100% Rye Wholegrain Loaf

first_imgThis classic loaf manages to be both incredibly simple to make and very difficult to get perfect.The challenge lies in not over-cooking the grains; that way they absorb moisture during the final bake and then release it again during the few days the loaf is left to sit wrapped before selling.Use fine rye flour for the dough, available from Shipton Mills and other millers, as most of the sticky gluten in rye flour is contained in the husk rather than the endosperm, and rye flour that has been bolted to remove the bran will bake to a 100% rye loaf with a less sticky crumb.Makes 5 pieces at appx 575 raw weight, to bake to 5 small 400g tin loaves1.370kg cooked rye grains (see below)0.450kg rye sponge or leaven (see below)0.400kg water 0.700kg light rye flour 0.020kg salt 0.090kg honeyFor the cooked grainsCover the grains with water and simmer for 15 minutes then drain and cover with water, beer, cider or white wine and leave in a cool place overnight.For the leavenEither use a naturally fermented sour mixture of equal quantities fine rye flour and water, left to rise overnight, or use 250g fine rye flour mixed with 250g cold water and a pinch of yeast and leave this overnight in a cool place before use.MethodDrain the grains well (discard the soaking liquid) and place all the ingredients together in a small upright mixer, or mix by hand until you have an evenly combined grey paste.As rye flour does not contain extensible gluten there is no need to work the dough, and all that is needed is the shortest mix to combine the dough.Line 5 very clean 1lb loaf tins (or similar) with non-stick baking parchment, as the acidity in the dough can take on greenish black marks from the tin, and evenly divide the dough between them. Pack the dough down evenly, banging the tins on the end of the table to remove any gas bubbles.Cover the tins, and leave to rise for 1 hour (if using a commercial yeast sponge) or 3-4 hours (if using a naturally fermented rye leaven) until risen by 30%-50%.As the dough will bake into a dense-grained loaf like pumpernickel, you don’t want too much lift, as this will cause the loaf to crack when sliced.Preheat the deck to 200°C (top and bottom, no steam), cover the tops of the tins with greased foil, and bake for 30 minutes.Then lower the temperature (175°C top and bottom) and bake for a further 30 minutes.Then reduce the heat to 140°C (top and bottom) and bake for a further 1-1½ hours, removing the foil for the last 30 minutes to colour the upper surface.Remove from the tins to cool, then wrap well individually in oiled brown paper or waxed paper tied snuggly with string. Leave at room temperature or cooler for 48 hours before slicing.last_img read more

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Brown flour boost on Carrs’ birthday

first_imgCarrs Flour Mills is celebrating 175 years in the business by opening a £500,000 brown flour blending plant.MD Duncan Monroe told British Baker that increased sales of wholemeal and brown bread had prompted the investment. “It gives us better quality wholemeal and brown flours, and also enables us to add ingredients such as bran with a greater degree of accuracy, which is what customers want.”It won’t result in huge growth for the business as we’re pretty busy anyway, but our product mix will better reflect what’s happening out there in the supermarkets and craft bakeries.”The company celebrated its anniversary by inviting 800 guests, including staff, former employees and consumers, to a range of events at its Carlisle base, where they had the chance to look around the 1904 steam engine which used to drive the mill.The business was founded in 1831 by Jonathan Dodgson Carr who set up the flour mills and Carrs Water Table Biscuits (since bought by United Biscuits).Said Monroe: “A lot of planning went into the events and we were keen to involve former staff – we think he would have approved.”last_img read more

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The Bradman Lake Group

first_imgThe Bradman Lake Group (Bristol, Avon) has launched an infeed and form, fill and seal flowrapper combination that enables large-volume confectionery manufacturers to pack bar products in continuous operations at speeds of up to 1,000 ppm. Key to its performance is a high-tech row distribution system, which accepts and aligns bakery confectionery bars into a new high-speed Flowtronic flowrapping machine. The system features a height-adjustable, single-belt feeding process which reduces product transfer by 50%, says the firm.last_img

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The Richemont Club of Great Britain Annual Competition

