Pacific Oaks College Welcomes Lifelong Educators as New Board Members

first_img Community News faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,PCC – EducationVirtual Schools PasadenaDarrell Done EducationHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyCitizen Service CenterPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes Priscilla Burgess Gamb (l) and Renata Cooper (r). Photo courtesy Pacific Oaks CollegePacific Oaks College and Children’s School (PO) announces the appointment of two new members to the Board of Trustees, Renatta Cooper and Priscilla Burgess Gamb. Cooper and Gamb are longstanding community members of PO and the community is honored to welcome appointees so deeply involved with the institution.“Our Board of Trustees connects Pacific Oaks College & Children’s School with the best thinking about our future and the best practices to assure that we achieve it. All of our Board members bring wisdom and experience to our community. The leadership that Renatta Cooper and Priscilla Gamb bring is also shaped by a long-standing commitment to our mission and our community. We are so grateful that they continue to care about Pacific Oaks and trust that we will make great strides together,” said Dr. Patricia A. Breen, president of Pacific Oaks College & Children’s School.Renatta Cooper’s commitment to PO spans over 25 years and began when she was a student, where she earned a Masters degree in Human Development, with a specialization in Multicultural Studies at the college. At PO, she helped develop the Hixon Institute for Early Childhood Education, served as a faculty member for the Human Development department and as a teacher at the Children’s School, where she created the Saturday Infant/Toddler program.A proud alumna of PO, Cooper is known as a leader in the field of early childhood education. She was a member of the Board of Education for Pasadena Unified School District (PUSD) and tirelessly served for 8 years. During her Board of Education tenure, Cooper focused on promoting early childhood education, fostering stronger engagement between parents and the community, and closing the achievement gap between diverse groups of students and English learners.Priscilla Burgess Gamb’s lifelong relationship with PO harkens back to the university’s roots. Gamb’s mother, Evangeline Burgess, served as the first president of Pacific Oaks College. Gamb attended Pacific Oaks Children’s School when she was a child, as did her own son and daughter. She would go on to fulfill administrative and teaching roles at the Children’s School. Additionally, Gamb has previously served on the Board of Trustees for PO, including her involvement with the Pacific Oaks Preservation Organization Advisory Council since 2009.Gamb’s extensive experience in education includes 19 years of teaching and administration at the elementary school level, as well as significant advisory roles with local organizations such as the Junior League of Pasadena, PUSD, Pasadena City College Child Development Center, and Pasadena Community Foundation.About Pacific Oaks College & Children’s SchoolFounded more than 70 years ago by a small group of Quaker families, Pacific Oaks College & Children’s School (PO) is a non-profit, accredited higher education institution offering Bachelor’s-completion and Master’s programs in human development, organizational leadership and change, marriage and family therapy, education, early childhood education, and teacher credentialing. Pacific Oaks Children’s School provides early childhood education programs for children ages 6 months through 5 years and has pioneered achievements in the areas of anti-bias education, emergent curriculum, and peaceful conflict resolution.PO remains dedicated to the fundamental Quaker principles of inclusion, social justice, and the valuing of each individual. The school has a long history of serving non-traditional and adult students and is known for its experiential and culture-centered approach to education. PO offers classes at its main campus in Pasadena, its San Jose Campus, and at instructional sites throughout California. PO is regionally accredited by the Western Association of Schools and Colleges Senior College and University Commission (WSCUC) and is a member of the Hispanic Association of Colleges & Universities (HACU). For more information, visit www.pacificoaks.edu.Pacific Oaks College is an affiliate of TCS Education System, a non-profit system of colleges advancing student success and community impact. Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadena Herbeauty9 Of The Best Family Friendly Dog BreedsHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyWant To Seriously Cut On Sugar? You Need To Know A Few TricksHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty10 Brutally Honest Reasons Why You’re Still SingleHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty6 Strong Female TV Characters Who Deserve To Have A SpinoffHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyYou Can’t Go Past Our Healthy Quick RecipesHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty15 Countries Where Men Have Difficulties Finding A WifeHerbeautyHerbeauty First Heatwave Expected Next Week Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m. Top of the News Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  Make a comment Subscribecenter_img Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday Business News More Cool Stuff Education Pacific Oaks College Welcomes Lifelong Educators as New Board Members From STAFF REPORTS Published on Thursday, December 1, 2016 | 1:43 pm 7 recommended0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it Community News EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *last_img read more

