Villa I Tatti accepting applications for Graduate Fellowships

first_imgTwo Graduate Fellowships are available for Harvard Ph.D. students each fall and spring semester at Villa I Tatti. The primary goal is to allow students working on their dissertation or selecting their topics to read widely in Renaissance sources and secondary literature, and to see objects related to their studies.I Tatti offers its Fellows the precious time they need to pursue their research with a minimum of obligations and interruptions together with a maximum of scholarly resources—a combination that distinguishes the Harvard Center from similar institutions. In order to foster a collaborative spirit, Fellows are expected to live in the Florence area and to spend at least three days a week at the center. Lunch and tea are served each weekday, and the I Tatti community takes shape over these convivial occasions. Each year, a limited number of activities organized at I Tatti are reserved for the Fellows, and they join the wider community at conferences, lectures, and concerts. Read Full Storylast_img read more

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A virus that targets the elderly

first_imgGAZETTE: How many folks have been asked not to come in?CHEN: [The number is] very small — three or four — because we told our Family Advisory Council we were moving forward with this and sent written and email communication to our families and to frequent visitors. So most people were not surprised when they came to visit.We are also no longer allowing volunteer programming, which is a sad thing. We have a huge number of volunteers, but I think it is a prudent measure. We also have a wonderful, multigenerational program on one of our campuses, which is co-located with a K-8 school. The kids would come over to do activities and visit. That has been temporarily suspended. We also hosted quite a number of events — parties and celebrations and things of that nature — which have all been suspended until further notice.GAZETTE: How hard is it to make these decisions, given the importance of social connectivity and visits from family to the lives and emotional health of your older residents?CHEN: It’s incredibly hard. At the end of the day, for the people who live with us, this is their home. And in our homes, we have visitors, guests, people coming in and out. Likewise, when someone is living here, we’d like them to have visitors and social support. But we’re trying to balance the psychological and emotional well-being of our residents against their heightened risk for complications and mortality from this virus. We continue to learn more, but the highest-risk group — if you’re talking about mortality — is people over the age of 80 who have comorbid conditions. That describes a lot of people who live here.GAZETTE: How closely have you followed the Life Care Center situation near Seattle? Are there lessons that you can draw from that? Or is what you’re doing drawn from standard public health practice?CHEN: I only know what’s been published. What we have seen from that is it’s about avoiding exposure to an infected person as much as possible, and then being as aggressive as possible if exposure occurred.I hope that when this all improves, everyone who’s been involved would openly share what we should be doing as a nation in terms of our public health infrastructure — in particular for our older patients and those in long-term care. “Because there’s no vaccine, because there’s no targeted treatment for this virus yet, we would implore the public to really think about protecting our most vulnerable population, namely the very old and those with chronic medical conditions.” This is part of our Coronavirus Update series in which Harvard specialists in epidemiology, infectious disease, economics, politics, and other disciplines offer insights into what the latest developments in the COVID-19 outbreak may bring.As the number of cases and deaths alike mount from COVID-19, the respiratory illness associated with the new coronavirus, the toll of fatalities at a skilled nursing center in Washington state reached 19, highlighting the deep danger the virus presents to the elderly.Harvard-affiliated Hebrew SeniorLife offers a continuum of care for 3,000 elderly people daily, with a range of services including residential assisted living, short-term rehabilitation, outpatient services, and long-term care for those with chronic illness. In a Q&A interview aimed at understanding the challenges involved, Harvard Medical School Assistant Professor Helen Chen, Hebrew SeniorLife’s chief medical officer, discussed steps the facility has taken to combat the virus and the outlook going