Studies hint that over-the-counter treatments could be effective against COVID-19

first_imgIn past results, mostly taken from smaller groups like infected passengers on the ill-fated Diamond Princess cruise ship, about half of all patients were asymptomatic. That number has frequently been used when working out the potential spread of COVID-19. Some researchers and politicians (especially politicians) have even projected much higher numbers of asymptomatic carriers to support specific theories or actions. If only a quarter of COVID-19 patients are asymptomatic, that may mean that the threat represented by asymptomatic carriers is smaller than has been estimated. It would also mean that calculations setting the number of cases far above the number of positive tests based on the idea that many of the infected never developed symptoms could also be way off.The U.K. is also host to the massive RECOVERY project, a set of interlocking COVID-19 studies that has helped to both show that Trump’s beloved hydroxychloroquine is ineffective, and that the steroid dexamethasone helps patients receiving breathing assistance. On Tuesday, PharmaTimes reported RECOVERY was about to test the efficacy of something else: aspirin.The idea that aspirin might be helpful against COVID-19 has been debated since very early in the pandemic. Last February, researchers in China announced that they were beginning trials of using aspirin as part of COVID-19 treatment with expectations that it could help with the damage COVID-19 can cause to both the blood vessels and the lungs, and early results appeared positive. Since then, many hospitals around the world have incorporated this most common of drugs into their COVID-19 regime—but it’s far from universal. – Advertisement – By doing a deep dive into patient data—including both those who had COVID-19 and those who did not—researchers discovered that those reporting regular use of melatonin had a 30% lower rate of testing positive for COVID-19. That seems like a fairly fantastic result … but it heaps up over a large dataset even when adjusted for other factors. And here’s something that seems to really stand out: For Black patients in the study, melatonin use seemed to cut the odds of being infected by COVID-19 in half. This type of study is notorious for drawing a statistical connection between unrelated items, and there could easily be coincidental causes behind this data. Maybe people who take melatonin take better care of their health in general. Maybe they’re just better rested. In any case, additional sources are now being examined to see if similar results can be found.Finally, a drug that’s not over-the-counter but definitely seems appropriate for 2020 may also turn out to be an unexpected COVID-19 fighter. In a study published today in JAMA, researchers at Washington University in St. Louis found that patients receiving the antidepressant fluvoxamine were much less likely to develop serious COVID-19 symptoms when compared to those receiving a placebo. How much less likely is hard to say … because it appears to be infinite. As in none of the fluvoxamine patients displayed worsening conditions during the study. That’s a fantastic result … but it was also a very small study. So small that it’s not likely to change treatment regimens. However, if an antidepressant seems like a strange treatment for a virus, note that fluvoxamine is a group known as “Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors” (SSRIs), which have a powerful effect on inflammation.Aspirin, melatonin, SSRIs … they may not seem like the most obvious tools to use against a virus that has proven to be so deadly. But they have the advantage of being extremely widely used and well-understood.Big note: I’m not a doctor. This article should not be taken as medical advice. Don’t begin taking new medications without checking in with your health provider. Thanks. In October, a study published in Anesthesia and Analgesia looked at 412 patients. Of those, 76% did not get aspirin, and 24% got low-dose aspirin, the same kind often taken by heart patients. Patients who received low-dose aspirin were 44% less likely to end up on a ventilator and 43% less likely to require admission to the ICU. The number of patients studied was small, but those results are more than dramatic enough to indicate why RECOVERY is taking another look at a drug that really has been considered a “miracle” before. The very broad effects of aspirin—fever lowering, reducing clumping of platelets, lowering inflammation—may be a good match to the broad spectrum of symptoms caused by the coronavirus.But aspirin isn’t the only off-the-shelf product to generate new interest from coronavirus researchers. As Science News reports, researchers at the Cleveland Clinic found evidence that there’s another widely available product that might be a big positive when it comes to COVID-19. In this case, while it’s often seen in the form of a pill, it’s not really a drug; it’s the sleep-regulating hormone melatonin. Melatonin is naturally produced in the body each evening, with production rising as light decreases. When people take synthetic melatonin (in pills that range usually range from 1 mg to dosages far above the generally recommended limit of about 5 mg) it has a pair of sleep-inducing effects.- Advertisement –center_img The University of Bristol reports that it has completed an antibody survey of the “Children of the 90s” community spanning just under 5,000 participants. This group represents a number of British families who had—you guessed it—children in the 1990s. Health researchers have been following both the parents and the children through their lives, so they have a great deal of information on both their health history and personal habits. So their COVID-19 data could be particularly telling.In the latest survey, 4.3% of those tested had developed antibodies to COVID-19. These people were twice as likely to be from the “children” group as the “parents” group. However, even though most of the people who had COVID-19 at some point were under 30—the group generally thought to have the mildest cases of the disease—only about 25% of all participants reported being asymptomatic. – Advertisement –last_img read more

