Red Hot Chili Peppers Announce Egypt Show At The Great Pyramids Of Giza

first_imgToday, the Red Hot Chili Peppers announced they will play a show at The Great Pyramid in Giza, Egypt on March 15th, 2019. Tickets go on sale this Friday, January 18th at 8 a.m. local time here.In September of 1978, the Grateful Dead traveled to Egypt and played three shows at The Great Pyramids of Giza, cementing the venue as one of the most legendary in the world. You can watch a free webcast of the show below:Red Hot Chili Peppers – Live at the Pyramids – Free Webcast[Video: Red Hot Chili Peppers/Nugs.tv]The Chili Peppers are gearing up for their only other scheduled performances of 2019, in Australia and New Zealand this February and March, in support of their 2016 studio album, The Getaway. The band’s drummer, Chad Smith, recently lent a helping hand as part of Will Farrell‘s “Best Night Of Your Life” benefit concert along with Jerry Seinfeld, Duff McKagan, and Brad Paisley at Hollywood’s Greek Theatre back in early October.For ticketing information and a full list of the Red Hot Chili Peppers’ upcoming tour dates, head to the band’s website.last_img read more

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Forgotten Jewish fighters

first_img A young soldier rushes into battle in this postcard reading “For Home. For the Motherland. For Freedom!” Artist M.A. Andreev Klara Grigorievna Rinkina is 91 years old and lives near Boston. She is 5 feet tall, with silver hair and a pleasant, round face. Rinkina is also a war hero, having served as a Red Army medic during what Russians still call the Great Patriotic War. On special occasions she wears a sweater pinned from neck to waist with medals.One of those special occasions came this month, during an exhibit opening at Pusey Library. Rinkina and five fellow veterans were there — all Jews, whose presence in the Red Army is a little-known story.The Soviet Union gathered a fighting force of 20 million men and women during 1941-45, the largest army fielded during World War II. About 500,000 of the soldiers were Jewish; of these, a third died in combat.In 2005, the Blavatnik Family Foundation determined to redress the neglected story of Soviet Jewish fighters. One result is the exhibit running at the Pusey through Nov. 26: “Lives of the Great Patriotic War,” a multimedia glimpse at surviving Jewish veterans, along with a vivid recounting of the war’s wider context. At the heart of the project are personal stories.The exhibit includes illustrated mini-histories of decisive military actions alongside intimate wartime ephemera — photographs from thousands of drawers and scrapbooks; postcards, millions of which were sent from the front; and battered letters folded into triangles. There would be more letters, one soldier wrote, but war got in the way. “It’s Hitler’s fault.”Making the traveling exhibit possible is an oral history project of the Blavatnik Archive Foundation. Since 2006, said project coordinator Julie Reines Chervinsky, the project has captured on high-definition video the stories of more than 1,100 Jewish veterans from 11 countries.“It’s my hope that this exhibit will shed light on an often-overlooked moment in Russian Jewish history,” archive founder Leonard Blavatnik, M.B.A. ’89, wrote in an email. “Half a million Jewish soldiers, many highly decorated, fought for the Soviet Army against fascism in WWII. It’s our responsibility to never forget the generation that came before us and to extend our eternal gratitude to those who fought so valiantly and sacrificed so much for the betterment of mankind.”The Blavatnik project includes archived interviews with 14 Jewish Red Army veterans in the Boston area, including Rinkina. Video excerpts from all 14 — and from many others — are part of the Pusey exhibit. This postcard shows the Soviet bombardment of oil refineries in Ploesti (Romania). Postcard by V.P. Belkin. Images courtesy of the Blavatnik Archive Foundation Cadet Avraham Levin (third row from bottom, on left) pictured with compatriots in Brest, Belarus in 1940. Holocaust studies have gone a long way in documenting the fate of Jews during the war, but “this part of the history had not been captured,” said Chervinsky, who conducted about 100 of the interviews. Veterans talked about their lives before the war, she said; about their first encounters with the war; and sometimes about postwar humiliations, when Jews were stung and thwarted by explicitly anti-Semitic Soviet propaganda.