Prep Sports Roundup: 10/5

first_img Written by Brad James Tags: Brock Justesen/Cesar Lemus/Chance Clawson/Dallin Cox/Ethan Bowles/Manti/North Sanpete FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailFootball3-A SouthMANTI, Utah-Chance Clawson threw a 41-yard touchdown pass to Ethan Bowles and ran for another score as the North Sanpete Hawks smacked Manti 28-7 Friday in 3-A South football action. Brock Justesen added a pair of touchdown runs and Cesar Lemus stepped up with two interceptions in key situations for the Hawks, as they improved to 3-1 in 3-A South play and dropped Manti to 1-3 in region competition. Dallin Cox had a 3-yard touchdown run in the loss for the Templars.RICHFIELD, Utah-Kasey Briggs threw a 92-yard touchdown pass to Parker Clawson and the Summit Academy Bears routed Richfield 33-0 in 3-A South football action Friday.NEPHI, Utah-Tristan Tonozzi had a pair of touchdown runs and the Juan Diego Soaring Eagle held off Juab 34-32 Friday in 3-A South football action. Easton Wright had four touchdown passes and Cade Bowring added a 2-yard touchdown run in the loss for the Wasps.2-A SouthMOAB, Utah-Corbin Arbon had a 76-yard touchdown run, helping the Grand Red Devils to a 21-0 rout of Beaver in 2-A South football action Friday.ENTERPRISE, Utah-Ryan Holt had a pair of touchdown runs and the Enterprise Wolves edged South Sevier 22-21 Friday in 2-A South football action. Tyson Chisholm had a 75-yard touchdown run and returned an interception 86 yards for another score in defeat for the Rams. Tracen Winkel added an 11-yard scoring reception to Wyatt Morrison in the loss for South Sevier.BLANDING, Utah-Corbin Palmer tossed a pair of touchdown passes and the San Juan Broncos smacked North Sevier 31-7 in 2-A South football action Friday. Taylor Crane returned to the lineup for the Wolves and threw a 35-yard scoring pass to deep threat Kody Christensen in the loss.2-A NorthGUNNISON, Utah-Austin Topham threw a 3-yard touchdown pass to Jake Jackson and ran for another score as the Delta Rabbits bested Gunnison 32-18 in 2-A North football action Friday. Jackson also had a touchdown run for the Rabbits and Jayden Peterson added two more scoring jaunts for Delta in the win. Caden Madsen threw two touchdown passes in defeat for the Bulldogs and Kolton Peterson added another scoring run for Gunnison.KAMAS, Utah-Kael Atkinson tossed four touchdown passes and the South Summit Wildcats pounded Millard 47-6 Friday in 2-A North football action. Sam Marshall hauled in a 13-yard touchdown pass from Kael Myers in defeat for the Eagles.1-A SouthKANAB, Utah-Bryson Barnes tossed five touchdown passes as the Milford Tigers overpowered Kanab 42-26 in 1-A South football action Friday. Marcus Fox threw a 34-yard touchdown pass to Kayden McDonald, while McDonald ran for another score and Carter Jackman hauled in a 19-yard scoring pass as well from Fox in defeat for the Cowboys.Girls SoccerNon-RegionSANDY, Utah-Hanna Bruce and Sami Morris each scored as the Waterford Ravens blanked Manti 2-0 in non-region girls soccer action Friday. Jaime Meyer posted the shutout in victory for the Ravens. October 5, 2018 /Sports News – Local Prep Sports Roundup: 10/5last_img read more