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Treasure Coast neighborhoods remain underwater after heavy rain

first_imgTreasure Coast neighborhoods are currently underwater after heavy rainfall and thunderstorms.Our news partner, WPTV, captured video of communities in Martin County around 9 a.m. and saw streets underwater, cars driving through several inches of floodwater, and floodwater coming up to the front doors of many homes.WATCH CHOPPER 5 VIDEO: A flood watch is in effect for Martin, St. Lucie, Indian River, and Okeechobee counties until Saturday afternoon, and Palm Beach County until Friday morning.last_img

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Women’s teams head to Hampshire for County Finals showdown

first_img5 Sep 2016 Women’s teams head to Hampshire for County Finals showdown The stage is set for the showdown for the English Women’s County Finals with six teams preparing to go head-to-head next week at Waterlooville Golf Club in Hampshire.They include Norfolk, who will make their first appearance at the final for 42 years when they represent the East region. Staffordshire, from Midlands North, will return after an absence of 15 years.The other finalists are: Gloucestershire from the South West, Surrey from the South, Buckinghamshire from Midlands South and Yorkshire from the North.The title of English Women’s County Champions is one of the most sought-after and keenly contested in the calendar and county pride will be fiercely on display during the five-day round robin tournament, which starts on Monday, 12 September.Yorkshire will be seeking their 12th title, Surrey their 11th and Staffordshire their fifth, while the other three counties are all targeting their first win.The players will be challenged by the fast greens and tight fairways of Waterlooville’s parkland layout. This will be the first time the club has hosted a national championship and President Stephen Millett said: “The members are very excited that our course has been selected by England Golf and we will be pulling out all the stops to make it a truly memorable occasion.”Ladies’ captain Allison Bolam added: “This is a great compliment to our club. The prestige of the County Finals is growing every year and it will be thrilling to watch some of the best amateur golfers in the country competing for the title on our fairways – and to see how Waterlooville is meant to be played!”The competitors include the Yorkshire pair of Curtis Cup player Rochelle Morris and Olivia Winning, the Scottish open stroke play champion who helped England’s women become European team champions this summer.Two of the youngest players will be Surrey’s Annabell Fuller, 14, and Gloucestershire’s Ffion Tynan, 13. Fuller is a girl international and the winner of the Sir Henry Cooper Junior Masters, while Tynan is the English U14 girls’ champion. Norfolk’s team includes girl international, Amelia Williamson, 16, while Surrey’s Martha Lewis is an U16 international.Inci Mehmet of Surrey and Bethan Popel of Gloucestershire have both represented the England women’s team while Jo Ashmore of Norfolk has been a senior international.The teams:Buckinghamshire, captained by Phillipa CookGeorgina Bowers, Megan Dennis, Denise Goodacre, Daisy Kennedy, Thalia Kirby, Alice Kozlowski, Chloe Li, Lucy Matthews, Lizi Sweetnam and Nicole Whitmore.Gloucestershire, captained by Andra KnightBecky Gibbs, Alex Giles, Charlie Hiatt, Ali Kelly, Ebonie Lewis, Caley McGinty, Claudia Ovens, Bethan Popel, Alex Saunders and Ffion Tynan.Norfolk, captained by Tracey WilliamsonEllie Brown, Jasmine Campbell, Jo Herd, Tiff Mills, Shelley Pleasance, Chloe Rowswell, Amy Taylor, Amelia Williamson, Tracey Williamson, Jo Ashmore, Sammy Martin and Megan Mann.Staffordshire, captained by Julia GauntEmily Coleman, Emily Brennan, Olivia Raybould, Morgan Thomas, Debbie Warren, Jenny Rhodes, Georgie Taylor, Gina Wilkie, Julia Gaunt and Annette Deeley.Surrey, captained by Alison TaylorAmber Chana, Tana Churchill, Katie Fewster, Annabell Fuller, Charlotte Griffith, Lauren Horsford, Martha Lewis, Inci Mehmet, Katie Shepherd, Alice Spani-Molella and Nicola Taylor.Yorkshire, captained by Dawn CleggMegan Clarke, Megan Garland, Olivia Hamilton, Hannah Holden, Alison Knowles, Rochelle Morris, Olivia Winning and Melissa Wood.Order of PlayEach match is composed of three foursomes and six singles. Foursomes start at 8.30 and singles at 12.45. Spectators are very welcome.Monday 12 SeptemberBuckinghamshire v GloucestershireSurrey v NorfolkYorkshire v StaffordshireTuesday 13 SeptemberSurrey v YorkshireGloucestershire v NorfolkStaffordshire v BuckinghamshireWednesday 14 SeptemberNorfolk v StaffordshireBuckinghamshire v YorkshireSurrey v GloucestershireThursday 15 SeptemberBuckinghamshire v SurreyGloucestershire v StaffordshireYorkshire v NorfolkFriday 16 SeptemberYorkshire v GloucestershireStaffordshire v SurreyNorfolk v BuckinghamshireClick here for resultslast_img read more

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