“We didn’t interview the heroes or the generals,” said Chervinsky, “just the people in the trenches.”The war began for the Soviets on June 22, 1941, the day of the German invasion. Most Soviet Jews had given up outward professions of their faith decades before, and they were full citizens of Stalin’s universe. By the time of the invasion, many inhabited areas to the west that were hit hardest by the invasion, including Lithuania, Belarus, and parts of Ukraine.Veterans in the Blavatnik interviews recalled the burst of patriotism in those dark early days of the war. “Immediately,” said 93-year-old Boston-area veteran Fishel Gershovich Sakhin, “I and many others volunteered to serve in the army. We wanted to be sent to the front.”By the end of the war, 300 Jews had risen to the rank of general or admiral; 160,000 medals and orders were awarded — making Jews the fourth-largest Soviet “nationality” cited for courage.There was patriotism, but many Jewish veterans recorded a second major motivation: revenge, especially as the war shifted against the Germans, moved west, and revealed death camps.For Rinkina, the impulse to revenge came earlier: in 1941, when she discovered German invaders had killed her parents — the first of 49 family members to die at the hands of Nazis. “I want to go to the front,” Rinkina told a recruiter that summer, recounting her story through a translator at the exhibit. “I want to revenge my parents.”At 17, she had already escaped the barbed-wire-bound Jewish ghetto in her native Minsk, where pogroms were common. She had already joined a band of partisan fighters in a Belarus forest. And she had already nearly died, of pneumonia, before she was airlifted to Gorky, and then to Omsk in Siberia.“Look at you — you’re a pretty little girl,” the recruiter told her. He sent Rinkina to nurse’s training. She served from January 1942 until the end of the war, most often in combat theaters: Gomel, the winter Orsha offensives of 1943, Brest, Lodz, Prague, Warsaw, Krakow, and finally Berlin, where she was part of the famed 1st Belorussian Front attack group.Rinkina was at the Elbe River on April 25, 1945, when the Soviet and U.S. armies came together. “Very handsome, nice guys,” she said of the Americans, who traded watches for vodka.She showed photographs from a small scrapbook. In one, Rinkina leans against the flank of a stone lion in front of the bullet-pocked Reichstag.The victory was ecstatic; the war was years of hell. “It was a horrible experience,” said the old veteran’s daughter, Natalia Rinkina. “She never wants it to happen again.” Her mother still has nightmares, she added.The context of those nightmares was provided in a discussion before the exhibit opening, hosted by Provost Alan M. Garber. The panel was moderated by Board of Overseers member Tracy Palandjian ’93, M.B.A. ’97, and included Graham Allison, Douglas Dillon Professor of Government, and two-time ambassador R. Nicholas Burns, the Sultan of Oman Professor of International Relations.In his introductory remarks, Peter L. Thoren, executive vice president of Blavatnik’s Access Industries, considered the history of U.S.-Russia relations. During the Cold War in the 1970s, the two nations were “partners in a fleeting détente,” said Thoren. After the fall of the Soviet Union, he said, the relationship was “improved but fitful.”The high point of that friendlier era, said Allison, started in 1991 with the “huge collaboration” between two uneasy countries in the effort to collect and control Soviet nuclear weapons. As with WWII, he added, “the heaviest lifting was done by the Russians.”Now — with Syria, the Crimea, and other divisions — the United States and Russia are back in a “doldrum” resembling the Cold War, said Allison.At center stage is Vladimir Putin, who, said Burns, “has brought back Cold War passions.” Allison agreed. “If you were central casting, you couldn’t do better than Putin.” He called the present Russian regime “a KGB-retro machine,” with which “relations will not get better” any time soon.At least the immediate crisis has eased, said Burns, in part because Putin “knows he can’t afford more sanctions.”Underneath the present is the past, the panelists said. The psyche of the Russia people still echoes with the wounds of the Great Patriotic War, in which at least 20 million Soviets died. For every German killed fighting the USSR, 10 Soviets were killed. Visiting a place like St. Petersburg — besieged Leningrad during the war — “you can feel it,” said Burns.But once the “40-somethings” in Russia are in charge, and memories of the hot war and the Cold War fade, things will change, said Allison. “They understand the [challenges] of the 21st century are transnational, and that climate change is the metaphor.”The Lives of the Great Patriotic War exhibition runs from October 23-November 26, 2014 in Pusey Library, Monday-Friday, 9am-5pm. No Harvard ID is required. This portrait of a March 1945 command inspection of an observation station in Breslau shows Jewish soldier Dimitry Shore (far left). Picturing the Great Patriotic War Soviet Jewish veterans in more recent times. Reading “On the Way to the Patriotic War,” this postcard shows happy soldiers of all ages on the march. Artists V. Ninogradov and Y. Nikolaevlast_img read more

