Edinburgh confirm side for Cardiff rematch

first_imgStarting XV:15 Chris Paterson14 Lee Jones13 Nick De Luca12 James King11 Tim Visser10 Greig Laidlaw (C)9 Mike Blair1 Allan Jacobsen2 Ross Ford3 Geoff Cross4 Grant Gilchrist5 Sean Cox6 David Denton7 Roddy Grant8 Netani TaleiReplacements:16 Steven Lawrie17 Kyle Traynor18 Jack Gilding19 Esteban Lozada20 Ross Rennie21 Phil Godman22 Matt Scott23 Tom Brown LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS CARDIFF, WALES – DECEMBER 09: Jamie Roberts (L) of Cardiff holds onto Tim Visser (R) of Edinburgh during the Heineken Cup Pool Two match between Cardiff Blues and Edinburgh at the Cardiff City Stadium on December 9, 2011 in Cardiff, Wales. (Photo by Michael Steele/Getty Images) Jamie Roberts tackles Tim Visser during last week’s Heineken cup clashVersatile duo Mike Blair and Greig Laidlaw will steer the Edinburgh Rugby back-line against Cardiff Blues in round four of the Heineken Cup at Murrayfield Stadium tomorrow (kick-off 8pm).Two wins from three in Heineken Cup Pool 2 means Edinburgh Rugby are just three points behind this weekend’s opponents, who leapfrogged Edinburgh into the Pool’s top spot in the reverse fixture last Friday (25-8).Now, with home advantage, the capital club have the chance to redress the Pool positions, with a win capable of restoring Edinburgh to the top spot with two matches remaining – Racing Metro away followed by London Irish at Murrayfield.The selection of Blair and Laidlaw is the only change in the Edinburgh Rugby back-line, while two personnel changes have been made in the pack – Grant Gilchrist and Netani Talei coming in for Esteban Lozada and Stuart McInally in the second and back-row.Talei’s introduction means there’s no room for McInally in the match-day 23, with Ross Rennie retaining the back-row replacement berth, while Lozada takes Steven Turnbull’s place on the bench. Talei, who started and scored in the club’s last home Heineken Cup match against Racing Metro, said: “Everyone’s looking forward to this game, the boys are confident and have been focussed on this match since we left Cardiff on Saturday. It’s a big, big game for us.“Cardiff have the ability to slot points from pretty much anywhere within 50 metres so we can’t afford to give away cheap penalties. We have to tackle the basics first at the ruck and the tackle area – that’s what Cardiff are very good at. If we put our focus there first and give our backs the go forward we’re capable of scoring tries from anywhere around the park.”Other notable inclusions see centre Matt Scott return from a hip injury sustained in the side’s 48-47 win over Racing Metro, while the experienced Phil Godman provides the half-back replacement option for Laidlaw and Blair from the bench.last_img read more

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England’s back-row headache for Stuart Lancaster

first_imgIn the August issue of Rugby World, columnist Martin Corry asked if Robshaw was right to captain England, with Kvesic looking like the real deal at seven and Tom Wood and Tom Croft there at six. Certainly Lancaster must be aware of this aspect – Corry was an intelligent player and knows his back-row play, but this is something impossible for any England fan to ignore – but he must still compare form and value to the team over the coming weeks, before he plumps for his starters in his head.The World’s worst trophy?: Lancaster and Wood celebrateTom Wood is the man who would be captain, if you ask some fans. However, in order to make any changes that alter the composition of the team, Kvesic has to be burning down grounds and dominating every openside opposite him.What cannot be ignored is the potential for a back-row partnership at Gloucester between Kvesic and the stand-out No8 for England, Ben Morgan. If they share a telepathic link and team up to boss the Premiership, it will be hard to ignore Kvesic. Then the idea of moving Robshaw to six comes in and he has to worry about finding room for Wood and Croft. If Kvesic does OK, without making himself impossible to ignore, he is a safe bench option. What are Lancasters plans for 2015?Whatever it is, he will have a headache all the way there. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS <> on June 15, 2013 in Buenos Aires, Argentina. All eyes on him: Questions are being spun out about whether Chris Robshaw is the man to lead England to RWC2015By Alan DymockIT’S NOT long until the Aviva Premiership season starts and we’ve only just stopped nursing our British and Irish Lions hangovers. However, with the start of the domestic season come renewed questions for the England national side.In autumn England face Tests against Australia, Argentina and New Zealand. They are stern challenges against Rugby Championship opposition, of course, and a different proposition than experiences in recent memory would suggest, with New Zealand set to enjoy Championship crushing form, Australia being a different beast to the one that broke England last season and Argentina much stronger than the side that faced England in the summer tour.A serious contender: Matt KvesicCome autumn England will want to build for Rugby World Cup 2015 as well.So the first few games of the Premiership become significant for Stuart Lancaster. Now is the time to try combinations and push players who he reckons will be his starters for the World Cup. It looks like Marland Yarde could be tested with Tom Varndell to see who plays with the likes of Christian Wade, with the options as exciting as they are risky for spectators’ hearts, but the real headache for Lancaster as he looks into the first few rounds of action in the league will be his back-row.Captain Chris Robshaw has penned a new deal with Harlequins, anchoring him in England’s capital until 2016, and the side have steadily progressed under his and Lancaster’s watch. Yet there are more and more calls coming in for Matt Kvesic to become England’s openside, as an out-and-out seven.last_img read more

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Who should succeed Eddie Jones as England coach?