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Briefs

first_img May 15, 2004 Regular News Briefs Shepherd named D’Alemberte professor Florida State University College of Law Professor Lois Shepherd has been appointed the D’Alemberte Professor of Law. The D’Alemberte Professorship was donated to the law school by the Miami-based Steel Hector & Davis. It was named for Sandy D’Alemberte, a former partner in the firm who served as dean of the law school from 1984-1989, and as president of the university from 1993-2003.“Steel Hector & Davis is committed to the Florida State University College of Law and the success of its outstanding students,” said Joseph Klock, the firm’s managing partner. “Several of the firm’s partners and associates are graduates. We are delighted that this endowment was awarded to Lois.”Shepherd, an associate professor, teaches contracts, professional responsibility and bioethics, and the law. Her upcoming book, titled The Bioethics and Law Casebook, is being published by the Aspen Press. Little wins civil liberties award Cheryl Little, executive director of the Miami-based Florida Immigrant Advocacy Center, will be presented with the 2004 Nelson Poynter Civil Liberties Award for her “outstanding commitment to preserving individual rights and liberties” at the American Civil Liberties Union Foundation of Florida’s 25th Annual Nelson Poynter Civil Liberties Award Dinner.Little has dedicated nearly 20 years to protecting immigrants, especially Haitians, from arbitrary treatment by government.The event will begin at 8 p.m., preceded by an open bar cocktail and hors d’oeuvres reception at 6:30 p.m., May 22, at the Hyatt Regency Coral Gables, 50 Alhambra Plaza, in Coral Gables.Michael Putney, senior political reporter for WPLG Channel 10, and contributing columnist for The Miami Herald, will serve as master of ceremonies.Little has challenged the detention of hundreds of Haitian asylum-seekers at the Krome Detention Center, arguing government policies discriminate against Haitians based on race and national origin. She also opposed a Justice Department plan to give local and state police the power to enforce immigration laws in the wake of September 11.In 1996, Congress prohibited the federally-funded Legal Services Corporation from assisting undocumented aliens. That same year, Little started the Florida Immigrant Advocacy Center on a few hundred thousand dollars in grants and with a small staff. They inherited 3,000 cases, mostly Hispanic clients. FIAC has since grown to four offices, 18 attorneys, 17 paralegals, a $2.3 million budget, and more than 30,000 cases closed.The featured speaker at the dinner will be Barry Steinhardt, director of the National ACLU’s Program on Technology and Liberty. He will discuss the ACLU’s fight against government and private sector data-mining programs such as the MATRIX, a database surveillance system originating in Florida that creates dossiers about individuals from government databases and private-sector companies that compile files on Americans for profit. He also will give a recap of the ACLU’s lawsuit challenging the Transportation Security Administration’s “no-fly” list.Tickets are $150 per person. For reservations contact Elaina Ozrovitz at (305) 576-2337, ext. 13, or via email at [email protected] Law Week activities focus on Brown v. Board of Ed. Florida lawyers, statewide and national bar associations, and community and judicial groups participated in a variety of activities to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the U. S. Supreme Court’s decision in Brown v. Board of Education during Law Week.Activities, ranging from speaking engagements at local schools to mock trial competitions, commemorated the significance of the decision that desegregated public schools.This year’s national theme is “To Win Equality Law: Brown v. Board of Education at 50.”“This case changed our nation. It reinforces the constitutional right that all people are equally protected under the law regardless of race, “ said Harold N. Hume, chair of the Bar’s Voluntary Bar Liaison Committee and statewide Law Week chair. “Law Week gives us an opportunity to share with our communities our commitment to the rule of law and our commitment to a fair and impartial system of justice.”This year marks the 46th annual nationwide observance of Law Day. In 1961, May 1 was designated by joint resolution of Congress as the official day to celebrate Law Day. In 1998, the Florida Legislature established the annual commemoration as an official day and designated week.