Broward County Lifts Curfew Following George Floyd Protests

first_imgBroward officials announced Wednesday afternoon that they are lifting the countywide curfew, although they warn it could be reinstated if there are any threats of civil unrest.The county has been under a curfew order from 9 p.m. to 6 a.m. since last Sunday, when afternoon protests in Fort Lauderdale became chaotic amid tension between law enforcement and demonstrators.County Administrator Bertha Henry terminated the curfew order on Wednesday afternoon. The curfew could be reimposed, officials add, with as little as one-hour notice “if there is evidence of possible civil unrest that threatens the health, safety, or welfare of the public.” Cities may still have their own curfews in place. For that reason, the county asks residents to check with their municipality.Protests in Broward County since Sunday night have remained mostly peaceful, as residents take place in nationwide demonstrations against racial inequality, following the death of George Floyd while in police custody in Minneapolis.last_img read more

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Freeholders Back Sheriff’s Fight To Work With ICE

first_imgIn March, the sheriff renewed the 287(g) for 10 years ahead of its June 30 expiration date, a move which upset Grewal because he was supposed to sign off on all such agreements. Grewal has maintained that these agreements do not make communities safer and said law enforcement can notify ICE in cases when an illegal immigrant has been arrested for murder, rape or other offenses specified in his directive. “We’re going to explore all legal options to the policy,” Golden said. “It’s counterintuitive to not have law enforcement work with each other. In a post-9/11 era, we continue to share data and intelligence with other law enforcement agencies. And that should be the case.” “All undocumented immigrants,” she said, “need to be documented in some way, period.” Monmouth finds itself in the national debate on immigration, as critics of the Trump administration and its so-called “deportation agenda” have set their sights on ending 287(g) agreements. The Immigrant Legal Resource Center, a nonprofit advocacy group headquartered in San Francisco, California, has provided a tool kit for organizers laying out everything from media strategy to tips on how to drum up opposition. The timing of the fight between Monmouth and the state comes with less than a month before the general election, where Republicans Golden, Arnone and freeholder candidate and Wall Township committeeman Dominick DiRocco are on the ballot. DiRocco said freeholders had taken the “first step in protecting county residents from the state’s misguided policy.” “Permitting our county sheriffs to make the call regarding their working with the federal government is the right way to go here,” he said. “Our sheriff and freeholders are smart, deliberative people. Their focus is on providing every tool to our law enforcement personnel to keep us safe.” The county was not paid by the federal government for being in the arrangement with ICE. Golden and freeholders feel that participating in the program “has made the streets of Monmouth County safer for our residents and has permitted Immigration and Customs Enforcement to detain and prosecute individuals who are charged with serious crimes and pose a significant threat to our community,” according to a resolution freeholders adopted Oct. 10 to authorize looking for outside counsel. One state lawmaker fromMonmouth County lookedto Washington D.C. to solvethe problem. The scope of such voluntary agreements varies around the country. In Monmouth, where a 287(g) had been in place for about a decade, the arrangement was a jail model. Staff at the county jail would check on whether an inmate was in the country illegally and, if so, alert ICE. But Rhoda Chodosh, a Manalapan resident active in Republican politics, shared the steps she had to follow to become a U.S. citizen legally. Lee Moore, a spokesmanfor Grewal’s office, had nocomment. Officials are looking to move quickly on getting legal help. County counsel Michael D. Fitzgerald, speaking at the freeholder meeting, told the board he would present them with some choices at their next meeting Oct. 24. Golden said he understood the purpose of Grewal’s directive but he thought it also contained loopholes “that allow for repetitive offenders and escalating offenders that would normally be caught in a 287(g) system to now be set free in our community.” Grewal has been a critic of the Trump administration when it comes to immigration and other issues. In November he issued his first version of the “immigrant trust directive” in which he sharply curtailed law enforcement agencies’ role in cooperating with ICE. His revised version of that directive was released last month. Moira Nelson and Michael Penna, the two Democrats running for freeholder, said they support Grewal’s directive. “It’s only for people that are in jail and created a crime,” said Thomas A. Arnone, freeholder director, during the freeholder meeting Oct. 10. “It’s not the average person that just gets stopped for a traffic ticket.” center_img Monmouth County freeholders plan to challenge New Jersey Attorney General Gurbir S. Grewal in federal court over his decision forbidding county Sheriff Shaun Golden’s office from cooperating with federal immigration officials. But state Sen. DeclanO’Scanlon Jr. (R-13) said hefelt Grewal was “wrong” inthis case. “Put simply, New Jersey’s law enforcement officers protect the public by investigating state criminal offenses and enforcing state criminal laws,” Grewal wrote in the directive. “They are not responsible for enforcing civil immigration violations except in narrowly defined circumstances. Such responsibilities instead fall to the federal government and those operating under its authority.” The first step in that process came last week when they started looking for outside legal counsel, either an attorney or law firm, to represent Monmouth in a suit against Grewal and the state. The decision was prompted by Grewal’s actions last month. Monmouth County would not be the first to challenge Grewal in court. Ocean County has sued, while Cape May County is also looking to take on the attorney general. Like Monmouth, those two counties are Republican-controlled. Itzel Perez, an activist from Red Bank, urged the board to “reconsider going into a lawsuit” over the attorney general’s directive. Betsy Wattley, of Shrewsbury, said she was “devastated” the board was considering suing. On Sept. 27, he issued a revised directive forbidding all law enforcement agencies in New Jersey from renewing or entering into 287(g) arrangements with U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement. As in the past on this issue, critics of the 287(g) program turned out to the freeholder meeting to voice opposition. “The 287(g) rules allow the federal government to almost deputize local law enforcement to be immigration agents, with no set rules how policy will be applied,” Assemblyman Eric Houghtaling (D-11) said. “I wish the federal government, who is in charge of immigration and deportation, would do their job, create better guidelines for their agents and stop driving a wedge between local law enforcement and the communities they serve.” The sheriff’s offices in Cape May and Monmouth counties were the only law enforcement agencies in the state to have 287(g) agreements, both of which were terminated by Grewal’s directive of Sept. 27. Freeholders and Golden, however, believe that the attorney general’s action conflicts with the supremacy clause of the U.S. Constitution, namely that federal law is the supreme law of the land, according to the resolution freeholders adopted last week. “It’s unsafe,” Golden said. “Our opponents continue to politicize the issue to fuel an already divisive cultural conversation,” they said in a statement. “No one is suggesting that suspected criminals should be set free or that information pertaining to their crime shouldn’t be shared with other appropriate departments. We’re highly disappointed to see that the Freeholders are moving forward with hiring an attorney to challenge the AG’s directive. It sends the wrong message and is a flat-out waste of Monmouth taxpayers’ dollars.” By Philip Sean Curran In 2018, 40 inmates atthe jail out of about 7,800were identified as ICE holdsand detainees, Golden said.last_img read more