first_imgEddie Jones has three years left on his England deal but talk of who will succeed him is doing the rounds and Premiership bosses could be left out in the cold Baxter is right – he usually is – but we will probably find a foreigner being given the England job when it becomes available. I bet the RFU are hoping his name is Eddie Jones and they can persuade him to do the reverse ferret.For the latest Rugby World subscription offers, click here. Cockerill has experience of how the All Blacks are doing things and has New Zealanders Aaron Mauger and Scott Hansen on his staff at Welford Road. But that looks like a one-way street; no Englishman could get a job with the world champions.Long stint: Richard Cockerill has been coaching at Leicester since 2004. Photo: Getty Images“I work with two Kiwis and they have a very defined structure within the New Zealand Rugby Union to develop their coaches,” Cockerill added. “They have a pathway for them to step up; taking ITM Cup jobs as assistants or head coaches, to then take Super Rugby jobs and if you look at New Zealand, they probably have half-a-dozen coaches who could step into Steve Hansen’s shoes.“Aaron took the job at Leicester with the blessing of the Canterbury union, because the New Zealand Rugby Union know he is going to come back and share all those experiences he has had, and he is a 35-year-old who will be a part of the next generation, or two generations’ time, when he gets to his fifties.“I don’t know the answer. Ian Ritchie seems to have the question, but he doesn’t seem to know the answer. He’s the chief exec of the union. Maybe he should have the answers.“The impression I’ve been given is that if you are an U16, U18 or U20 coach at the RFU, from that group they will find the next person who will go through and coach England. But generally, those are guys who have been sacked from the Premiership.”As Mallinder says: “The southern hemisphere are pretty lucky – their coaches can come here and get good experience. I don’t think it’s quite as easy to go the other way.”Baxter also made a good point when he said the RFU don’t know if appointing an experienced Premiership coach works because they have never tried it.Chief experience: Exeter’s Rob Baxter worked with England on the 2013 tour to Argentina. Photo: Getty Images“Where is this example of an established Premiership coach failing as the England coach?” asks Baxter. “That’s the counter argument. Not to talk about myself, but guys like Richard Cockerill and Jim Mallinder – there are Premiership coaches with eight, nine or ten years of success. There are guys who’ve played and managed in top European competitions and have managed countless international players.“Not one of them has been the England coach, so where’s the failure that says that guys must go away and get international experience? It’s like they’re arguing about something they’ve never even tried to do. Until that failure happens, why try to find all the issues for it?” Succession plan: Eddie Jones is due to step down as England coach after RWC 2019. Photo: Getty Images center_img From the day Eddie Jones arrived at Twickenham on his white charger to rescue English rugby before Christmas, it has always been known that he will be off to watch cricket in Barbados after the 2019 World Cup.Unless he does a massive reverse ferret on that one, and gives up the hammock and cocktails, he will need to be replaced – but who by and is the Aviva Premiership a decent breeding ground for England coaches? Not according to the RFU apparently, and some of the blokes working in the league are not impressed.A personal view is the RFU should tell Rob Baxter he’s got the job from 2019, and get him on the summer tour to Argentina next year, but they haven’t taken any notice of me in two decades so that one is probably down the gurgler. That is unless they can persuade Jones to change his mind.The RFU would prefer the next coach to be an Englishman, although he doesn’t have to be. But the new boss must have international experience, which rules out a few highly experienced Premiership coaches and directors of rugby, and will probably leave the union in a panic when Jones goes unless one of his assistants steps up. It also throws a light on what the RFU are doing to develop English coaches compared to other countries – particularly New Zealand.Forward march: Billy Vunipola on the attack for England against Australia in June. Photo: Getty ImagesNigel Melville, now the RFU’s director of professional rugby, said: “I think it’s proved that just being a Premiership coach does not necessarily make you a good international coach. We need to give our coaches a menu of opportunities, not just day-to-day coaching in the Premiership. It isn’t going to necessarily create the next England coach.”In English club rugby there are a few Englishmen with international experience. Sale’s Steve Diamond coached Russia and the Saxons, Jim Mallinder and Dorian West at Northampton were involved with the Saxons, as was Exeter’s Ali Hepher in the summer, along with Saints’ Alan Dickens, and Baxter, boss at the Chiefs, coached on the England tour to Argentina in 2013 where he was popular with the squad.Andy Robinson, at Bristol, is probably the most experienced internationally – he has actually done the England job – while Trevor Woodman at Gloucester has worked with the Wallabies and Graham Rowntree is recovering from his international experiences at Harlequins.Test level: Bristol’s Andy Robinson has coached England and Scotland. Photo: Getty ImagesOf the directors of rugby only Diamond, Baxter and Mallinder have had a brush with the international game, so that rules out some pretty big contenders.Richard Cockerill, DoR at Leicester, is one of them. He has been coaching at Leicester for over a decade but rarely gets a mention when the top job comes up and is scratching his head at the system.“I joined Leicester back in 2004 (as a coach),” says Cockerill. “I joined the academy and ended up in this role, and I’ve had no help whatsoever from the RFU, in terms of career development or coaching development. I’ve just worked it out with my other coaches and players, and found my own way to this point.“A lot of that stuff gets done by luck rather than judgment. Do I have to go to Clermont or Toulouse or go and coach the Sunwolves to prove that I can coach? I can understand that their preference is to have international experience, but what exactly is international experience of coaching? Steve Diamond should probably get it then because he’s coached Russia.“I don’t know what the RFU are doing to develop young English coaches, to take that next step.” LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