first_imgBakers’ Fair North West was such a success that the Richemont Club of Great Britain attracted over 300 entries into the 19 individual classes held on the day. It also saw the launch of a live competition to win the President’s Cup.The Richemont Club has a membership spread right across the country, representing some of the most innovative and creative bakery businesses and individuals in Europe.The annual competition has rapidly become one of the most prestigious and fiercely-contested in the UK and its past winners represent the crème de la crème of British talent.The competition is open to Club members and staff within member businesses. To stimulate interest, staff members within one business are also allowed to compete against each other. But to help keep the classes open, only the highest-placed from any one business can count towards the class total.This year, in another exciting development, the prestigious celebration cake category will undergo a few key changes to keep the excellent competitors on their collective toes and cake stands (see panel).Last year, Chester-based P&A Davies was named best craft bakery chain, scooping the Richemont Club 2007 Trophy at the Club’s annual competition, with the six-shop chain beating off stiff competition from Manchester-based Slattery Patissier & Chocolatier in second place, and Chatwins of Nantwich in third place.The Best in Show prize went to a multiseed loaf baked by Martin Ormisher of Preston-based Glovers Bakery.This year the judges are hoping for, and confident of getting, an equally exceptional standard of entries.—-=== List of provisional classes ===== Section One – Milling & Baking Trophy ==Class 1 Three Sausage Rolls (puff pastry)Class 2 Three Meat Pasties (one variety)Class 3 One Vegetarian ProductClass 4 One Quiche Lorraine (max 150mm diameter)== Section Two – Rank Hovis Trophy ==Class 5 One Brown Tin Loaf (400g)Class 6 One Multigrain Cob (400g)Class 7 One White Plaited Loaf (400g)== Section Three – BakeMark Trophy ==Class 8 Four Fresh Creams (2 varieties)Class 9 Four Danish Pastries (2 varieties)Class 10 Four Christmas Fancies (2 varieties)Class 11 Four Puff Pastries Unfilled (2 varieties)== Section Four – Renshaw Trophy ==Class 12 One Novelty Celebration Cake (max 30cm board)Class 13 One Marzipan/Sugar Paste Model (max 250g)Class 14 One Character Biscuit (gingerbread or shortbread)Class 15 Almond Goods (three items, one variety)== Section Five – British Sugar Trophy ==Class 16 One decorated Christmas Cake (max 30cm board)Class 17 One Christmas Pudding (max 800g)Class 18 One Chocolate Log (max 18cm long)== Section Six – British Baker Trophy ==Open to all Young Bakers 21 and underClass 19 Four Fruit scones (max 65g each)Class 20 One Oven Bottom Loaf (400g)Class 21 One Round Pizza (max 150mm dia)== Section Seven – Invitation Only – Live Demonstration ==One Celebration Cake: six groups of two people will each go head to head, competing against each other. In a spin on last year, all entrants will have to use the same ingredients, truly testing their creative skills.Richemont Club competition Timings* Show times 09:00-16:00* All entries displayed by: 10:30 Judging: 11:00 & 13:00* Live demonstration/competition: 11:00-14:00* Prize-giving ceremony: 14:30last_img read more

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Greenhalgh’s extends its van service

first_imgGreenhalgh’s craft bakery has expanded its business-to- business delivery service into Wigan, with the addition of a third catering van.The Bolton-based firm, has been delivering to the Bolton area for the last 18 months. Due to numerous enquiries from Wigan companies in the industrial and commercial parks in the area, the bakery decided to extend this side of the business. “We now deliver to over 100 businesses,” said Greenhalgh’s production director David Smart.The service operates from 7.30am until 2.00pm, five days a week. Products available include pies, pasties and sandwiches.last_img

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National Craft Bakers’ Week resources now online

first_imgNational Craft Bakers’ Week is fast approaching and resources for teachers are now available here, for bakers to promote the role of the baker within their community. Running from 8-13 June, the aim of the week is to raise the profile of independent craft bakers – ‘The Shop That Never Sleeps’ – and, in doing so, capture increased consumer spend. The week will also be promoted to 22,000 state and independent primary schools.Recipes for gingerbread men and bread rolls, as well as a story suitable for Key Stage 1 children, on how a baker makes bread, are available to download from the website. There is also a video, ‘The Shop That Never Sleeps’, and accompanying teachers’ notes.The aim is to encourage schools and craft bakeries to link together to show children how the bread and cakes are made. Craft bakeries of all sizes and location are encouraged to take part in the week, which promotes the important commercial and social role that craft bakers play in their local communities.The activity is spearheaded by the National Association of Master Bakers and has been developed with a group of key industry players: British Baker magazine, Bako, Bakels, BakeMark, BFP Wholesale, California Raisins, Macphie, Marriage’s, Puratos, The Reynard Group and The Scottish Association of Master Bakers.A PR press kit will be distributed by British Baker with point-of-sale material and advice on how to promote participation in May.For more information, as well as downloadable point-of-sale material, click here.last_img read more

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Cupcake champion sees sales take off

first_imgThe winner of National Cupcake Week’s second Cupcake-off to find the country’s best cupcake baker is fighting to keep up with demand, having seen sales rocket by 50% following his win last month.David Bennett of The Sunshine Bakery in North Allerton, Leeds, has been inundated with media requests after scooping the title of Cupcake Champion of Great Britain. “I’ve been on TV, radio, newspapers the full spectrum,” he said. “After we appeared on our local evening news on Tuesday, that pushed sales up big-time. I’ve had to work extra hours to keep up with demand. It’s been the best competition ever, and I’ve already got an idea for next year’s entry.”The week itself, which took place on 13-19 September, was a runaway success on social media websites, and was the second most tweeted subject on Twitter for two days running.Read the full review of National Cupcake Week:>>A frenzy of frostinglast_img read more

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Healthy bites added to line

first_imgGenesis Distributors has added two new products to its range of healthy cookies, suitable for the food-to-go market.The Voortman grab ’n’ go two-cookie packs are now available in No Added Sugar Chocolate Chip and No Added Sugar Oatmeal varieties. The products use a sugar substitute called Maltitol, which offers 75-90% sweetness of sugar and does not compromise on flavour, according to the company.Steven Payne, partner, Genesis Distributors, said: “Voortman’s Flax Seed and No Added Sugar cookies bring something unique and exciting to the ’food-to-go’ market certainly the healthier snacking option with no cholesterol and no trans fats.”Its existing Original Flax Seed Omega 3 cookies are priced from 60p, with all products low in saturated fat and containing 750mg of ALA Omega-3 Fatty Acids.last_img read more

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