Struggling economy affects job market

first_imgEven though the job market is challenging, Kevin Monahan, associate director of the Career Center, said he is optimistic for the graduating senior class.“When students say ‘It’s a bad market,’ I say, ‘someone’s getting hired today. Why can’t that be you?’” Monahan said. “There are opportunities out there. You just have to be assertive.”But some students say the effects of the poor economy have hit them hard.Senior Jim Quiniff, an aerospace engineering major, said his field of study isn’t translating well to the job market.“A lot of people [in this field] didn’t get jobs last year,” Quiniff said. “This leads to more competition.“Not a lot of companies are hiring.”Quiniff said he has been looking into the aircraft and space industries and even though he’s been searching for a job since the beginning of the school year, he said he has only had two interviews.Senior Alex Bodewig, a management consulting major, said she also felt the competition for jobs.“I was looking for any job in business,” she said. “Consulting requires lots of travel time, so I’m not sure if I want that.”Bodewig is from El Salvador, which makes her job search more difficult, spanning two different countries.“It takes a long time to find a job listing you’re interested in,” Bodewig said. “It’s also hard when you don’t hear back. The waiting is rough.”She said professors and the Career Center have been urging students to keep applying.“They said the market is rough, but looking up,” Bodewig said. “There have been people getting offers the last couple of weeks. It’s very last-minute.”Bodewig, who has an upcoming interview but no job offers yet, said the economic state is hitting many graduating students hard.“Companies don’t have the money to hire,” she said.The Career Center is helping bring companies to students, at least virtually, Bodewig said. She said video conferencing is helping bring more interviews in because companies don’t have to pay for travel expenses.Monahan said the Career Center works with students in all stages of the job hunt to help them find a job that is right for them.“The Career Center meets students where they are in the process,” Monahan said. “We help with every aspect.”Graduating senior Kate Callahan said she used help from the Career Center to land a job at Nielsen, one of the biggest marketing research companies in the world.Callahan said she received her job offer at the end of fall semester, but that wasn’t the case for many applying for jobs.“In the fall, companies didn’t know where they would be in the spring,” Callahan said. “There was a lot more stress and pressure on students.Callahan said the job market has been noticeably more competitive recently due to the economy.“There are fewer jobs out there,” Callahan said. “There are fewer offers. It’s really competitive.”Yet Monahan said he saw a broad list of companies looking at students for possible employees.“Across the board there was broad interest,” Monahan said. “There were companies from film and public relations to the traditional corporate field.”The Career Center’s most successful year-long venture was alumni-student networking, Monahan said.“Students should embrace networking,” Monahan said. “They are phenomenal resources to connect with people in many fields.”Despite the tough job market, Bodewig said she can see a silver lining.“I think a lot of people considered service or more school because of the tough market,” she said. “It forced people to consider other venues for their passions. They could go for their calling.”last_img read more

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Recent burglaries, home invasions plague off-campus students