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New Year, New You: a recipe from extreme chef Kiran Jethwa

first_imgAdd the salt to the oats, then add the milk and cook in the microwave. I prefer my porridge to still have a bit of texture so I don’t fully cook the oats.Allow to cool a little.Add the grated coconut, mashed banana and grated apple.Finish with chia seeds and roughly crushed nuts just before eating so the retain their crunchy texture.You can add a honey to this if it’s not sweet enough, but resist the temptation if possible.Chefs Tip: Keep your grated coconut ready in the fridge in a sealed container, it will keep for up to a week. Your nuts can also be pre-crushed and kept ready to speed things up if you hit snooze too many times.Extreme Food with @ChefKiranJethwa returns to Channel 4 in 2017. Here is a great breakfast recipe to kick off your transformation:Sugarless, reduced oats, Power Packed Breakfast Porridge½ cup oats½ cup semi skimmed milkpinch of salt1tbsp toasted crushed almonds1 tbsp toasted crushed cashews½ mashed banana½ grated green apple2 tablespoons grated fresh coconut1 teaspoon chia seedsMethod LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS I was asked to offer advice for the keen player who has let themselves go and wants to get a bit of their spark back. So my first advice to you, before I give you a recipe, would be to give up the smoking. I’m not going to preach about this, as I am sure you are well aware but there are a good fist full of reasons why this will make you a better player, and a healthier person.Let’s assume this is your first step, and you will encounter the inevitable need to binge on food while you get through a tough time giving up smoking. There is nothing wrong with this and nothing to worry about, so long as you ‘binge’ on the right stuff. More on that in a second.Besides the smoking advice here is something that really worked for me. I gave up 2 simple things whilst trying to lose weight and get fit about three years ago and it worked extremely well. One of them was alcohol. Try going a whole month or more without a drink, then when you achieved your goals drink in moderation. I generally don’t drink during the week and have a couple on the weekend and this suits me fine. This is from a person who has never lost a downing competition!Extreme eats: Jethwa has appeared in Chanel 4’s Extreme Food and Food UnwrappedThe other thing is refined sugar. This sounds simple but when you look at how much food we eat that actually contains refined sugar it becomes more difficult. There is the obvious sugar in your tea/coffee, this can be replaced with good sweeteners to ease the transition. Then the sweets, chocolates, cakes and biscuits are obvious no-nos. Other less obvious culprits are white bread, processed cereals, ready meals, sauces like ketchup, brown sauce and relishes. These are full of refined sugar.When it comes to tea/snack time and you feel peckish there are lots of really good options to replace the not-so-good ones. I get stuck into quite a lot of nuts particularly toasted almonds and cashews – these are a great replacement to a biscuit with your tea or coffee. Have ready to hand plenty of carrot sticks, green beans, edamame, toasted sun flower seeds, (the list goes on) that are delicious, packed with protein and vitamins and really will help with your dietary challenges.With the framework of this diet working for you, you can go ahead and eat good portions of all the foods that are well documented to be good for you. Things that should always be on your menu – eggs, fish (particularly salmon), green vegetables (particularly broccoli & spinach), beans and pulses, brown rice, chicken or turkey, oats, fruit, sweet potatoes, yams.center_img To tie in with the ‘New Year, New You’ section of the February 2017 issue of Rugby World magazine, chef Kiran Jethwa – who represented Kenya at rugby – offers you some eating advice On the hoof: Chef Kiran Jethwa in action as a centre in Kenya last_img read more

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Tyrrells Premier 15s inspiring next generation

first_img“The tipping point has been reached in women’s sport and it’s hugely exciting. If I was a young girl getting into team sport now, I’d be so excited because of the platform of five quality team sports who’ve all been successful.”Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. CAPTAIN FANTASTIC @saracenswomen skipper @lotteclapp slices through the Quins defence and scores Watch the #Premier15sFinal LIVE on @skysports or on https://t.co/CWGtvVEgYP pic.twitter.com/AP97isqtGd— Tyrrells Premier 15s (@Premier15s) April 29, 2018There’s no doubt the Premier 15s, a ten-team tournament set up this season and receiving £2.4m of investment from the RFU over three years, has helped develop greater strength in depth for the England national team, while the players are benefiting from better off-field support in terms of coaching, strength and conditioning, medical assistance and so on.While professional contracts are set to return for England’s 15-a-side players in the lead-up to the 2021 World Cup, it is still likely to be several years before players are paid at club level. It may well be that semi-pro deals are introduced first as the key will be to make such a financial commitment sustainable and at the moment the clubs don’t generate enough money to do that.Still, Wasps director of rugby Giselle Mather has been impressed by the rise in standards in the first season of the new league and points out that while 30 players may have benefited from pro deals last year ahead of the World Cup, the RFU’s investment is now benefiting 600 players across the clubs.Packed stand: The Harlequins and Saracens teams run out for the final (Getty Images)Mather, who is one of only three women to have the RFU’s Level 4 coaching qualification along with Susie Appleby and Jo Yapp, believes this is an exciting time for women’s team sport in the country.“With the success in hockey, netball, rugby, cricket and football, team sport for females is cool,” says Mather. “Female sport is good to watch – it’s different but it’s really competitive. And we’re bloody good at it in this country, with world champions and gold medallists all over the place. Tyrrells Premier 15s inspiring next generationGiven the energy she had just expended in the Tyrrells Premier 15s final, her succession of powerful carries ensuring Harlequins were far more competitive in the second half against Saracens, Shaunagh Brown may well have wanted to head to the changing rooms for a rest after the final whistle, especially as her efforts had ultimately been in vain.Instead the Harlequins flanker was happy to catch up with some of the 2,057 fans who had headed to Ealing Trailfinders’ ground on Sunday afternoon for the inaugural Premier 15s final, which Saracens won 24-20.One particularly telling moment came when a handful of Leek U15 players, who had been involved in a national final of their own earlier in the day, surrounded Brown and peppered her with questions. A few minutes later they walked away smiling, talking about how nice she was and clearly inspired by the conversation.Similar encounters happened around the touchline after the trophy presentation, players catching up with friends and family as well as those who had simply come to watch a game of rugby. All would have left feeling entertained for the match had plenty of drama and skill, and Quins’ second-half comeback meant the result was in the balance right until the end.Show of power: Shaunagh Brown tries to make ground against Saracens (Getty Images)Saracens prop Hannah Botterman, who was both a try-scorer and try creator in the final, summed it up well when she said: “To have this many people at a domestic women’s game is fantastic.”Her captain Lotte Clapp also crossed the whitewash, cutting a brilliant line to take a pass from Zoe Harrison and score under the posts, and the wing is hopeful that the women’s game will continue to make strides forward.“Lifting the trophy was the best feeling ever,” she said. “For the people who came to watch, hopefully we’ve got them excited and looking forward to next year, so it grows and grows. That’s what we want for women’s rugby.“The game brings so much to me, it gives me so much confidence. It’s a great sport to be involved in and we want more people playing it and enjoying it. It’s very special.” Inaugural winners: Saracens celebrate with the Premier 15s trophy (Getty Images) LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS After Saracens’ success in the inaugural Tyrrells Premier 15s final, Rugby World reflects on the impact of the new women’s competition 27′ HAR 3 – 10 SARlast_img read more