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Peewee Leafs bounce back to nip Spokane B’s

first_imgBy The Nelson Daily StaffThe Spokane A’s pay a visit to the Heritage City Saturday to meet the Peewee Leafs in West Kootenay Peewee Rep Minor Hockey action.The A’s blasted the Leafs 8-0 in action last week in Spokane.Sunday, Nelson rebounded from the tough loss to edge the Spokane B’s 1-0.Merrisa Dawson scored the only goal the Leafs would need on a pass from Everett Hicks.Joey Timmermans and Curt Doyle split the netminding duties for the Leafs.Nelson enters the contest with a 5-4-1 record while Spokane heads the division with one loss in eight [email protected]last_img

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Mallard’s Team of the Week — Kootenay Kannibelles

first_imgThe Terminal City Roller Girls scored early and often en route to a convincing 159-75 victory over the Kootenay Kannibelles in the final of the Klash In The Kootenays Western Canadian Women’s Flat Track Roller Derby Championships Sunday at the NDCC Arena in Nelson.But it was the Kannibelles who captured the hearts of everyone at the Klash In The Kootenays as the local allstar squad, which qualified for the National in January of 2013, pushed the high-powered Terminal City squad in every jam. Staff and management at Mallard’s Source for Sports is quick to applaud the Kannibelles with Team of the Week.The squad includes, back row, L-R, Terror Australis, Brutiful Bits, Courtney Shove, Celine Die-On, Scarlett Bloodbath, Black Eyed Tea and Anne Surly (with the tiara).Middle,Tara Pieceoff, Misstreat, Phil Your Pants Pants Off and Jezebrawler.Front, Canuck Norris, Pell-Mell, Tex A Masacure, Beretta Lynch  and Mariah Scarey TeAmo.last_img read more