first_imgOn Friday night, a burglar entered a student residence on N. St. Peter St. through an unsecured window. The burglar left with several laptops, iPods, game stations and cash. He or she also found car keys to a black SUV and drove away with the car, which belonged to one of the home’s residents. This robbery was the sixth to student residences in only four months. In those four months, there have also been two home invasions and four student robberies, according to reports from the South Bend Police Department (SBPD). In another recent case, a burglar forced an off-campus student to drive at gunpoint to different ATMs around the city and withdraw cash. The student said he was mugged twice before — once in Chicago and once on Napoleon St. near campus. “If there is anything that I take away from this robbery and previous muggings, it is that I need to stop being outside at like 4 a.m., which is roughly when each of these unfortunate incidents has occurred,” he said. The robber approached the student around 4 a.m. Sept. 27 at a Speedway gas station on the 2100 block of South Bend Avenue. He told the student he had a gun, and he forced the student to drive him to two different ATMs in downtown South Bend to withdraw cash, according to police reports. The student drove the man to several houses after he withdrew the money, police said. The student told police he was afraid to drive away each time the man got out of the car, but he eventually sped away from the robber when he walked far enough away from the vehicle. The student returned to his home and called police. Police arrested a suspect in the case, but he was later released. The Observer will not name the student because he was the victim of a crime. “I have lived off-campus now since mid-June, and while I never consciously feel unsafe, I recognize that I have to be more careful now than I have been the past three years,” he said. “As for my experience off-campus, my roommates and I are still trying to get a feel for how safe our neighborhood is. My roommate had a car window smashed about a month ago and had his iPod and XBox stolen … The people two houses away from us, all grad students, were sitting on their porch one day when two guys with guns made them go inside and give them their laptops.” Off-campus president Tess Fitzpatrick said these crimes demonstrate the need for more vigilance in students who live off campus. “One of the main issues has been during football games, people leave their doors unlocked or their windows unlocked, and it’s very accessible for people to come in,” Fitzpatrick said. “That’s usually the case for these robberies … You aren’t living on campus anymore. You can’t just leave your door unlocked.” Fitzpatrick said the SBPD has interacted more with students this year, trying to give them more tips about how to protect themselves and their property. “In your car, for instance, [they said] not to leave valuable objects out to be seen, so if you have a GPS, just hide it,” she said. “Get to know your neighbors too. That not only establishes a relationship, but they will look out for you when you are integrating yourself in the community.” Fitzpatrick sends “student watch” emails to the off-campus listserv with information about crime in the local area. Leaving the protection of campus can be an adjustment for many students, she said. “People don’t realize it’s such a transition moving off campus,” Fitzpatrick said. “In the campus community, stuff gets stolen sometimes but it’s a lot more student-community based, so they respond to one another more … Realize that you are not in a community of just students.” Fitzpatrick advised students to lock their doors at all times, even when one or more residents are in the home, and said using house alarm systems regularly is also important. “I think [these crimes are] a continuing trend, so this is something we’re trying to work on because we have been establishing a better relationship with the cops this year,” she said. “Now we are trying to focus on common sense safety things.” Sgt. Keri Kei Shibata is the crime prevention officer at Notre Dame, and she leads educational initiatives for both on- and off-campus students to help them learn about safety. “As for the crimes that students experience, I would say there has not been much of a change,” she said. “There have always been robberies and burglaries … most of them from unlocked doors or open windows.” Shibata said students need to take more initiative in their own safety educations. When planning to move off campus, students should make safety a priority in their housing search. “It can be a great thing but students need to understand that there is a lot more responsibility for one’s own safety when students live off campus that will require some inconveniences to make sure they are doing all the things they can to be safe,” Shibata said. She advised students to investigate the crime alerts and maps available through the off-campus website. “What I recommend is that when you have in mind a couple places that you are looking at … and you feel like this might be an organization you want to rent from, I would go to these crime maps and look through the maps for at least the last year and crime area that you are living,” Shibata also recommended checking the area during the day and at night to see what the environment has been like lately. “Safety has to be a priority, and building those good safety habits now will also be helpful down the road,” Shibata said.last_img read more