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Hotshot: Bristol and England U20 hooker Will Capon

first_imgThe Bears front-rower has caught the eye in the Premiership this season On the ball: Bristol Bears Will Capon in Premiership Rugby Cup action (Getty Images) Hotshot: Bristol and England U20 hooker Will CaponDate of birth 12 Oct 1999 Born Bristol Club Bristol Bears Country England Position HookerWhere did you first play rugby? For Winscombe RFC, aged seven to 16. I also played for Bristol Grammar (School) from 12 through to 18, and got picked up by Bristol Academy at 13. Along the way, I played England U16, U18, U20.Did you play other sports? I captained hockey at BGS at various points; until 15 I played rugby, hockey and cricket but then rugby became all-consuming.What positions have you played? Centre until age ten, then tighthead. At 17, Peter Walton, the ex-England 18s coach, saw that I might have potential at hooker. Bristol Academy put me in for the 18s league and I’ve played there the past three years.So you’ve come late to the throwing art? Yeah, Mark Luffman, a consultant for the RFU, would come on a weekly basis to do throwing coaching with me. He’s awesome. Whenever I need any advice on throwing or front-row specifics, I’ll go to Mark Irish at the club or drop Luffers a text.What are your strengths? Ball in hand is my speciality. There are a lot of running hookers coming through; Thacks (Harry Thacker) is a really good example of that. Similarly, I’ve always had a good pass for a front-rower. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALScenter_img And your work-ons?Set-piece was the big one when I was moving to senior rugby. The laws have been amended but the load that goes through the front row on the engage was completely new to me. So developing my strength and ability to manage that scrum battle.Who has most influenced your career? Peter Walton identified me at 14 as a player who had a lot of skills but was probably a bit too selfish on the ball. He challenged my perception of what a forward’s role should be. I guess that’s coming across in the way I like to play, using a variety of skills, not just a hard carry to get go-forward.What’s your best moment in rugby? My Premiership debut at Exeter is up there. For Pat (Lam) to back me and Stevie (Luatua) to trust me to go to the tail in the final play, and with the hysteria of beating a side like Exeter on their home ground, that match is something I’ll never forget.What are your goals this season? To push my way into more match-day 23s. But really it’s about taking my rugby game by game.RW VERDICT: Capon is out of the Schalk Brits school of hookers but showed his set-piece poise with that long throw at Exeter to set in motion Bristol’s late winning try. We tip the former England U18 captain to make the grade internationally. This article originally appeared in the January 2020 edition of Rugby World magazine.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.last_img read more

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James Lowe scores for Ireland in Autumn Nations Cup win over Wales

first_img— Ross Harries (@rossharries1) November 13, 2020 The unpalatable truth for Wales fans is that Ireland should have won by a bigger margin. Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. Have you seen a bigger grin before? James Lowe scores on his debut to tie up an emphatic victory for Ireland in the @autumnnations #C4Rugby #IREvWAL #AutumnNationsCup pic.twitter.com/skt86PK5uj— Channel 4 Sport (@C4Sport) November 13, 2020Ireland had dominated the first half and could have been further than 16-6 ahead – Quinn Roux with their try – but for some spirited scramble defence from the Welsh. This statistic illustrates their efforts: after 36 minutes, Wales had made 96 tackles to Ireland’s 21!The visitors showed more impetus after the break and began to secure turnovers at the breakdown, but couldn’t get significant points on the board. Then their ill-discipline (Wales conceded 18 penalties to Ireland’s 13), coupled with a malfunctioning set-piece, returned and Ireland were able to pull away.Here’s some post-match reaction from social media… LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS 18 – Wales lost 4/5 lineouts tonight, only once (4 v Italy, Feb 2019) had they lost as many in their previous 64 matches; they also conceded 18 penalties, only once in the last 10 years have they conceded as many (18 v Georgia 2017). Struggle. pic.twitter.com/FdM1o026Or— OptaJonny (@OptaJonny) November 13, 2020 Debut delight: James Lowe celebrates his try and Ireland’s win (Getty Images) That was some performance from 22-year-old Caelan Doris.He can become a really complete and dominant player for Ireland. Reckon he will be in the Lions mix. #IREvWAL— Murray Kinsella (@Murray_Kinsella) November 13, 2020 Andy Farrell’s side get their campaign off to a winning start in Dublin That was #Wales’ joint-fourth worst defeat to #Ireland ever. 23-point margin.54-10 2002 (44)36-6 2001 (30)31-5 2006 (26)32-9 TODAY (23)26-3 2014 (23)35-12 2003 (23)#AutumnNationsCup #rugby— Will Kelleher (@willgkelleher) November 13, 2020Ireland’s performance, which has piled more pressure on Wales coach Wayne Pivac, was all the more impressive when you consider that they lost both fly-halves to injury during the course of the match.Johnny Sexton left the field within half an hour with what looked like a hamstring injury. Ulster No 10 Billy Burns then took the field to win his first cap but he was forced off with an injury in the second period. So scrum-half Conor Murray came on in the playmaker role and kicked for goal, slotting two penalties and converting Lowe’s try.Late show: James Lowe scores Ireland’s second try against Wales (Getty Images)Ireland have got their Autumn Nations Cup campaign off to a winning start but are likely to face a sterner test against England at Twickenham next weekend, while Wales will be desperate to arrest the run of six straight defeats when they host Georgia at Parc y Scarlets. James Lowe scores for Ireland in Autumn Nations Cup win over WalesA James Lowe try in the final minute added the finishing touch to Ireland’s 32-9 victory over Wales in the first game of the Autumn Nations Cup at the Aviva Stadium in Dublin.The New Zealand-born Leinster wing was making his debut for Ireland having qualified on residency and had already impressed throughout the game, both with ball in hand and in defence.Then from the last play of the game, Player of the Match Caelan Doris broke from the back of a scrum deep in the Wales’ 22 and fed the ball to his Leinster team-mate, who made it to the line with power and pace.READ ABOUT JAMES LOWE IN THE CURRENT ISSUE OF RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINEYou can watch Lowe’s first Test try here…last_img read more

