Rice U lab probes molecular limit of plasmonics

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center_img Luca Bursi (left) and Kyle Chapkin Return to article. Long DescriptionRice University applied physics graduate student Kyle Chapkin working with samples in a glove box at Rice’s Laboratory for Nanophotonics. (Photo by Jeff Fitlow/Rice University)“This study offers a window on the sometimes surprising behavior of collective excitations in few-atom quantum systems,” Halas said. “What we’ve learned here will aid our lab and others in developing quantum-plasmonic approaches for ultrafast color-changing glass, molecular-scale optoelectronics and nonlinear plasmon-mediated optics.”Halas is Rice’s Stanley C. Moore Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering and professor of chemistry, bioengineering, physics and astronomy, and materials science and nanoengineering. Nordlander is professor of physics and astronomy, electrical and computer engineering, and materials science and nanoengineering.Additional study co-authors include Grant Stec, Adam Lauchner, Nathaniel Hogan and Yao Cui, all of Rice. This research was funded by the Robert A. Welch Foundation.-30-High-resolution IMAGES are available for download at:http://news.rice.edu/files/2018/08/movie-21x6ugz.gifCAPTION: This animation of quantum mechanical simulations performed on a computer shows the plasmonic oscillations that occur in an anthanthrene anion when it is excited with a 576 nanometer wavelength laser. Positive (blue) and negative (red) oscillations in the induced charge density of electron plasma are shown atop the molecular structure. (Animation courtesy of Luca Bursi/Rice University)http://news.rice.edu/files/2018/08/0904_PLASMONIC-lbkc04-lg-w2m5db.jpgCAPTION: Luca Bursi (left) and Kyle Chapkin of Rice University’s Laboratory for Nanophotonics are probing the physical limits of excited electronic states called plasmons by studying them in organic molecules with fewer than 50 atoms. (Photo by Jeff Fitlow/Rice University)http://news.rice.edu/files/2018/08/0904_PLASMONIC-kc41-lg-25351s0.jpgCAPTION: Rice University applied physics graduate student Kyle Chapkin working with samples in a glove box at Rice’s Laboratory for Nanophotonics. (Photo by Jeff Fitlow/Rice University)http://news.rice.edu/wp-content/uploads/2015/12/1221_HALAS-058c-lg.jpgCAPTION: Naomi Halas is the Stanley C. Moore Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering and professor of chemistry, bioengineering, physics and astronomy, and materials science and nanoengineering at Rice University. (Photo by Jeff Fitlow/Rice University)The DOI of the PNAS paper is: 10.1073/pnas.1805357115A copy of the PNAS paper is available at www.pnas.org/cgi/doi/10.1073/pnas.1805357115.Related photonic research from Rice:Reimagining MRI contrast: Iron outperforms gadolinium — Aug. 22, 2018https://news.rice.edu/2018/08/22/reimagining-mri-contrast-iron-outperforms-gadolinium/Rice lab expands palette for color-changing glass — March 8, 2017http://news.rice.edu/2017/03/08/rice-lab-expands-palette-for-color-changing-glass/Rice’s ‘antenna-reactor’ catalysts offer best of both worlds — July 18, 2016http://news.rice.edu/2016/07/18/rices-antenna-reactor-catalysts-offer-best-of-both-worlds/Rice experts unveil submicroscopic tunable, optical amplifier — May 9, 2016http://news.rice.edu/2016/05/09/rice-experts-unveil-submicroscopic-tunable-optical-amplifier/Rice finding could lead to cheap, efficient metal-based solar cells — July 22, 2015http://news.rice.edu/2015/07/22/rice-finding-could-lead-to-cheap-efficient-metal-based-solar-cells/Rice researchers make ultrasensitive conductivity measurements — June 10, 2015http://news.rice.edu/2015/06/10/rice-researchers-make-ultrasensitive-conductivity-measurements-2/Rice scientists use light to probe acoustic tuning in gold nanodisks — May 7, 2015http://news.rice.edu/2015/05/07/rice-scientists-use-light-to-probe-acoustic-tuning-in-gold-nanodisks/This release can be found online at news.rice.edu.Follow Rice News and Media Relations via Twitter @RiceUNews.Located on a 300-acre forested campus in Houston, Rice University is consistently ranked among the nation’s top 20 universities by U.S. News & World Report. Rice has highly respected schools of Architecture, Business, Continuing Studies, Engineering, Humanities, Music, Natural Sciences and Social Sciences and is home to the Baker Institute for Public Policy. With 3,970 undergraduates and 2,934 graduate students, Rice’s undergraduate student-to-faculty ratio is just under 6-to-1. Its residential college system builds close-knit communities and lifelong friendships, just one reason why Rice is ranked No. 1 for lots of race/class interaction and No. 2 for quality of life by the Princeton Review. Rice is also rated as a best value among private universities by Kiplinger’s Personal Finance. To read “What they’re saying about Rice,” go to http://tinyurl.com/RiceUniversityoverview. AddThis Applied physics graduate student Kyle Chapkin working at a glove boxlast_img

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