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SMC opens spring show

With a production advertised as “Not suitable for children, mothers, or the faint of heart,” the Saint Mary’s College Theatre Program’s spring production will be the ballyhoo burlesque women’s translation of “Lysistrata.” Mark Abram-Copenhaver, Saint Mary’s College theatre professor, said “Lysistrata” is a comedic account of one woman’s determination to bring an end to the Peloponnesian War. “It is a combination of burlesque, circus, ‘Looney Tunes,’ and stand-up comedy,” he said. Abram-Copenhaver said the piece was written by Aristophanes and was originally performed in ancient Greece. The main character, Lysistrata, persuades the Grecian women to withhold sexual privileges from their husbands in an attempt to negotiate peace. In the process, the women provoke a battle between the sexes in a male-dominated society. Abram-Cophenhaver said “Lysistrata” was the perfect choice for a women’s college because it is, and always has been, a women’s play. “All of the actors on stage will be played by women, or women in masks imitating the behavior of men. That’s part of the fun,” he said. “It makes light of men and men and women’s relationships.” Additionally, a play from ancient Greece gives the audience a different experience than a modern play, he said. Those watching the play gain an understanding of the culture of the time period it was written. “When the audience laughs at a joke, they are essentially laughing at a joke from 2,500 years ago. Even though it was a different time, it links us all together,” Abram-Copenhaver said. Senior Elizabeth Carian, who plays Lysistrata, said her character instigates events in the play. She said rehearsing antics for the performance is always enjoyable. “We’ve been rehearsing since mid-February and have really come together as a cast,” Carian said. “Everyday at rehearsal we discover something new, something outrageous or something hilarious.” Abram-Copenhayer said while the performance is engaging, is not family-friendly entertainment. “This play is naughty. It always has been and was written to be risqué and bawdy,” he said. “It is not for kids.” Performances will take place in Little Theatre, Moreau Center for the Arts, at 7:30 p.m., March 29 through 31 and at 2:30 p.m. on April 1. read more

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Contraception now available to ND employees

first_imgNotre Dame employees may now receive contraceptive coverage through the University’s third-party insurance administrator as of Jan. 1, in compliance with a U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) mandate.Nevertheless, the University is continuing its legal action against the mandate, which is part of the Affordable Care Act, with the hope of ending that coverage.Emily Hoffman The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit denied Notre Dame’s third request for relief from the mandate, which required nonprofit religious organizations to start to provide contraceptive services on New Year’s Day.Paul Browne, the University’s vice president for public affairs and communications, said Jan. 2 that Notre Dame advised its employees that its third-party administrator would cover contraceptives.“As part of an ongoing legal action, however, the program may be terminated once the University’s lawsuit on religious liberty grounds against the HHS mandate has worked its way through the courts,” Browne said.Hours before the mandate was set to take effect, Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor temporarily blocked enforcement of the mandate against an order of nuns, the Little Sisters of the Poor, and certain other Catholic nonprofit groups, according to The New York Times.A substantive ruling on the Little Sisters case is pending, but Browne said without a ruling by the full Supreme Court, Sotomayor’s order applies only to that particular case and not to Notre Dame.Browne said if Sotomayor rules in favor of the Little Sisters, Notre Dame might ask the Seventh Circuit to reconsider the University’s case. If she rules against the Little Sisters, Browne said, Notre Dame will continue its appeal as planned.Junior Mark Gianfalla, president of Notre Dame College Republicans, said his club supported the University’s lawsuit against the HHS mandate.“The College Republicans believe that Notre Dame’s lawsuit had standing and was a valiant effort by the University to thwart an unconstitutional encroachment of government into the arena of religious liberties,” Gianfalla said.The president of Notre Dame Right to Life, junior Erin Stoyell-Mulholland, said her club also stood behind the University’s litigation.“Women deserve better than abortion-inducing drugs and contraception,” she said.Junior Sean Long, co-president of College Democrats of Notre Dame, said formulating an official stance on the HHS mandate is one of his club’s priorities this semester.“We are currently organizing an issue briefing that presents both sides of the argument, and we will hold an inclusive conversation with many Democratic voices at Notre Dame,” Long said. “We hope to emerge with a clear articulation of Notre Dame College Democrats’ stance on the issue that takes into account the diverse voices of our Democratic community.”Tags: Affordable Care Act, Contraception, Health care, HHS Mandate, Little Sisters of the Poor, Notre Dame College Democrats, Notre Dame College Republicans, Notre Dame Right to Life, Paul Browne, University Lawsuitlast_img read more