forward.Q&AHelen ChenGAZETTE:  How concerned are you for your elderly residents and patients in the face of this epidemic?CHEN:  We’re very worried, and I know they’re anxious because I’ve been getting a lot of emails from them. For the inpatients, many are here because they’re not cognitively able and, for them, we’re just trying not to make them anxious. But it is really the families of those patients and residents who have expressed the most concern.GAZETTE: Are you taking any special steps in the face of this?CHEN: We’ve enhanced staff training and are looking at revising protocols regarding personal protective equipment. But the main intervention is limiting visitation, and no visiting if you are ill. We recognize that many people who live here are reliant on their family members for emotional and social support, but we’re encouraging people to limit visits with an eye toward protecting the vulnerable people who live with us. Today I heard from security that we’ve had a significant decline in the number of visits, which is, I think, a good thing.For those who do come, we have moved to screening all visitors who enter any of our health care campuses and most of our housing sites. The health care campuses are a particular focus because people who live in a long-term chronic hospital or in the rehab unit are at high risk. They are older and have comorbid conditions, so every visitor receives a health and travel assessment before they’re allowed on campus.GAZETTE: Does that screening happen when you walk in the door?CHEN: Yes. There’s a symptom review, there’s a travel review, and there’s an exposure review. And if the answer to any of those questions is yes, then you’re asked to not come in. And so far people have been compliant and have left. So that is a good thing. “We’ve enhanced staff training and are looking at revising protocols regarding personal protective equipment. But the main intervention is limiting visitation, and no visiting if you are ill.” GAZETTE: What should family members know ahead of time about visiting an elderly family member, either in your facility or another? Should they put all visits off? Monitor their own health and then make a decision?CHEN: It’s a very individualized decision regarding whether or not to visit with someone. Everybody should use common sense and judgment about symptoms. If you have a cough and a fever, if you’ve got respiratory symptoms and you’re short of breath, if you’ve traveled to a place of concern or if you may have been exposed to someone who did — especially if you’re symptomatic — then I would definitely ask, “Do I really need to visit my grandma today? Can I wait and can I Skype her? Can I do FaceTime?”I know that’s hard for some of our older adults who aren’t technologically savvy, but maybe now is the time to get them hooked up. It really would be heartbreaking if, in wanting to do something positive for someone’s emotional or mental health, you ended up infecting them.GAZETTE: Any advice to people considering elective surgery like hip replacement that might land them in a rehabilitation facility? Should they consider delaying it?CHEN: I haven’t seen any specific recommendations — and I’m not advising anyone — but my personal take, separate from the rehab issue, is to ask, do you want to be in the hospital during this time if something’s really completely elective and can absolutely be delayed? Why not wait until we either know more or we have more experience or we have more clarity about the true prevalence? If it could wait, I might consider having a conversation with my primary care doctor or surgeon.GAZETTE: Anything else the public should know concerning this new virus and our elderly, whether at Hebrew SeniorLife or elsewhere?CHEN: I’m saying this to everybody — everybody — and I can’t emphasize this enough: really, wash your hands, wash your hands, wash your hands. I know people are tired of hearing it, but it is really true. During the SARS epidemic, washing your hands, using good cough etiquette, using social distancing and not touching your face, they estimate dropped SARS spread by 30 to 50 percent.And, because there’s no vaccine, because there’s no targeted treatment for this virus yet, we would implore the public to really think about protecting our most vulnerable population, namely the very old and those with chronic medical conditions. Think carefully about whether — even if you think you just have a cold — you want to expose this very vulnerable population to your viral pathogens. Our elders are vulnerable and we’re all very concerned about their health.center_img The Daily Gazette Sign up for daily emails to get the latest Harvard news.last_img read more