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Thierry Henry Emerges as Surprise Candidate for Barca Job

first_imgThierry Henry has reportedly emerged as a surprise candidate to become the next Barcelona manager if Ernesto Valverde leaves the club.The former Barcelona forward took charge of MLS side Montreal Impact on an initial two-year deal in November.But Henry has now been linked to becoming boss at the Nou Camp if current manager Valverde departs, according to Spanish outlet Sport. Valverde’s contract at the Catalan giants is set to expire in June, although there is the option to renew it for another year.Henry’s coaching career began just three years ago as Roberto Martinez’s assistant at the Belgium national team and he lasted just 104 days in his first managerial role at Monaco.However his lack of experience does not reportedly concern Barcelona as he knows ‘the Barca way’ having played for them for three years.Henry is also good friends with his former Barcelona and France team-mate Eric Abidal, who is Barcelona’s director of football.Barcelona are currently at the summit of LaLiga, two points ahead of rivals Real Madrid.Share this:FacebookRedditTwitterPrintPinterestEmailWhatsAppSkypeLinkedInTumblrPocketTelegramlast_img read more

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Syracuse Crunch headed to AHL Eastern Conference semifinal

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ The Syracuse Crunch is headed to the Eastern Conference semifinals of the American Hockey League playoffs. The Crunch, the local affiliate of the NHL’s Tampa Bay Lightning, wrapped up an impressive season 45-27-3 before sweeping the Portland Pirates 3-0 in the quarterfinals.Now, Syracuse awaits its second-round opponent. On Friday, the Crunch will either hit the road for a matchup with the second-seeded Springfield Falcons or host the fifth-seeded Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Penguins. Should Syracuse draw the Penguins advance, the game would take place in Crunch’s home arena: the War Memorial at The Oncenter on 800 S. State St.The Crunch is the sixth AHL team to play in Syracuse and the first since the Syracuse Firebirds did so in 1980. Before that, the last hockey-related event to take place in the city was the filming of “Slap Shot” in 1977.The team that now calls the War Memorial home bounced around before landing in Syracuse. The Crunch began as the Hamilton Canucks in 1992, representing the Vancouver Canucks. Two years later, the Canucks moved to Central New York and were renamed the Crunch by a public vote. The Crunch remained loyal to Vancouver, British Columbia, until 2000, when it became the Columbus Blue Jackets’ affiliate.After representing the Blue Jackets for 10 years, Syracuse switched to the Anaheim Ducks for two years before finally settling on the Lightning this season — a season coincided with great success. The Syracuse Crunch won its second division title this year, with the first coming in 2001-02.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textTickets for semifinal home games range from $19-$23 and can be purchased at the Crunch Box Office at the War Memorial or by calling (315) 473-4444.Potential playoff schedulesThe outcome of the Providence Bruins-Hershey Bears game on Wednesday will determine who and when the Crunch plays in the best-of-seven Eastern Conference semifinal. Here are the two possible scenarios:(Syracuse-Springfield) If Providence defeats Hershey on Wednesday:Game 1 – Friday, May 10 – Syracuse at Springfield, 7 p.m.Game 2 – Saturday, May 11 – Syracuse at Springfield, 7 p.m.Game 3 – Wednesday, May 15 – Springfield at Syracuse, 7 p.m.Game 4 – Friday, May 17 – Springfield at Syracuse, 7 p.m.*Game 5 – Saturday, May 18 – Springfield at Syracuse, 7 p.m.*Game 6 – Tuesday, May 21 – Syracuse at Springfield, 7 p.m.*Game 7 – Wednesday, May 22 – Syracuse at Springfield, 7 p.m.(Syracuse-Wilkes-Barre/Scranton) If Hershey defeats Providence on Wednesday:Game 1 – Friday, May 10 – Wilkes-Barre/Scranton at Syracuse, 7 p.m.Game 2 – Saturday, May 11 – Wilkes-Barre/Scranton at Syracuse, 7 p.m.Game 3 – Wednesday, May 15 – Syracuse at Wilkes-Barre/Scranton, 7:05 p.m.Game 4 – Friday, May 17 – Syracuse at Wilkes-Barre/Scranton, 7:05 p.m.*Game 5 – Saturday, May 18 – Wilkes-Barre/Scranton at Syracuse, 7:00 p.m.*Game 6 – Monday, May 20 – Syracuse at Wilkes-Barre/Scranton, 7:05 p.m.*Game 7 – Wednesday, May 22 – Wilkes-Barre/Scranton at Syracuse, 7 p.m.*if necessary— Compiled by staff writer, Danny Cuneo, [email protected] Comments Published on May 9, 2013 at 12:23 amcenter_img Related Stories Syracuse Chiefs season in full swinglast_img read more