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Jack Willis scores on England debut

first_imgThe Wasps back-row gets a score against Georgia Jack Willis the first #England forward to score on debut since Billy Vunipola v Argentina in 2013. #AutumnNationsCup #statcave #rugbg— Will Kelleher (@willgkelleher) November 14, 2020The debut score is just another special moment in a great year for Willis. While, quite rightly, so much focus is placed on Jack Willis’ breakdown work, that is his 9th try in 14 games for club and country. Few better from close range. First start for @EnglandRugby Try on debutWhat a start to the #AutumnNationsCup for Jack Willis! Watch 𝐋𝐈𝐕𝐄 on #PrimeVideo pic.twitter.com/stc3qo614q— Amazon Prime Video Sport (@primevideosport) November 14, 2020Once England nosed ahead, they would not let up. However, it is worth reflecting on the special moment for the 23-year-old flanker. Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. Try time: Jack Willis celebrates scoring on debut (Getty Images) center_img — Bobby Bridge (@bobby_bridge) November 14, 2020 LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS TRY! Willis, who else. Great debut so far 5-0— Jonny Fordham (@SunJonnyFordham) November 14, 2020In the first half England would rack up 26 unanswered points against Georgia, going in at the break at 26-0 up after four tries.Not that Willis will be delighted with his afternoon – at the 46-minute mark head coach Eddie Jones opted to take the back-rower off and bring on Ben Earl.Also on the scoresheet in the first half was hooker Jamie George, who profitted from powerful English driving lineouts. And then full-back Elliot Daly got one from a sweeping move – although it came at a cost as Jonathan Joseph was hurt in the build-up and ended up hobbling off the field.England had their bonus point early in their first Autumn Nations Cup match.So as the rain hammered down in the second half at Twickenham, England rang the changes, happy to swap players out with the result looking secure. Jones also gave Max Malins his debut.The second half ticked along in terrible conditions without Georgia ever looking like they could worry their hosts. England played the sensible stuff, with the result assured. Jack Willis scores on England debutEngland approached their first outing of the Autumn Nations Cup in muscular fashion, determined to overpower their Georgian counterparts at Twickenham.And from the get-go, debutant openside Jack Willis was at the forefront of the physical effort. After quarter of an hour of arm-wrestling, the Wasps breakaway was rewarded with a first Test try.last_img read more

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My day off… Podcasting with Joe Marler