“On Law Day, I think our nation can reflect on and consider how we might as a country and how we might as a people appreciate the contributions that ethnic minorities have made to (the) world and American civilization,” said ABA President Dennis W. Archer, in an interview discussing the impact of Brown v. Board of Education. Students tour courthouse Fifth-grade students toured the George Edgecomb Courthouse to begin the traditional kick-off of the Courthouse Tours during Law Week.Lawyers from the Hillsborough County Bar Association show the student the highlights of their professional arena. After observing court proceedings and walking through the halls of justice, the students gathered in Courtroom 1 each morning during the week at 11:15 a.m. to talk with judges and watch a short video, Who is Linda Brown?, which provides some clues as to why their present day classrooms look like they do. To Win Equality by Law: Brown v Board at 50 is the theme selected by the AB A for Law Week this year because of the historic anniversary of this legal decision. In the Brown v Board of Education case, the court struck down laws segregating public schools — because they recognized the need to fulfill the promise of the Constitution to a little girl named Linda Brown and other students like her. Edgecomb Bar celebrates Brown , awards scholarships The George Edgecomb Bar Association recently hosted its 21st Annual Law Week Scholarship Banquet in Tampa.To celebrate the 50th anniversary of Brown v. Board of Education an exhibit on the landmark case — on loan from the City of Tampa — was displayed at a reception before the banquet. GEBA also recognized the local school desegregation case, Manning v. Hillsborough County School Board, by acknowledging the families of the four plaintiffs of the case. Judge Elizabeth Kovachevich, who was involved in the case, was awarded the Francisco Rodriguez Award in recognition of her leadership in the federal bar and her excellence as a jurist.Florida Bar President Miles McGrane, along with presidents of Virgil Hawkins Florida Chapter of the National Bar Association, the Hillsborough County Bar Association, and the Hillsborough Association for Women Lawyers were in attendance.This year’s keynote speaker was Alison Bethel, the Washington bureau chief of The Detroit News. GEBA also awarded three scholarships to Tampa high school students. GEBA’s premiere scholarship is co-sponsored by the Hillsborough Education Foundation and provides four years of tuition at a Florida university. This year’s recipient of the scholarship is KeJuan R. Nedd, a freshman at King High School, where he has a GPA of 3.40. KeJuan plans to attend the University of South Florida and desires to become an astronomer.GEBA also awarded two $1,000 scholarships to Vincent E. Adejumo and Kristen S. Pinder. Adejumo is a senior at Middleton High School who plans to attend Florida State University this fall and major in computer science and then go to law school. ystems. Pinder is a senior at King High School and plans to go to the University of Florida this fall and major in veterinarian science. Gift to Florida State will foster mentoring Possessing the power to recommend sentencing for defendants can be daunting for a prosecutor right out of law school. But as an assistant state attorney in Duval County in the early 1980s, Michael Atter could turn to a long-time friend and seasoned attorney to help him gain a fresh perspective on tough cases.“When you’re a young attorney, you don’t have the real-life experience to flesh out what should be done in certain circumstances, so it’s helpful to have someone help you analyze the situation,” said Atter, a 1979 graduate of the Florida State University College of Law, and now a partner in the Jacksonville firm of Wood, Atter & Associates. His daughter, Lenorae Atter, is a 2003 graduate of the law school and works in his firm.Atter is hopeful that because of his recent $100,000 gift to the law school, students will have the opportunity to find the type of mentoring that helped him. The Atter Family Mentoring Scholarship will provide a summer stipend for students to be mentored by distinguished litigators in the Jacksonville area.Atter said he formed the idea for the mentoring scholarship after judging mock trial competitions involving Florida State law students.“I was impressed with their preparation, how they presented themselves, their verbal and nonverbal skills, and their well-thought-out arguments,” he said. “Students who have developed those skills will be invaluable to a law firm. But when you argue aggressively for a client, it can be easy to fall into the trap of forgetting about professional courtesy. The manner in which you go about doing your job doesn’t have to be offensive. That does a disservice to the attorney and to the law profession as a whole.” Caribbean Bar launches Central Florida chapter The Caribbean Bar Association recently launched its first chapter in Central Florida at the Marriott International Hotel in Orlando.Under the auspices of the consul generals from Jamaica, St. Lucia, and Trinidad and Tobago, and other local Caribbean-American organizations in the Central Florida area, the launching reception welcomed over 100 local businesses, community leaders, and members of the bench and bar.