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Librarian lectures on monk

first_imgDr. David Jenkins, Librarian for Classic, Hellenistic Studies and Linguistics at Princeton University, made the case for Byzantine Literature in his lecture in McKenna Hall Tuesday.Jenkins’ lecture was given as part of a series on classical studies to honor the legacy of the late Sabine MacCormack, a Notre Dame historian and classicist. During his time as a librarian at Notre Dame, Jenkins said he collaborated with MacCormack to purchase books for the Byzantine collection.Jenkins’ lecture was centered around the 11th century monk, philosopher and politician Michael Psellos.“Of all the writers of his time, no one was more responsible for the judgment and appreciation of Byzantine literature than Michael Psellos,” Jenkins said.Jenkins said Psellos was born to a prominent family, likely around 1018, in Constantinople. He worked for a number of Byzantine emperors and was known for his oratory abilities.“He excelled in orations and was reported to have recited the entire ‘Iliad’ while still in his youth,” he said.Since much of the information about Psellos comes from his own autobiographies, Jenkins said Psellos likely exaggerated the influence he acquired through political patronage.“As a philosopher, Psellos taught the emperors two things: Great deeds require great praises and great deeds require great philosophy,” Jenkins said. “In other words, Psellos would be the one to instruct the emperors on how to achieve great deeds through his philosophy.”Jenkins concentrated on Psellos’ philosophical interests in saying Byzantine literature ought to be encountered on its own terms and as more than a list of facts. Jenkins said literature of the Byzantine Empire has often been cast aside for its perceived lack of originality and its dependence on more highly-esteemed classical sources.“The literature these Byzantine writers produced has been regarded as unoriginal literature written in a dead language largely for sycophantic purposes,” he said. “But this assumes that the works they produced ought to be compared to their classical forefathers.”Encountering Byzantine literature on its own terms involves a certain paradox, Jenkins said. Normally, researchers try not to project their biases onto the past and stay close to primary sources, but encountering history on its own terms makes it difficult for researchers to avoid bias.Jenkins said Psellos operated in a similar frame of contradictions in the 11th century, focusing on the duality of Christ’s human and divine nature and devising a sophisticated treatment of the liar’s paradox.“Literature that aspires to something deeper than a grocery list does not necessarily need philosophical arguments in its defense, but it cannot do without the experience of a contradictory spark that drives its creation,” he said.Tags: Byzantine Empire, Byzantine Literature, David Jenkins, Iliad, McKenna Hall, Michael Pselloslast_img read more

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College, University confirm safety of students abroad after earthquake in Italy

first_imgSaint Mary’s and Notre Dame administrators have confirmed the safety of students studying abroad in Rome after a 6.2 magnitude earthquake hit 100 kilometers north of the city.Haleigh Ehmsen, media relations associate for the College, said in an email that 12 Saint Mary’s students arrived at John Cabot University on Wednesday, but were not on site during the earthquake. The students are enrolled in the State Department Smart Traveler Enrollment Program, and received an emergency message from the U.S. Embassy in Rome at 3:30 a.m. (Editor’s note: Ehmsen served as Saint Mary’s Editor for The Observer last term.)Ehmsen said Jennifer Zachman, faculty coordinator for study abroad programs at Saint Mary’s, sent an email out to check in with those in Rome and has not yet received a response from all students in the program.Tom Guinan, associate vice president for operations, said the University has no reason to believe any students would have been affected by the earthquake.Notre Dame students were scheduled to arrive in Rome on Wednesday, Guinan said, and the University has asked John Cabot University for confirmation that all students checked in safely. Guinan said students from the School of Architecture and students studying in Bologna are not expected to arrive in Italy until next week.According to communication from John Cabot University, the earthquake was felt in the city, but there was no damage to campus.Tags: CWIL, italy, John Cabot University, NDI, Rome, study abroadlast_img read more