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Buy on the waterfront for under $1 million

first_img3 Allambi Ave, Broadbeach Waters. More from news02:37Purchasers snap up every residence in the $40 million Siarn Palm Beach Northless than 1 hour ago02:37International architect Desmond Brooks selling luxury beach villa20 hours ago20 Doeblien Drive, South Stradbroke. 5 Firmin Court, Mermaid Waters — offers over $859,000 With a water vista from every room, this property offers a rare waterfront and parkfront position.Located in a cul-de-sac, the 678sq m property if fully fenced with enough room to install a pool.The house has a recently refurbished kitchen, along with three bedrooms and two bathrooms 35 Lachlan Drive, Coomera Waters. 5 Firmin Court, Mermaid Waters. 22-24 Admiralty Drive, Paradise Waters is a boatie’s dream.“It’s about the lifestyle they provide,” Tim Zampech of Harcourts Coastal — Paradise Point said.“The Coast is all about the sun, sand, surf, fishing and boating and living on the waterfront gives people quick access to that.”“You can be on your boat within minutes and out on the water enjoying life.” 20 Doeblien Drive, South Stradbroke. 5 Firmin Court, Mermaid Waters.He said there was huge demand for waterfront properties on the Coast.“We get a lot of demand from the southern markets,” he said.“People ask themselves ‘why am I living in an older $3 million house in Sydney when I can get a brand new waterfront house for $1 million to $1.5 million on the Gold Coast’.”While most waterfront houses are on the market for seven digit figures, here are five priced under $1 million: 20 Doeblien Drive, South Stradbroke — $869,000 Live the island life in a new three-bedroom island home on South Stradbroke Island.The house features open plan living and dining areas, a kitchen within pantry and a master bedroom that overlooks the water.“You definitely don’t need to be a millionaire to live an amazing, fun-filled life on the water in one of the most beautiful locations on the Gold Coast,” the listing states. 5 Firmin Court, Mermaid Waters. 35 Lachlan Drive, Coomera Waters — $900,000 – $950,000 Enjoy views of Sanctuary Cove in your elevated house in Coomera Shores.The 10-year-old home offers four bedrooms, two bathrooms and a standout kitchen with stone benchtops and European appliances,The property is described as a “slice of heaven at an entry level price”. 35 Lachlan Drive, Coomera Waters. 490 Oxley Drive, Runaway Bay — offers over $960,000 If a large family home is what you’re after, look no further that this Runaway Bay gem.“With its functional floor plan, wide waterfrontage and your very own pontoon, this home provides the buyer a chance to live that iconic Gold Coast lifestyle,” the listing states.A private entertaining area offers a stunning vista of the pool and canal while the pontoon is easily accessible. 5 Firmin Court, Mermaid Waters. 490 Oxley Drive, Runaway Bay. 490 Oxley Drive, Runaway Bay. 490 Oxley Drive, Runaway Bay. 3 Allambi Ave, Broadbeach Waters — $849,000 While not directly on the waterfront, a large leg of land leads down from the property to the water, just off the main river.The house, in Florida Gardens, features three bedrooms and two bathrooms on a 616sq m L-shaped parcel of land. 20 Doeblien Drive, South Stradbroke.LIVING on the waterfront is often referred to as the quintessential Gold Coast lifestyle and you don’t have to be a millionaire to do so.A boatie’s paradise and entertainer’s dream, waterfront properties offer a point of difference. 3 Allambi Ave, Broadbeach Waters.last_img read more

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Peterson races to Dirt Dominator win at River Cities

first_imgTyler Peterson won Friday Dirt Dominator at River Cities Speedway. (Photo by Mike Spieker, www.speedway-shots.com)By Mike SpiekerGRAND FORKS, N.D. (July 6) – The Dirt Dominator series continued Friday at River Cities Speedway in Grand Forks. Tyler Peterson picked up a thrilling win in the finals to punch his ticket to the $10,000-to-win Dirt Dominator finale at Heart O’ Texas Speedway in Waco on Oct. 25. It was no easy drive to the finals for Peterson. The Hickson, N.D., driver was paired with Casey Arneson, who won the IMCA Modified feature earlier in the evening. After getting by Arneson, Peterson was paired with Marcus Tomlinson before facing weekly local foe Rob VanMil. Peterson snuck by VanMil to meet hometown hero Dustin Strand. Strand won the coin flip for lane choice and elected to start on the low groove.The duo picked up the pace out of turn two and were door to door exiting turn four to take the green flag. They made contact on the front stretch heading into turn one with Peterson holding a half car length advantage. Peterson opened up his lead to five car lengths as he took the white flag as the cruised to the $1,000 payday.“Starting off of turn two, I knew I needed to get a good jump. I really liked the bottom but Dustin won the coin toss and took it. We got into it on the front stretch, but it was hard racing for a thousand bucks. That was a lot of fun out there,” said Peterson in victory lane. “I love this place and have a lot of laps around here. We just set up the car the best we could and gave it everything we had.” Sweet 16:Tyler Peterson defeated Casey Arneson; Marcus Tomlinson defeated Dan Dowling; Rob VanMil defeated Rusty Kollman; Zach Dockter defeated Joey Rowell; Lucas Rodin defeated Nick Curtis; Rich Pavlicek defeated Jesse Skalicky; Dustin Strand defeated Bryce Borgen; and Darren Pfau defeated Dustin Hartwig. Elite 8:Peterson defeated Tomlinson; VanMil defeated Dockter; Pavlicek defeated Rodin; and Strand defeated Pfau. Final 4:Peterson defeated VanMil; and Strand defeated Pavlicek. Final:Peterson defeated Strand.last_img read more

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