“Due to the growing Caribbean-American community in the Central Florida area, including Orange, Seminole, Volusia, and other counties, local attorneys of Caribbean descent in the area sensed the need to duplicate some of the similar efforts, initiatives, and successes in South Florida,” said Dahlia A. Walker, president of the Caribbean Bar Association.The interim executive board of the Central Florida chapter includes Michelle Tomlinson, president; Yolanda Lewis, vice president; and Dennis Chen, secretary/treasurer.The weekend’s activities also included a citizenship and voters’ registration drive at the Metro-West Church of the Nazarene in Orlando. Over 60 persons and families attended and completed their naturalization applications with the assistance of volunteer attorneys from the Caribbean Bar Association.For more information visit www.caribbeanbar.org. Mediators hold canned food drive At The Florida Academy of Professional Mediators’ Annual Education Conference in Orlando, the academy’s Community Involvement Committee held its first canned food drive.Members attending the conference were asked to donate at least one can of food for the needy, and they generously responded, said Bruce A. Blitman, chair of the Community Involvement Committee.The food was collected by the Second Harvest Food Bank of Central Florida. The food drive collected approximately 100 pounds of food, which will provide about 70 meals to hungry men, women, and children. This food will be distributed to nonprofit agencies serving those in need in Central Florida.As a result of the success of this initial food drive, the academy will sponsor another food drive in conjunction with the Florida Dispute Resolution Center’s Annual Mediation and Arbitration Conference in Orlando in late August. Seminar attendees will again be invited to donate at least one can of food when they come to the DRC conference. People who do not have time to shop or do not want to pack non-perishable food when they travel are encouraged to contribute with a tax-deductible financial gift.For more information about the academy’s food drive, contact Blitman at (954) 437-3446 or e-mail [email protected] Fowler White, Ernst & Young collect clothes Fowler White Boggs Banker and Ernst & Young pooled their resources to team up for the Dress for Success clothing drive in April and collected more than 150 business suits and dresses and more than 300 skirts, blouses, and slacks for the nonprofit organization.Dress for Success provides interview suits, confidence boosts, and career development to low-income women entering the workforce. Women are referred to Dress for Success by nonprofit organizations. Each woman receives three business outfits when she has a job interview and two more when she gets the job.Ceci Berman of Fowler White and Heather Willyard and Amy Keweshan with Ernst & Young coordinated the effort on behalf of their firms. NASA honors LeConey Miami native Amy Voigt LeConey has gone from being a hostess at the old General Cinema 10 at Miracle Center to being named by NASA’s legal program as the first recipient of the Rising Star Award for her support during the Columbia investigation activities and her role in a land transfer project.The 28-year-old Florida State University trained lawyer was presented with the award, which recognizes the best of NASA’s junior attorneys, at an April 27 conference at NASA’s Stennis Space Center in Mississippi.With less than 24 hours notice after the accident that claimed Columbia and her seven-member crew, she was sent to Barksdale Air Force Base field operations site in Louisiana to be the legal liaison to NASA’s Mishap Investigation Team.In the four weeks that she was there, LeConey worked on establishing jurisdiction over crew remains, handling financial and interagency coordination issues with the Federal Emergency Management Administration covering search and recovery issues in 29 states, coordinating a Department of Justice site visit to Barksdale, and overseeing data handling and impoundment procedures at Barksdale, Lufkin, Texas, and Carswell, disaster field offices.“Amy’s amazing success in providing sophisticated legal support to the huge and complex search and recovery effort was no fluke,” said Paul Pastorek, NASA’s General Counsel. “She made a presentation to the firm on an impending major environmental and real estate matter a couple of years ago that knocked everyone’s socks off. We’re fortunate to have her, and a group of other young lawyers just like her. They’re really excited about NASA and its mission. I hope they’re all still around, serving as our legal leadership when we land on Mars.” Smith lauded by law enforcement Eleventh Circuit Assistant State Attorney Michael Smith of the office’s organized crime division has been awarded the 2003 Law Enforcement Officer’s Foundation and the Dade County Chiefs of Police Law Enforcement Officer’s Award for State Prosecutor of the Year.This award was presented, not just for Smith’s “outstanding prosecutorial abilities” in the fields of money laundering and electronic surveillance, but also in recognition of his “commitment to achieving justice in every one of his cases.” Baker & Hostetler works with school The Orlando office of Baker & Hostetler celebrated its 25th anniversary by donating $25,000 to Orange Center Elementary School, as part of the Baker’s Educational Service Team program.“Baker & Hostetler has been our partner in education since 2001, they have made and continue to make outstanding contributions to our school, both in financial and volunteer support — they have truly made a difference to our students, our teachers, and our staff,” said Cynthia Drayton, principal of Orange Center.last_img read more

