Ethics committee approves Rep Hughes legislation to provide more oversight of veterans

first_img26May Ethics committee approves Rep. Hughes legislation to provide more oversight of veteran’s health care Rep. Holly Hughes testified today in support of her legislation, House Bill 5639, which would require the Michigan Veterans Affairs Agency or Department of Military and Veterans Affairs report to the House and Senate four times a year on a myriad of issues pertaining to the care of our veterans living in the state’s veterans homes.“One of our most important responsibilities as legislators is to provide a check and balance on the other branches of government,” Rep. Hughes, R-Montague, said to the House Committee on Oversight and Ethics.  “This bill will ensure that the Legislature has a more direct oversight role into the care of our state’s heroes.  Problems at the Grand Rapids Home for Veterans go back two decades. Although we are hearing that things are getting much better under the leadership of Michigan Veterans Affairs Director James Redford and Michigan Veterans Health System CEO Leslie Shanlian, we want to make sure that those improvements continue and that any new concerns can be immediately addressed by the Legislature.”Specifically, House Bill 5639 requires the state veterans agencies to detail information on staffing levels, number of patient complaints and responses, distribution of pharmaceutical drugs, how patient funds are allocated and number of resident deaths to House and Senate committees no later than Jan. 1, April 1, July 1 and Oct. 1 of each year.Currently, the state has facilities in Grand Rapids and Marquette, but HB 5639 allows for reporting at any future buildings, as well.Committee Chair Ed McBroom, R-Vulcan, called for a vote on HB 5639, emphasizing “we’ve had substantial hearings on this subject and there’s no need to belabor this anymore.”The committee approved the legislation by a 6-0 vote and it advances to the full House for consideration. Categories: Hughes News,Newslast_img read more

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Within the next 10 years recommendationbased prog

first_imgWithin the next 10 years recommendation-based program guides will ultimately drive 75% of all TV viewing, according to The Diffusion Group (TDG).The research firm’s ‘The Recommendation Revolution – The Future of Recommendation-Driven Guides, 2016-2025’ report said that recommendation-driven guides will flourish in the coming decade, with the usefulness of the grid guide diminishing as TV Everywhere becomes more popular.TDG also said that paid recommendations will grow, giving multichannel video programming distributors (MPVDs) a valuable additional revenue stream and networks a new way to promote their programming.“The old-school grid guide no longer works for today’s viewer. By introducing a recommendation-based program guide, MVPDs can bring their interfaces in line with those of SVoD services like Netflix,” said TDG senior analyst, Alan Wolk.“Close to half of all TV viewing now occurs on a time-shifted basis rendering live network schedules increasingly immaterial. Operators must move beyond the grid and create an interface that reflects today’s viewing behaviour.”“Recommendation-based guides will deliver a vastly improved and personalised customer experience, which in turn improves subscriber satisfaction and retention, allowing viewers to better navigate the flood of content now available from linear, VOD, DVR, and streaming to find the shows they want to watch.”last_img read more

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CHILD ABUSE INQUIRY YOUNG GIRLS IN DERRY HOMES FO

first_imgCHILD ABUSE INQUIRY: YOUNG GIRLS IN DERRY HOMES FORCED TO WORK IN LAUNDRIES, SAYS SHOCKING REPORT was last modified: January 20th, 2017 by John2John2 Tags: His inquiry team found that in regard to the Good Shepherd Sisters facilities in Derry, the retired judge said there had been “unacceptable practices” of young girls being forced to do industrial work in the laundries.At other homes across the North of Ireland, young boys and girls were either sexually or physically assaulted by those charged with looking after them.Derry-born Dr Eamon Martin, the leader of the Catholic Church in Ireland, says the publication of the HIA report here “reminds us that much work remains to be undertaken in this regard.”The Archbishop is due to meet Pope Francis today and is expected to make reference to the HIA findings in his speech. The former Good Shepherd Convent in DerryTHE long awaited inquiry report into Historical Institutional Abuse (HIA) across the North of Ireland was published today.And it makes for shocking reading about the Catholic Church, the British State and health professionals who failed to protect vulnerable young people in their care from the 1922 through to the 1990s, leaving them mentally scarred for the rest of their lives.The inquiry was chaired by retired High Court Judge Sir Anthony Hart. Speaking at a press conference today at which he published the HIA’s 2,300 page report, Sir Anthony Hart said: “The largest number of complaints to the HIA related to four homes of the Sisters of Nazareth religious order.“In each of the four homes some nuns engaged in physical and emotional abuse against children.“Emotional abuse was widespread in all homes.”Sir Anthony Hart also found that a disinfectant was used used in baths.He said there was a significant number of cases of sexual abuse involving both priests and lay staff.HIA inquiry panel: (left to right) David Lane, Sir Anthony Hart and Geraldine CormackMany of these incidents were known to members of the clergy who did nothing to stop them.A total of 493 engaged with the inquiry team from across Ireland, England, Wales, Scotland and Australia making complaints against 65 institutions.center_img ShareTweet CHILD ABUSE INQUIRY: YOUNG GIRLS IN DERRY HOMES FORCED TO WORK IN LAUNDRIESGOOD SHEPHERD CONVENTSAYS SHOCKING REPORTSIR ANTHONY HARTlast_img read more

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