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Campus groups seek Trump petition updates

first_imgTags: College Democrats, Commencement 2017, Commencement petition, diversity council, Donald Trump, Fr. John Jenkins More than a month after they submitted a petition asking University President Fr. John Jenkins not to invite President Trump to speak at this year’s Commencement, the Notre Dame College Democrats and Diversity Council are still waiting for an answer.Senior co-president of College Democrats Andrew Galo said the petition had roughly 3,600 signatures when it was delivered to Jenkins in December. Galo said the petition’s goal was only further reinforced with the new executive order Trump signed Friday, banning  travel from seven Muslim-majority countries.“Fr. Jenkins has already called on the President to rescind this hateful, bigoted and misguided order,” Galo said in an email. “We agree, and we hope Fr. Jenkins goes one step further in choosing a different Commencement speaker. We will certainly be more vocal until a decision is made.”Jenkins issued a statement Sunday urging Trump to rescind Friday’s executive order, which stopped visas from being issued to nationals of Iran, Iraq, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen for 90 days, and to refugees of Syria indefinitely. It also banned all refugee entries for 120 days, required a review of visa adjudication processes and stipulated refugees can be admitted on a case-by-case basis, especially if they are religious minorities. Senior Rachel Wallace, who is student union representative for Diversity Council, said at this point, she thinks it is unlikely for Jenkins to invite Trump. “A lot of the orders he’s signed, particularly this last one … [are] so against what Notre Dame stands for,” Wallace said. “The strongest point of content in our petition wasn’t necessarily that he goes against Catholic values — we were really focusing on student safety and inclusivity.”In the past, six presidents of the United States have spoken at Commencement during their terms, with four of them speaking at the first Commencement after their inauguration. Jenkins said he was undecided in continuing this tradition and extending the invitation to Trump in an interview with The Observer on Dec. 2, before the executive order was issued.Galo said neither Jenkins nor his staff have reached out to comment on the petition. However, he said, they have heard from students, alumni and community members who share the same views.Wallace said since the petition was submitted to Jenkins in December, she figured there was a slim chance of them getting a response before break. However, she said, she did expect that by now it would have been addressed, and although it hasn’t, she still remains hopeful for a response.“We are looking to do some kind of follow-up, whether it’s … a letter … or if it’s more of an action,” Wallace said. “We’ve just been focusing on that whoever the speaker is … they represent our values and that our students feel included. … We want a confirmation that he’s not our speaker, and we can move forward from there.”last_img read more

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Chainsmokers to perform at Purcell Pavilion

first_imgPurcell Pavilion will host its first concert since 2006 on April 27, 2018, when the Grammy Award-winning group The Chainsmokers will perform as part of IDEA Week, the University announced in a press release Thursday.“IDEA Week is a celebration of the entrepreneurial and creative energy, talent and leadership that are reinvigorating the South Bend-Elkhart region,” according to the release.One of the primary aims of the week-long event is to put “entrepreneurs, developers, makers, inventors, designers and investors” in contact with each other, and emphasize economic development in the local community.Event director Nick Swisher said The Chainsmokers concert will play an important role in this achieving this goal.“Including fun events, such as the performance by The Chainsmokers, is just one way to help attendees relax, unwind and meet other attendees,” he said in the release. “And maybe someone you meet becomes your next client, customer or business partner.”The concert is just one event of many that will comprise IDEA Week.“Other events include a comedy show by comedian Gabriel ‘Fluffy’ Iglesias; startup competitions offering prizes worth hundreds of thousands of dollars; speakers; workshops; and a TEDx event,” according to the release.The Chainsmokers were scheduled to perform on campus in February 2016 in a concert organized by Tilt, a crowd-funding platform. However, it was cancelled due to contract negotiation issues. According to a report in the South Bend Tribune, these disagreements centered on “a University policy prohibiting performers from having drugs, alcohol, weapons or armor.”The Chainsmokers’ music spans a wide array of styles. Their first album “Memories … Do Not Open” debuted at number one on the Billboard 200 chart in the United States. In 2018, the group was nominated for both Grammys and iHeart Music Awards. Tickets for the concert will go on sale Feb. 9.Tags: Concert, Grammy Awards, Idea Week, iHeart Music Awards, Purcell Pavilion, The Chainsmokerslast_img read more