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Man Killed in Centereach Crash, Two Others Injured

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York A man was killed and two others injured in a two-car crash early Saturday morning in Centereach, Suffolk County police said.Moments before the fatal crash, the man was working on another vehicle along the right shoulder on northbound Nicolls Road, a police spokeswoman said. After he was done, the man got into a van and was attempting to make a U-turn when he was struck by another van entering Nicolls Road from Middle Country Road just after 1 a.m., the spokeswoman said.The man, who was not immediately identified pending notification of next of kin, was ejected from the vehicle, police said. He was pronounced dead at the scene, police said.A passenger in his van was injured, as was the driver of the other vehicle involved in the crash. They were both transported to Stony Brook University Hospital with non-life threatening injuries, police said. The vehicles were impounded for safety checks and the investigation is continuing, police said. Anyone with information on the crash is asked to call the Sixth Squad at 631-854-8652 or Crime Stoppers at 1-800-220-TIPS. Update: Police have identified the victim of the crash as 51-year-old Samir Patel of Holtsville.last_img read more

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Innovation and IT in a VUCA world

first_img 2SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Tim Foley Tim’s role is to design and deliver creative alliances, marketing & sales strategies to find the organizations that know technology is driving them and are ready to transform. Web: www.thinkstack.co Details I am of that odd generation that lives between Gen X and Millennials. Technology and digital transformation have influenced my life at every turn, I am not young enough to have been born into technology and not old enough that it’s cute that I don’t get it. I’ve been in the eye of a transformation tornado throughout my early life, school and career…From playing outside to video games.Text books and fountain pens to word processors.Film to digital photography.Print to digital media.Face to face connections to social media.File cabinets to servers.Data centers to the cloud.And now the office to remote working.I’m fascinated by the use of technology to accelerate processes, mitigate risk, connect and grow.Through my work at Think|Stack I have enjoyed connecting with the passionate rebels in the credit union industry who are challenging themselves and the movement to innovate. I love to think about how history has led us to the transformations we are witnessing today.Gabriel-Alphonse Desjardins, founding father of credit unions, established over 200 Caisses Populaires in his lifetime. During his early years in the newspaper industry he witnessed the rise of pulp papermaking allowing faster publishing and mass distribution and the introduction of telegraph networks to send information – it would’ve seemed like magic seeing that first telegram message arrive from hundreds of miles away!In his work as a courthouse stenographer he would have seen the introduction of the first stenograph machines and put down a pen to use a machine.Innovation and technological breakthroughs were world changing in his lifetime from 1854 – 1920.The bicycle, radio, plastics, flight and let’s not forget cornflakes and the can opener!He also lived during two pandemics.I’d like to think this wonderous change and adversity around him fueled the innovative spirit that drove him to build and transform an industry and leave a legacy that has changed all of our lives.Imagine for a moment explaining our world of volatility, uncertainty, complexity and ambiguity to him. He may argue not much has changed. Innovation may have accelerated but the principles remain the same – embrace and leverage all that is available to you, approach it with childlike amazement or be left behind and unprepared.This has never been more relevant than right now.Information technology, “IT” has networked its way into every aspect of our lives. IT is in the hands and minds of our children, our employees, and our customers.IT is in our cars, homes, businesses, and all systems we touch. IT is even in the words – VolatilITy, ComplexITy and AmbiguITy. (You can imagine my disappointment when UncertainTy didn’t work, although it’s in there somewhere!)The question is are you letting IT govern you or are you governing it? In all the noise, we as humans can still hold the upper hand, and through the power of community and team thinking we can bring human-only traits of creativity, imagination, intuition, ethics, and emotion to bear.People before technology, human centered design – we are the why, IT is the how. The past few weeks have shown us that in a VUCA world you don’t know what your people and customers might ask or need you to be next year, next week or even tomorrow.You must build culture, technology