first_imgHarlequins and England loosehead Joe Marler has enjoyed talking himself in a new direction… “You know you are meant to make loads of careful analysis of decisions like this and scratch your chin and go into it. But actually, you definitely know straightaway. I just went ‘Yep!’”Marler offers his side of things at this point: “Um, it wasn’t overly quick.“With the publisher, when I first met them, they had this vision, ‘Look, we want you to write a book, and we’d love you to set up a podcast as well.’ And I was kinda like: I haven’t got a book. They said, ‘No no, we would like you to write one.’ Oh, okay.“Then they said ‘We’ll pay you this,’ and I said ‘Pardon?!’ “What if I write it and it’s a really s*** book? Do I have to pay this money back? They said, ‘No, you don’t have to pay it back’ and I went ‘Okay, fine yeah, I’ll happily write a book and do a podcast.’ Because it was something different.Special guest: Astronaut Tim Peake (Getty Images)“I guess I am at the point in my career now, where I’m 30. I’m not getting any younger. I’m clinging on for dear life on the pitch. And now it’s been dawning on me quite quickly that I need something else.“What next? If rugby stopped now, what else can I get my teeth into? Me and my wife have got a bit of a project we want to get stuck into and in order to do that we have to come up with some other streams to provide that.”Candidly, Marler says he is aware that so much has revolved around him, his needs, his schedule throughout his relationship with wife Daisy. In order for elite athletes to be, well, elite, sacrifices have to be made. Often that word ‘sacrifices’ actually means making many things about you. And so promoting a book and a podcast means the attention falls on the prop once again.But as the ticking clock of a career gets harder to ignore, Marler talks of the family dream: a coffee shop or café that sells infants’ clothes and toys. A nirvana for fatigue-fighting parents, you suspect.“We’ve had one of our episodes pulled by James Bond’s bosses”Compartmentalising is also something Marler believes he can be quite good at. It’s unlikely his two working worlds, of rugby and podcasting, can ever interfere with each other, because his three-hour commute to and from training offers him ample time to segue from thinking about one to the other.Channelling his inner Liam Neeson, he says of his rugby that he has “a particular set of skills – I can’t get much better to be honest, I’ve got a baseline”. Perhaps overly modest for someone who has played in a World Cup final and worn the red of the British & Irish Lions, but we take the point. He is saying that he has learnt where his strengths lie and how best to get the optimum out of himself. Nothing about his rugby is going to radically change now, so on his way back to home base he can muse over pod plans. “He’s a quick learner as well,” Fordyce adds of his co-host. “There will be points where I’ll say, ‘There’s a little thing that we can do here where you can do this or try doing this’. And he gives you a Joe look and nods his head. But then he’s doing it in the next episode without you having reminded him. I don’t want to blow smoke up his arse but I think he’s a bit of a podcast natural.” As it turns out, that sense of stumbling on a job that you then give your all presented itself in a novel way during lockdown. When home-schooling son Jasper, he found himself relishing preparing plans for the next day, getting a ruler out and designing tables on the page. Of course, the best-laid plans and all that, he found that the real challenge was corralling his son to the desk for prolonged periods.Their eyes meet…: Marler and Fordyce (Daniel Gould) Joe interjects with: “Podcast nause.”Every day is a school day, if you are willing to learn, and lessons can come from anywhere. Marler explains that Fordyce was too aggressive when he asked a stuntwoman straight up how much it would cost for them to set their arm alight – that’s too personal a question, say Marler. Fordyce concedes.Then there was the one episode that both men loved but that was lost to the world forever, as Fordyce explains: “We did an entire episode with someone, and it blew our minds, but because of the Official Secrets Act we’ve had to pull it. It’s been pulled.” Man on the mic: Marler recording a podcast (Daniel Gould) Sitting at a desk or in a van, staring into space, you can probably appreciate that. Because, hey, what the hell is a ‘penetration tester’?This article originally appeared in the December 2020 edition of Rugby World magazine.center_img The conversation doesn’t sit still either. Over the course of 40 minutes topics pop up, like the black market for buying dogs in Covid times, chicken sexing and being “accused by a knight of the realm of being the reason for losing a final,” in reference to Sir Clive Woodward being grumpy about Marler and Dan Cole not being stoney-faced in a pre-World Cup final press conference in Japan.Yet by his own admission, Marler used to find it hard opening up. Press events were seen as something of a duel. Fordyce has ghosted a number of athlete’s books – including cricketer Chris Gayle’s gloriously-named Six Machine – and feels that over time, when the big life questions arise, such people can open up. But in real life, isn’t it the most human thing to talk about the smaller things?Marler replies: “Yeah, definitely, but there’s also the other side of it where players then worry that if they do start talking about irrelevant or different things, they can be accused of not concentrating on the job.“Hang on, can’t there be an understanding that you can do both?”As a younger man, Marler says, he had his guard up with the media. The assumption being that whatever happened, the predisposition was to go for the negatives and the flashy headline. But after well-documented run-ins with the press and the rugby authorities, he soon decided that “if I’m always looking at this as ‘you’re all bad people,’ nothing will ever change, my outlook will never change”. And so he sought to talk with everyone he encounters on a ‘human level’ to see where they are coming from. Analysing his own early podcast performances, Marler has had back-and-forths with the team involved. Evidently, he tries to hone his craft. My day off… Podcasting with Joe MarlerTALKING EXCLUSIVELY rugby on a podcast would not float Joe Marler’s boat. Well, that’s putting it without colour. Ask the man himself if he’d considered starting a rugby pod and he says: “You know there are certain things you have to do, like taking the bins out. But if you do a podcast, I wanted to do a podcast that sort of made my d*** hard.”And like that, we are off and rolling. Yes, we can talk to the England and Harlequins loosehead prop about joining up with the national squad for the Autumn Nations Cup. Or the Premiership season. Or how his view of his own game has evolved over time. And some of those things do come up while chatting. He is very appreciative of what rugby has brought him in life.But it is clear the forward is throwing himself headlong at a podcast, The Joe Marler Show alongside Tom Fordyce, which is decidedly un-rugby.The premise? The pair interview folk from totally different walks of life and see what they can find out. Astronauts, zookeepers and psychopath experts have come in for questioning. Curiosity can take you to places you never thought possible, even if in that place you chat about animal poo or aliens.It’s not quite like the future co-hosts’ eyes met across a crowded room in Japan, but the seeds of this relationship were sown at the Rugby World Cup, when Marler was representing England on the field and Fordyce was working from the wings with BBC Radio 5 Live.Club colours: Marler in action with Harlequins (Getty Images)“I was 5 Live’s man in the England camp, which basically meant I’d have a succession of pleasant five-minute chats with three different players each day,” Fordyce says. “So, then Joe and I had a half-hour chat that covers all these topics, including the cast of Neighbours, or before he went to Japan whether he thought ramen was what the posher end of Quins’ support was called” – the old gag earns a theatrical eye-roll off Marler.“It was the best chat I had in Japan. Then Joe obviously wrote his book. The publisher was the same as the Peter Crouch book, which I also wrote (with Crouch), and we had done a podcast off the back of that. They asked me if I’d consider doing a pod with Joe. Hold on… Here Marler comes back in: “I can see your face, ‘Alright, these lads have come up with a plan… just made up bull****’. No, we did this. It was one of my favourites. And then, about two days after, Steve (Jones, from Crowd Network) said: ‘Bad news guys, you can’t hear that episode. It has been pulled by the Secret Service.’“That was a gutting one but at the same time it was quite cool because, well, we’ve had one of our episodes pulled by James Bond’s bosses.”Mutual repsect: With England boss Eddie Jones (Getty Images)At this stage, no one wants to overthink how things can evolve too far into the future (though the pair do joke about a roadshow with Marler’s Volkswagen Caravelle). Once they throw around ideas about the best people to talk to and formulate a plan, Fordyce explains, they just rattle in to chat with each other, see where it goes.For Marler, it is an exciting avenue to explore while he is still at the very sharp end of rugby. What a great excuse it is to meet interesting new people and learn things along the way, asking whatever comes to mind. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.last_img read more