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Saint Mary’s OCSE organizes election engagement campaign

first_imgThe Saint Mary’s Office of Civic and Social Engagement (OCSE) is spearheading a nonpartisan election engagement campaign inspired by the 2018 election season. The election engagement campaign consists of several events both at Saint Mary’s and within the wider tri-campus and South Bend community. The hope is to engage students through educational opportunities to increase self-efficacy in voting. The first of the events is a meeting on Sept. 10, aimed at students interested in becoming involved in the campaign.“It gives students the opportunity to participate in our democratic system — maybe for the first time — which is pretty amazing,” junior Annie Maguire, the single student worker on the initiative, said. “And it’s a powerful statement, I guess, when you cast your vote for the first time. We want to make sure as many students as possible do this.”Their biggest event in September will be their Rock the Vote campaign on Sept. 26. Maguire said the event will feature performances by Bellacapella, the Undertones and College President Jan Cervelli’s band. Maguire said the OCSE has several goals for this campaign, including making voting look less “daunting” to students.“The goal was to make [voting] as stress-free and accessible to everyone as possible,” she said. “And for the election season this semester it’s really important students are not only engaged, but informed on the different issues that could affect their vote.”In order to enact their goals, Maguire said the OCSE has resources available for students that need transportation.“At Saint Mary’s there are posters around the schools that say the dates and times of each event, where they’re located, when and on that is a link where they can sign up,” she said. “You can actually register if you don’t have your own car if you want to go across town for one of these events. The OCSE provides transportation. There is a form you can fill out by visiting the OCSE as well as just emailing them.”The events are of a wide variety, not built around a singular political group. Rather, the goal is to educate the entire spectrum, Maguire said.“As far as we know we are trying to get events that could be of interest to people across the whole political spectrum,” she said. “Our goal is to be nonpartisan, host events and [connect] events that are issue-based so people can really educate themselves on issues that could affect their vote in one way or the other.”Maguire noted the reasons why voting, becoming involved and educating yourself are so important for students in this election cycle.“It important all of our voices get heard,” she said. “We are a new generation of voters and our voices matter so much in the political sphere nowadays. Voting for the first time is the exercising of that power of our representation on a national level, which I think needs to be recognized more highly.”Getting students to the polls is necessary for representation to be acknowledged, Maguire said. “Trying to increase our representation in the voting polls is so important because we need diverse voices, we need women, we need people who are underrepresented groups in order to have outcomes we are satisfied with,” Maguire said. The election engagement campaign speaks to the significance of each voting-age individual participating in the political process, Maguire said. “As students at Saint Mary’s but also as young people living in the United States, I think a lot of the time people underestimate the power of constituents,” she said. “But the reality is that our voices really do have an impact on our legislators, on the people who are representing us in Congress and even on a global scale … Emphasizing that point as much as we can and encouraging people to participate in this process is so essential in keeping this process going and running smoothly.”Tags: 2018 elections, 2018 midterms, Office of Civic and Social Engagement, votinglast_img read more

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Audubon Hosting Nature Photography Contest

first_imgImage by Rory Pollaro/WNYNewsNow.JAMESTOWN – The Audubon Community Nature Center in Jamestown is now accepting submissions for its 2020 Nature Photography Contest.Categories include:Wildlife Portraits: any wild animal, no photos of animals in captivity, such as pets, zoos, or rehab animals.Macro Abstracts: anything that is natural/wild such as flowers, insects, leaves, water droplets, eyes/feathers of animals, close-up textures in nature, etc.Habitats and Landscapes: places that any wild animals live in and/or waterfalls, sunsets, mountains, etc.Winners in both the adult, ages 18 or older, or out of high school, and youth, ages 8 to 18, or still in high school, divisions in all three categories will each receive a $200 cash prize.Center officials say Alex Shipherd will judge the submissions. The winning photographs and 12 finalists, six youth and six adults, will be displayed indefinitely on the contest website along with the photographer’s name and city.The Audubon will print the winning photographs for exhibit in the Nature Center.Deadline for submission of photographs is Sunday, June 28. Full details of the competition as well as images of previous winners and finalists can be found at ACNCPhotoContest.com.There is a $15 entry fee. The winners will be announced in mid-July. Share:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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