infrastructure, and team environments that are flexible and responsive to change and innovation.If you don’t, your competitors will. The companies that are winning today are built on flexible platforms ready to be nimble and pivot to any global and market conditions.IT and all of its possibilities may seem chaotic and the current situation overwhelming, but there are ways to seek and find answers.Many people are practicing meditation right now. One of the disarming things you realize when you close your eyes and try to quiet your mind is that the chaos is actually inside, the outside world changes when you shift your inner state. First look within to set your vision and goals, then look outside to find the support you need to realize them.Through effective communication, collaboration, and sharing of best practices within your organizations and communities and by allowing diverse thought, you can bring your teams together to first establish who you aspire to be and then harness IT to support and power your visions and plans into reality.Intentional cultural change takes courage, vulnerability, and empathy, but you are not alone. Throughout your organizations and vendor networks you will find all the resources you need. Everyone you know is at a different stage of their digital transformation journey and everyone is willing to help.Despite the challenges facing us, it’s an amazing time to be alive and we have an opportunity (and responsibility) to leverage the technologies at our disposal to build a new way of living and working.Together we can shift Volatility to Stability, Uncertainty to Certainty, Complexity to Simplicity, and Ambiguity to Clarity and that can lead to the growth of our communities, cooperatives, and our HumanITy. Yes, that has IT in it too!last_img read more

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Long Island Schools Mark National Coming Out Day

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Students at Long Island schools marked National Coming Out Day three days early on Friday since the LGBT awareness event held annually on Oct. 11 this year falls on Sunday, when schools are closed.Long Island LGBT Services Network staffers fanned out to 83 local schools—up from 60 schools last year—as a part of a campaign that includes seminars to talk about the issues and handing out palm cards detailing statistics such as 80 percent of LGBT kids reporting being bullied either at school or on their way in the past year.“I’d really like to see every single school on Long Island have a [Gay-Straight Alliance],” said David Kilmnick, CEO of the nonprofit group. “We really want to start educating from the earliest age about diversity and different kinds of families. I think everyone in schools needs to be talking about these issues and have things in place to support the students, their friends and families.”Although the U.S. Supreme Court’s ruling in June legalizing same-sex marriage nationwide, 2016 Republican presidential candidates are promising to change laws and policies reversing LGBT equality—suggesting that despite gains, equality remains elusive.“After all, we are in the business of education,” said one Suffolk County school employee, who asked not to be named because they were not authorized to speak to the media. “So, why not extend education to social and emotional issues?”As a part of the campaign, more than 80,000 students—LGBT youths and allies alike—are walking from class to class through colorful poster-plastered hallways, proudly donning rainbow ribbons or supportive ally stickers.“I think in general,” Kilmnick continued, “when there’s a high visibility of anything LGBT, people think we have an agenda. The only agenda is making sure every kid is safe in school.”With all the gradual change in society, coming out seems like a fading necessity. Kilmnick, however, doesn’t think so.“There’s still an assumption that everyone is heterosexual.”It’s called “sexual profiling”—the assumption of someone’s sexual orientation—and it actually works both ways: straight masculine women or feminine men presumed as homosexuals or, as Kilmnick described, simple things such as restaurants mistakenly bagging a same-sex couple’s leftovers in separate bags.“It’s innocent but very telling,” said Kilmnick. “That may be hard for some people to understand, but it’s those little actions that still say a lot. We still have a long way to go and until people change their minds and don’t make assumptions about people’s sexual orientation, people will always need to come out.”In the meantime, awareness and education through efforts like the National Coming Out Day awareness campaign hope to address these and other issues.While many public locations such as libraries host Gay-Straight Alliances, Kilmnick advised anyone – student or staff – interested in starting a GSA club to reach out to the Long Island Gay and Lesbian Network through their website or to call their Bay Shore office at 631-665-2300.last_img read more