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Brewers steamroll to Sunfest Tournament Title

first_imgNelson opened with a 10-4 win over Castlegar Steelers followed by a narrow 10-9 win over Castlegar Royals.The Brewers then outlasted the Castlegar Raptors 12-7 to conclude the round robin draw with a 3-0 record.In the semi finals, Nelson edged the Raptors again, this time by a 6-4 score.The team includes, Moss Beattie, Gavin Franklin, Levi Konken,Sebastien Conne Correnti, Cash Nay, Gunnar Evenson, Larson Proctor, Cohen Wolbaum, Connor Peters, Austin Shrieves and Dax Dewar. Coaches are Kevin Dewar and assistant Jordan Konken.The Brewers, undefeated on the season at 12-0, play the Trail BlueJays Wednesday in Beaver Valley. Dewars Brewers had the offence running on all cylinders, putting up 10 runs during a 10-8 victory over Trail Mariners in Castlegar Sunfest Minor Division Baseball Tournament Sunday in the Sunflower City.The win was the fifth of the tournament for the Brewers.last_img read more

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Testing Hawking radiation in laboratory black hole analogues

first_img More information: Silke Weinfurtner et al. Measurement of Stimulated Hawking Emission in an Analogue System, Physical Review Letters (2011). DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.106.021302 F. Belgiorno et al. Hawking Radiation from Ultrashort Laser Pulse Filaments, Physical Review Letters (2010). DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.105.203901 Ulf Leonhardt. Questioning the Recent Observation of Quantum Hawking Radiation, Annalen der Physik (2018). DOI: 10.1002/andp.201700114 Jonathan Drori et al. Observation of Stimulated Hawking Radiation in an Optical Analogue, Physical Review Letters (2019). DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.122.010404 “Imagine, like in Einstein’s gedanken experiments, light chasing after another pulse of light,” Leonhardt explained. “Suppose that all the light travels inside an optical fiber. In the fiber glass, the pulse changes the speed of the light chasing it a little, such that the light cannot overtake the pulse. It experiences a white-hole horizon; a place it cannot enter. The front of the pulse acts like the exact opposite: a black-hole horizon, a place the light cannot leave. This is the idea in a nutshell.” Leonhardt and his colleagues published and demonstrated this idea in 2008. Subsequently, they tried to use it to demonstrate Hawking radiation.Hawking radiation has never been directly observed in space, as this is not currently feasible. However, it can be demonstrated in laboratory environments, for instance, using Bose-Einstein condensates, water waves, polaritons or light. In the past, several researchers tried to test Hawking radiation in the lab using these techniques, yet most of their studies were, in fact, problematic and have thus been disputed. Back in 1974, renowned physicist Stephen Hawking amazed the physics world with his theory of Hawking radiation, which suggested that rather than being black, black holes should glow slightly due to quantum effects near the black hole’s event horizon. According to Hawking’s theory, the strong gravitational field around a black hole can affect the production of matching pairs of particles and anti-particles.Should these particles be created just outside the event horizon, the positive member of this pair of particles could escape, resulting in an observed thermal radiation emitting from the black hole. This radiation, which was later termed Hawking radiation, would hence consist of photons, neutrinos and other subatomic particles. The theory of Hawking radiation was among the first to combine concepts from quantum mechanics with Albert Einstein’s theory of General Relativity. “I learned General Relativity in 1997 by lecturing a course, not by taking a course,” Ulf Leonhardt, one of the researchers who carried out the recent study, told Phys.org. “This was a rather stressful experience where I was just a few weeks ahead of the students, but I really got to know General Relativity and fell in love with it. Fittingly, this also happened in Ulm, Einstein’s birthplace. Since then, I have been looking for connections between my field of research, quantum optics and General Relativity. My main goal is to demystify General Relativity. If, as I and others have shown, ordinary optical materials like glass act like curved spaces, then the curved space-time of General Relativity becomes something tangible, without losing its charm.” In collaboration with his first Ph.D. student Paul Piwnicki, Leonhardt put together some initial ideas of how to create optical black holes, which were published in 1999 and 2000. In 2004, he finally achieved a method that actually worked, which is the one used in his recent study. Journal information: Physical Review Letters The parabolic