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Tutu y Jefferts Schori dialogan sobre la misión de la…

first_img Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Featured Events In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Tags Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Curate Diocese of Nebraska This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Tutu y Jefferts Schori dialogan sobre la misión de la Iglesia Una conversación en la Catedral Nacional de Washington Rector Bath, NC Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Hopkinsville, KY Submit a Job Listing Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Tampa, FL Rector Belleville, IL Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Martinsville, VA Por Lynette WilsonPosted May 22, 2012 Submit a Press Release Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Washington, DC An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Cathedral Dean Boise, ID An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Pittsburgh, PA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Knoxville, TN Submit an Event Listing Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Smithfield, NC Press Release Service Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Featured Jobs & Calls Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Collierville, TN Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Albany, NY Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC De izquierda a derecha, la obispa primada Katharine Jefferts Schori, el arzobispo emérito de Ciudad del Cabo Desmond Tutu y David Crabtree, presentador de un noticiero en la WRAL-TV en Raleigh, Carolina del Norte, y diácono en la Diócesis de Carolina del Norte. Foto de Lynette Wilson[Episcopal News Service – Washington, D.C.] Desmond Tutu, arzobispo emérito de Ciudad del Cabo, compartió una historia personal de su infancia durante una conversación sobre la misión que tuvo lugar el 19 de mayo en la Catedral Nacional de Washington, una historia que le ha acompañado por más de 70 años.Los 30 minutos de conversación en directo entre Tuto y la obispa primada de la Iglesia Episcopal, Katharine Jefferts Schori, fueron moderados por David Crabtree, presentador de un programa de noticias de la WRAL-TV en Raleigh, Carolina del Norte, de cuya diócesis [episcopal] también es diácono. Se puede obtener a solicitud aquí.Tutu contó una historia acerca de su madre, una empleada doméstica de escasa educación, que cocinaba y limpiaba para mujeres negras ciegas durante una época en Sudáfrica “cuando los negros eran ‘inferiores’ o así los llamaban’, dijo él, añadiendo que en ese día en particular, teniendo 8 o 9 años, se encontraba de pie junto a su madre en el lugar donde ella trabajaba.“Vi algo que nunca pensé ver”, dijo Tutu con voz muy suave. “Un sacerdote blanco con una sotana larga y suelta que llevaba un enorme sombrero, y cuando pasó junto a mi madre se quito el sombrero. Un sacerdote blanco, una mujer negra en la Sudáfrica del apartheid… Para él era la manera normal de saludar a cualquier mujer. Así era como él demostraba que creía que cada uno de nosotros era portador de Dios… Yo no tuve conciencia de que eso era algo que habría de conservar en mi memoria. Y ya tengo 80 años”.El sacerdote era Trevor Huddleston, un conocido activista en contra del apartheid que más tarde llegó a ser arzobispo de la Provincia Anglicana del Océano Índico.“Yo aún recuerdo el impacto del gesto de quitarse el sombrero de Trevor Huddleston que fue un reconocimiento de lo que decimos en nuestra teología, ‘eres creado a imagen de Dios y eres un portador de Dios’ y eso es lo que procuramos decir en nuestra proclamación…”Crabtree le preguntó a Tutu y a Jefferts Schori que definieran la misión, en lo que a la Iglesia respecta, y “cuál es la mejor manera de llevarla a cabo”.“La misión consiste realmente en hacernos conscientes a todos del increíble amor de Dios por todos nosotros”, dijo Tutu. “Dice cosas como ésta, sabes qué no tienes que ganarte el amor de Dios. Dios te ama, punto, y todo fluye a partir de ahí”.Jefferts Schori dijo, mientras Tutu asentía, que la misión consiste en recibir amor y, luego, responder [a esa dádiva] saliendo al mundo a propagar ese amor.“Se trata de llamar a los que están cerca y los que están lejos a reunirse en el redil; se trata de sanar y reconciliar, se trata de hacer que el amor encarne en las vidas de las personas que nos rodean y en las vidas de las personas que están en el otro extremo del mundo”.La conversación se centró en las Cinco Marcas Anglicanas de la Misión. Crabtree preguntó, en referencia a la primera marca, “Proclamar las Buenas Nuevas del Reino”, ¿cómo llevar esa proclamación a un mundo tan necesitado del mensaje, pero atascado en la duda?La pregunta le recordó a Jefferts Schori de un encuentro que tuvo hace algunos años en un asilo de ancianos donde una mujer llevaba puesta una sudadera que decía por el frente “‘Jesús te ama’ y por la espalda decía ‘pero yo soy su favorita’. Todos nosotros tenemos una sudadera como ésa. Todos somos favoritos de Dios. Pero necesitamos de los demás para recordarlo”.La duda, prosiguió ella, “es una oportunidad que alguien tiene de salir y responder; es una oportunidad de crecer en la confianza de que eres profunda, abundante y eternamente amado, pero eso no nos sucede sin ese encuentro corporal”.Lo que buscamos decir en la proclamación, respondió Tutu, no es que el mundo en que vivimos sea un paraíso, sino que tenemos a un Dios omnipotente “que espera que nosotros seamos sus colaboradores”.“Y ése es nuestro privilegio y nuestra responsabilidad: ayudar a convertir este páramo en el jardín que Dios siempre se propuso que fuera este mundo”, dijo Tutu, que fue arzobispo de Ciudad del Cabo y primado de la Iglesia Anglicana de África del Sur de 1986 a 1996.El Consejo Consultivo Anglicano, el organismo principal en la formulación de las políticas de la Comunión Anglicana, elaboró entre 1984 y 1990 las Cinco Marcas de la Misión para ofrecerles a las parroquias y diócesis en todo el mundo un prontuario práctico y memorable de las actividades de la misión.Las cinco marcas de la misión son:1.  Proclamar las Buenas Nuevas del Reino de Dios2.  Enseñar, bautizar y formar a nuevos creyentes.3.  Responder a las necesidades humanas con amoroso servicio.4.  Procurar la transformación de las estructuras sociales injustas.5.  