lives to research and teaching, and part-time adjuncts, who typically take up teaching as a secondary career and don’t receive health or retirement benefits.From 1975 to 2009, the proportion of part-time faculty in U.S. higher education institutions increased from 24 to 41.1 percent, a trend the American Association of University Professors calls “the establishment of a subordinate tier of faculty members.”The number of adjuncts is high at USC, too — 33 percent of university faculty are part-time and have no tenure or tenure-track designation.A New York Times book review published in April describes adjunct professors as “holders of advanced degrees who are lured in by the prestige of college teaching, hired on a piecework basis, paid low wages and shut out of academic decision-making.”But Martin Levine, vice provost for faculty affairs, said that description does not typically apply to adjuncts at USC.“Many of these people have very active careers of their own,” Levine said. “They usually have marvelous experience and … are delighted to come in and work with students.”Organizations such as the American Association of University Professors condemn the increase in adjunct hires because they say it means more doctoral graduates are shouldering the burden of teaching without possibility for tenure.That ranking of positions has traction in English, according to Margaret Russett, a professor and chair of the English department.“A tenure-track job is the gold standard,” Russett said. “That’s what one would prefer, all things being equal.”Technically, USC’s English department employs no adjuncts; the division is between tenure-track and non-tenure-track full-time faculty, a practice Russett said the university encourages other departments to adopt.Many students do not realize that “adjunct” designates just one type of non-tenure-track faculty who do not have a long-term contract with USC. Other titles include lecturer, visiting professor and research professor, all of which the university can confer without offering the salary and benefits typically afforded to tenure-track hires.The tenure-track job as the “gold standard” is true in English, as well as most social science and humanities disciplines. But Sofus Macskassy, a professor who recently moved into a full-time position at the Viterbi School of Engineering’s Information Sciences Institute, said computer science and technology Ph.D. graduates are often indifferent to the tenure race.“[Computer scientists who take adjunct professorships] just keep their foot in the door, they get their secondary income, they get to keep [on top of] what’s going on in the research community,” Macskassy said.For years, Macskassy willingly worked as an assistant adjunct professor in computer science while holding a research position at a startup company. Though he always aimed to become a full-time professor, he also saw the industry-and-academia combination as ideal for recruiting outstanding students into the profession.In the computer science department, Macskassy said, adjuncts “don’t have any responsibilities. You can teach if you want to and you can do research if you want to, it’s basically an association.”Ted Ancona, an adjunct instructor of music industry, said the music school hires many instructors from outside to teach just one instrument. Ancona was himself a classical music recording engineer for KUSC when the university asked him to step in and teach a class about his niche specialty.“If you know everything about history you may focus on that, but in the cinema school or electronics or music industry, there’s a lot of development in the field you’re not caught up with [being in academia],” Ancona said.Adjuncts have been recipients of the prestigious Teaching and Mentoring Awards granted by the USC Parents Association, Levine said. The shame of not being tenured might change as tenured jobs disappear.“I don’t think this phenomenon [of tenure decline] is going to go away, and we’re all going to have to adjust to it,” Russett said.last_img read more

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Wimbledon to Rethink on-court Coaching Rules

first_imgThe American was incensed by the warning and was eventually docked a game for a third violation after calling Ramos a liar and a thief.Brook was in New York for the match, which ended with both players in tears and the stadium reverberating to the sound of booing from the crowd.His sympathies lay mainly with Ramos, with Brook asserting the pressure of the situation, as Williams sought to equal Margaret Court’s record of 24 Grand Slam singles titles, led her to lose her cool.He said: “People said to me, ‘Would that happen at Wimbledon?’ My first reaction is maybe it could, but actually I do wonder whether (it was) the uniqueness of the circumstances in New York.“Being in the stadium, it was really partisan. I could imagine the pressure on her being even greater than ever, and we all saw what happened. I think she was under a lot of pressure, I think he (Ramos) was doing his job and what unfolded, unfolded. It was not a good look for tennis.”The momentum seems to be towards allowing some form of coaching during matches, with everyone in tennis accepting coaches and players abuse the rules frequently and that there is a lack of consistency with how sanctions are enforced.The U.S. Open permitted players to talk to their coaches during qualifying and junior matches for a second year while the Australian Open and French Open are believed to be open to at least experimenting.Any move to allow it during main draw matches would need to be unilateral among the slams, and Wimbledon has so far been totally against it. But Brook is now keen to have a meeting before the end of the year to discuss the issue, although Wimbledon remains philosophically opposed.He said: “The situation is very confusing for everybody. Wimbledon and others think the time has come for an adult conversation across the sport to see where it goes. What we would like to learn from those who have conducted trials is, ‘OK, persuade us why it is a good idea’.“There is more unilateral behaviour and discord among the governing bodies than I’ve seen in the sport in 20 years and I think it would be great if tennis could do a better job of coming together and trying to figure things out and try to act in the best interests of tennis.“We (Wimbledon) are not necessarily the easiest of people to deal with. People might say, ‘Shall we all vote for coaching, it’s good for the sport’. We will say no, but if the rest of the sport say we want to do it and there are good reasons, then maybe Wimbledon should fit in.Share this:FacebookRedditTwitterPrintPinterest1EmailWhatsAppSkypeLinkedInTumblrPocketTelegram Chairman Philip Brook could be willing to rethink Wimbledon’s previously-staunch opposition to on-court coaching after branding the Serena Williams U.S. Open controversy “not a good look for tennis”.Williams was given her first code violation by umpire Carlos Ramos in the tempestuous final at Flushing Meadows earlier this month for illicit coaching from Patrick Mouratoglou in the stands.The Frenchman admitted on TV immediately after the match he was coaching but Williams, who never uses the on-court coaching breaks allowed on the WTA Tour, has maintained they have not discussed coaching signals.last_img read more

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