mirror in the background focuses dark-red light into the fibre that shines bright-blue on the other end. A tiny bit of the bright light is Hawking radiation, which the researchers extracted and measured. Credit: Drori et al. Citation: Testing Hawking radiation in laboratory black hole analogues (2019, January 25) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-01-hawking-laboratory-black-hole-analogues.html For instance, some past findings obtained with intense light pulses in optical media turned out to be inconsistent with theory. Rather than observing Hawking radiation made by horizons, as the authors themselves found out later, they had, in fact, observed horizon-less radiation created by their light pulses, as they exceeded the phase velocity of light for other frequencies. Other studies attempting to observe Hawking radiation on water waves and in Bose-Einstein condensates also turned out to be problematic. Discussing the outcomes of these studies with Physics World, Leonhardt wrote, “I greatly admire the heroism of the people doing them, and their technical skills and expertise, but this is a difficult subject.” He also wrote: “Horizons are perfect traps; it is easy to get trapped behind them without noticing, and this applies to horizon research, as well. We learn and become experts according to the classic definition: An expert is someone who has made all possible mistakes (and learned from them).” As proven by previous efforts, observing Hawking radiation in the lab is a highly challenging task. The study carried out by Leonhardt and his colleagues could be the first valid demonstration of Hawking radiation in optics. “Black holes are surrounded by their event horizons,” Leonhardt explained. “The horizon marks the border where light can no longer escape. Hawking predicted that at the horizon light quanta—photons—are created. One photon appears outside the horizon and is able to get away, while its partner appears on the inside and falls into the black hole. According to quantum mechanics, particles are associated with waves. The photon on the outside belongs to a wave that oscillates with positive frequency, the wave of its partner on the inside oscillates with a negative frequency.”In their study, Leonhardt and his colleagues made light out of positive and negative frequencies. Their positive-frequency light was infrared, while the negative-frequency one was ultraviolet. The researchers detected both of them and then compared them with Hawking’s theory.The tiny bit of ultraviolet light that they managed to detect using sensitive equipment is the first clear sign of stimulated Hawking radiation in optics. This radiation is referred to as ‘stimulated’ because it is stimulated by the probe light that the researchers sent in to chase the pulses. “Our most important finding, perhaps, is that black holes are not something out of the ordinary, but that they closely resemble what light pulses do to ordinary light in fibers,” Leonhardt said. “Demonstrating subtle quantum phenomena like Hawking radiation is not easy. It takes extremely short pulses, extraordinary fibers, sensitive equipment and, last but not least, the hard work of dedicated students. But even Hawking radiation is something one can actually understand.”The study carried out by Leonhardt and his colleagues is an important contribution to the physics field, as it provides the first laboratory demonstration of Hawking radiation in optics. The researchers also found the analogy to event horizons to be remarkably robust, despite pushing the optics to the extreme, which increased their confidence in the validity of their theories. “We now need to improve our setup to get ready for the next big challenge: the observation of spontaneous Hawking radiation,” Leonhardt said. “In this case, the radiation is not stimulated anymore, except by the inevitable fluctuations of the quantum vacuum. Our next goals are steps that improve the apparatus and test various aspects of stimulated Hawking radiation, before going all the way to spontaneous Hawking radiation.” , Physics Worldcenter_img Explore further © 2019 Science X Network This image shows an electron-microscope picture of the interior of one of the researchers’ fibres. The fibres are sophisticated photopic-crystal fibres. They are as thin as a human hair and inside they carry hole structures that guide the light in the centre. Credit: Drori et al. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Researchers at Weizmann Institute of Science and Cinvestav recently carried out a study testing the theory of Hawking radiation on laboratory analogues of black holes. In their experiments, they used light pulses in nonlinear fiber optics to establish artificial event horizons. Black holes dissolving like aspirin: How Hawking changed physicslast_img read more

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