Luchar por salvaguardar la integridad de la creación y por el sostenimiento y la renovación de la vida en la tierra.En referencia al relato de Tutu sobre el respeto que Huddleston le mostró a su madre, la segunda marca y la segunda promesa del Pacto Bautismal (http://www.episcopalchurch.org/page/baptismal-covenant) de respetar la dignidad de todo ser humano, Crabtree preguntó: “¿Cuál es la mejor manera de quitarnos el sombrero ante los demás?”Jefferts Schori, que en su primera infancia fue educada en una iglesia católica romana donde le enseñaron a hacer una venia siempre que se encontraba con una monja en el pasillo, dijo que ella aprendió mucho de la tradición monástica, donde en reconocimiento a Dios uno se inclina ante sus hermanos y hermanas en la comunidad.“Si pasamos por la vida de ese modo”, dando gracias y reconociendo la imagen de Dios “dondequiera que vamos, el mundo funcionaría de manera diferente, muy diferente”, afirmó. “Vivimos en una sociedad que con mucha frecuencia supone [que se encuentra con] un enemigo, en lugar de con la imagen de Dios”.En respuesta a la pregunta de Crabtree sobre la mejor manera de responder a las necesidades de los demás, Jefferts Schori habló acerca de la necesidad de la autocompasión.“Cuando tenemos un sentido de nuestra propia desolación y tenemos compasión por nosotros mismos, entonces podemos tener compasión por los demás. Es esencial poder ver ese ser humano herido que está necesitado de compañía”, dijo.“Ésa es la única vía en que podemos ser corestauradores, cocreadores con Dios al responder a ese [ser] herido. Yo creo que ésa es la salvación del mundo. Pero exige encontrar la vulnerabilidad en tu propia alma”.Prosiguiendo con la cuarta marca de la misión, “procurar la transformación de las estructuras sociales injustas”, Crabtree observó que encontrar esa “vulnerabilidad” puede ser “como nadar contracorriente” intentando corregir las estructuras injustas de la sociedad. “Sin embargo, uno tiene que mantenerse empujando poquito a poco y confiando en que Dios ve el esfuerzo, porque sabemos que Dios sí ve eso…”Hablando a partir de su experiencia como un líder anti apartheid en Sudáfrica y testificando de la opresión y la injusticia a que muchos se enfrentaron, Tutu dijo que hubo una época cuando muchas personas en el mundo, e incluso algunos líderes del movimiento, podían haber dicho, “este horrible sistema, no hay modo que podamos derribarlo”.“Bien”, y se rió. “¿Recuerdan lo que pasó? La gente de Sudáfrica hizo su parte, pero fue en gran medida el [resultado del] apoyo que obtuvimos de la comunidad internacional, del movimiento antiapartheid, ustedes saben esas alianzas que teníamos, los jóvenes que se manifestaban y laboraban por la desinversión, y aquí estamos hoy.“En los años 80, e incluso en los 90, muchos decían que no, que la única manera en que se iban a resolver las cosas en Sudáfrica era a través de un espantoso baño de sangre racial, pero eso no sucedió. Y se debió a una alianza de personas alrededor del mundo”.Tutu recibió el Premio Nobel de la Paz en 1984 por sus empeños en ponerle fin al apartheid. Luego de la caída del apartheid en 1994, él encabezó la Comisión de Verdad y Reconciliación de Sudáfrica.Crabtree, que también recordaba haber visto a Tuto en el programa “Nightline” con Ted Koppel en los años 80, le preguntó cuándo él se había dado cuenta de que tenía que aliarse con Dios para combatir al apartheid. “Usted no se apareció allí de improviso, sino que había estado en esta lucha durante mucho tiempo”, dijo Crabtree.Tutu volvió a reírse y le dijo: “No sé. Supongo, que has de tener cuidado en lo que le pides a Dios que haga contigo, cuando le dices “estoy aquí, úsame’, y Dios te toma en serio”.Él dijo que él éxito del movimiento antiapartheid se debía a la inundación de oraciones de todas partes del mundo, añadiendo que él no era más que una persona comprometida en una comunidad mucho más grande. “Tú sabías que eras parte de algo que finalmente no iba a ser derrotado”, agregó.Respecto al poder de la oración, en una pregunta hecha por ENS luego de la transmisión, Tutu dijo: “Una de las cosas prodigiosas es que Dios no suele hacernos saber, en este lado de la muerte, dónde nuestras oraciones realmente funcionan, porque, gústenos o no, nos volveríamos ligeramente presuntuosos. Pero el hecho de que la oración funciona no está en duda”.También después de la transmisión, Jefferts Schori dijo que ella sí se siente “apoyada por las oraciones y la fuerza que me llega de lugares que no sé dónde están. Y ello produce una sensación de paz que proviene, creo yo, de las oraciones de muchas, muchas, muchas personas.“Yo no puedo hacer el trabajo que hago sin eso. No podría hacerlo sin eso. Y darme cuenta de eso es una experiencia inmensamente gratificante”.Al principio del programa, antes de entrar a conversar sobre la misión, Tuto tomó un momento para encomiar a la Iglesia Episcopal por “su generosidad y su mansedumbre de espíritu” cuando podría haber sido “cáustica” en su respuesta a los recientes desafíos [que ha encontrado] en la Comunión Anglicana.Crabtree concluyó la plática sobre la misión abordando la quinta marca: “Luchar por salvaguardar la integridad de la creación y por el sostenimiento y la renovación de la vida en la tierra”.“Dios nos puso en este jardín para que cuidáramos de el, porque es la fuente de la vida física de todo lo que existe” dijo Jefferts Schori.“Desafortunadamente en nuestra historia, los cristianos con frecuencia han malentendido el dominio tomándolo por propiedad privada. Se trata de mantenimiento del hogar, de administración y de mayordomía de los integrantes de la creación.“Se recuperará en la medida en que adquiramos una mayor conciencia de que todos estamos íntimamente conectados…que somos una comunidad dinámica…y que no podemos prescindir de ninguna de sus partes: la totalidad de su ser es esencial a nuestra vida y a la vida de todos y cada uno de los seres humanos y de todas y cada una de las criaturas que pueblan este planeta”, ella dijo.— Lynette Wilson es redactora y reportera de Episcopal News Service. Traducción de Vicente Echerri.En inglés: http://bit.ly/LzdY7B Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Shreveport, LA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Anglican Communion, Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA last_img read more

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