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Broward County Lifts Curfew Following George Floyd Protests

first_imgBroward officials announced Wednesday afternoon that they are lifting the countywide curfew, although they warn it could be reinstated if there are any threats of civil unrest.The county has been under a curfew order from 9 p.m. to 6 a.m. since last Sunday, when afternoon protests in Fort Lauderdale became chaotic amid tension between law enforcement and demonstrators.County Administrator Bertha Henry terminated the curfew order on Wednesday afternoon. The curfew could be reimposed, officials add, with as little as one-hour notice “if there is evidence of possible civil unrest that threatens the health, safety, or welfare of the public.” Cities may still have their own curfews in place. For that reason, the county asks residents to check with their municipality.Protests in Broward County since Sunday night have remained mostly peaceful, as residents take place in nationwide demonstrations against racial inequality, following the death of George Floyd while in police custody in Minneapolis.last_img read more

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2016 not the disaster some farmers were expecting in Ohio

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest In the middle of summer, farmers in DuPont Pioneer Account Manager Micah Herron’s territory of Miami, Shelby, Auglaize and Darke Counties would have called what they were seeing in their corn and soybean fields a disaster. Now that harvest is complete, that tune has changed for that part of Ohio. Herron discusses the 2016 season with The Ohio Ag Net’s Ty Higgins in this week’s DuPont Pioneer Field Report.last_img

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Punjab police team attacked in Haryana

first_imgA Punjab police team carrying out a raid in neighbouring Haryana on Wednesday came under attack from locals, leaving several members of the unit injured. A villager also died after he was hit by a bullet in the melee. Reacting to the development, the Haryana police said it happened owing to procedural lapses on the part of their Punjab counterparts.Team rescuedA team of Bathinda police had gone to Desu Jodha village in Sirsa district in Haryana to arrest a person allegedly involved in drug trafficking. It had to be rescued by the Haryana police after being attacked by villagers.An official spokesperson of Haryana Police said the vehicle the Bathinda police team arrived in was also torched by the villagers. “In self-defence, the police team fired in the air. The villagers fired gunshots at the police — several personnel as well as villagers sustained injuries. A head constable who sustained serious injuries has been admitted at a hospital in Bathinda,” said the spokesperson.Investigation onWhile the spokesperson said the Haryana police are investigating the matter, he added that the Bathinda team should have, in accordance with standard operating procedure, informed the local police before conducting the raid. “No such information was given to the Sirsa police in this case, which shows a procedural lapse on the part of Bathinda police,” said the spokesperson.last_img read more

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