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Golf Range opened in ACI marina Dubrovnik

first_imgIn the ACI marina Dubrovnik, a beautiful green area has sprung up on the surface of a tennis court, created for enjoyment and relaxation during golf practice and a break from cruising, ie a new Golf Range practice area.With this innovative project, ACI Marina Dubrovnik has become the first marina on the Adriatic to offer such unique content to its guests. On the occasion of the opening of the Golf Range, the director of ACI, Kristijan Pavić, pointed out: “We thought that this was a nice opportunity, above all to raise the tourist attraction of Dubrovnik and for visitors who love golf clubs. This project complements the nautical offer of the ACI marina Dubrovnik, but is also open to all citizens and tourists who come to our city.”The project of building “GOLF RANGE CONCEPT” is the latest idea to build a golf practice area on the size of a tennis court. With its innovation and well-developed concept, the Golf Range Concept promotes golf and makes it accessible to all, and consists of a golf driving range and a mini golf course that includes all elements of a professional golf course where all shots from real golf courses can be practiced. “This is my first time in this part of Croatia and I must say that I am very glad, I came here for golf. I am glad that golf has descended a little lower than Stubreč in Croatia, and I hope that one day real golf will spring up in this part of Croatia as well.”Said professional golf coach Bogdan Palovšnik.The Golf Range Concept project was built on the surface of a tennis court, ie on approximately 600-800 m2. In the construction of the golf practice, the most modern materials and artificial grass intended for golf were used, which gives the possibility for the golf practice to be open all year round.last_img read more

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Whitewater Ski Team Goes Big

first_imgFueling the nearly 200% enrollment increase is one of the snowiest winters in recent memory, with Whitewater Resort leading the North American pack in snowfall. Long-time ski team president Tracy Punchard is serving her last shift as fearless leader, with this season being a most fitting farewell for someone who has had such a large part to play in the club’s current upturn.“Being a part of the ski team is as much fun as skiing itself. The team’s success has been very rewarding,” said Tracy.This excitement was easy to see at last week’s Rio Tinto Nancy Greene Ski League race at Phoenix Mountain near Grand Forks.The sun broke through the clouds first thing in the morning, the mountain was covered in plenty of wind-buffed powder, and the down home feeling at Phoenix reminded everyone how valuable small family ski hills are—and how important it is to preserve them.As ribbons were presented and cheeseburgers were consumed, kids of varying ages continued to run up the mountain and throw snowballs. The League’s main intention to engender good sportsmanship and fun through skiing was never better witnessed.In the following weeks, Whitewater Ski Team will participate in zone races and speed camps at Kimberley Alpine Resort, and then get set to break hearts at Salmo’s Nancy Greene race on February 14. By Graham TraceyThe Whitewater ski team has made history this season with a record- breaking enrollment of 140 athletes, 7 of whom are on their way to the BC games after qualifiers at Red Mountain in mid January.“When you consider that only 20 athletes go to the games from the entire Kootenay Zone,’ said head coach Dylan Henderson, ‘we as a team feel we’re pulling our weight nicely.’”last_img read more

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