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Recent burglaries, home invasions plague off-campus students

first_imgOn Friday night, a burglar entered a student residence on N. St. Peter St. through an unsecured window. The burglar left with several laptops, iPods, game stations and cash. He or she also found car keys to a black SUV and drove away with the car, which belonged to one of the home’s residents. This robbery was the sixth to student residences in only four months. In those four months, there have also been two home invasions and four student robberies, according to reports from the South Bend Police Department (SBPD). In another recent case, a burglar forced an off-campus student to drive at gunpoint to different ATMs around the city and withdraw cash. The student said he was mugged twice before — once in Chicago and once on Napoleon St. near campus. “If there is anything that I take away from this robbery and previous muggings, it is that I need to stop being outside at like 4 a.m., which is roughly when each of these unfortunate incidents has occurred,” he said. The robber approached the student around 4 a.m. Sept. 27 at a Speedway gas station on the 2100 block of South Bend Avenue. He told the student he had a gun, and he forced the student to drive him to two different ATMs in downtown South Bend to withdraw cash, according to police reports. The student drove the man to several houses after he withdrew the money, police said. The student told police he was afraid to drive away each time the man got out of the car, but he eventually sped away from the robber when he walked far enough away from the vehicle. The student returned to his home and called police. Police arrested a suspect in the case, but he was later released. The Observer will not name the student because he was the victim of a crime. “I have lived off-campus now since mid-June, and while I never consciously feel unsafe, I recognize that I have to be more careful now than I have been the past three years,” he said. “As for my experience off-campus, my roommates and I are still trying to get a feel for how safe our neighborhood is. My roommate had a car window smashed about a month ago and had his iPod and XBox stolen … The people two houses away from us, all grad students, were sitting on their porch one day when two guys with guns made them go inside and give them their laptops.” Off-campus president Tess Fitzpatrick said these crimes demonstrate the need for more vigilance in students who live off campus. “One of the main issues has been during football games, people leave their doors unlocked or their windows unlocked, and it’s very accessible for people to come in,” Fitzpatrick said. “That’s usually the case for these robberies … You aren’t living on campus anymore. You can’t just leave your door unlocked.” Fitzpatrick said the SBPD has interacted more with students this year, trying to give them more tips about how to protect themselves and their property. “In your car, for instance, [they said] not to leave valuable objects out to be seen, so if you have a GPS, just hide it,” she said. “Get to know your neighbors too. That not only establishes a relationship, but they will look out for you when you are integrating yourself in the community.” Fitzpatrick sends “student watch” emails to the off-campus listserv with information about crime in the local area. Leaving the protection of campus can be an adjustment for many students, she said. “People don’t realize it’s such a transition moving off campus,” Fitzpatrick said. “In the campus community, stuff gets stolen sometimes but it’s a lot more student-community based, so they respond to one another more … Realize that you are not in a community of just students.” Fitzpatrick advised students to lock their doors at all times, even when one or more residents are in the home, and said using house alarm systems regularly is also important. “I think [these crimes are] a continuing trend, so this is something we’re trying to work on because we have been establishing a better relationship with the cops this year,” she said. “Now we are trying to focus on common sense safety things.” Sgt. Keri Kei Shibata is the crime prevention officer at Notre Dame, and she leads educational initiatives for both on- and off-campus students to help them learn about safety. “As for the crimes that students experience, I would say there has not been much of a change,” she said. “There have always been robberies and burglaries … most of them from unlocked doors or open windows.” Shibata said students need to take more initiative in their own safety educations. When planning to move off campus, students should make safety a priority in their housing search. “It can be a great thing but students need to understand that there is a lot more responsibility for one’s own safety when students live off campus that will require some inconveniences to make sure they are doing all the things they can to be safe,” Shibata said. She advised students to investigate the crime alerts and maps available through the off-campus website. “What I recommend is that when you have in mind a couple places that you are looking at … and you feel like this might be an organization you want to rent from, I would go to these crime maps and look through the maps for at least the last year and crime area that you are living,” Shibata also recommended checking the area during the day and at night to see what the environment has been like lately. “Safety has to be a priority, and building those good safety habits now will also be helpful down the road,” Shibata said.last_img read more

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Nations Cup double for England

first_img6 May 2014 Nations Cup double for England England internationals Annabel Dimmock, Gabriella Cowley and Alex Peters, completed a team double at the weekend with victory in the Nations Cup at the Welsh women’s open stroke play championship. They won the trophy by five shots over Scotland. The event was decided by the best two scores in each of the three rounds of the championship. The previous weekend Annabel and Gabriella won the Nations Cup for England at the Helen Holm Scottish open stroke play at Troon. Annabel (Wentworth, image © Leaderboard Photography) also came within a whisker of completing a remarkable personal double. After winning the Helen Holm, she challenged strongly for the Welsh title, eventually finishing on eight-under par and runner-up, by a shot, to Scotland’s Eilidh Briggs. English players were on impressive form throughout the championship, with six in the top ten. Following Annabel were Gemma Clews (Delamere Forest) and Emma Goddard (Royal Liverpool), who tied third on seven-under; Bethan Popel (Long Ashton) seventh on six-under; Gabriella Cowley (Hanbury Manor) eighth on five-under; and Meghan MacLaren (Wellingborough) who was among those tied ninth on four-under. Click here for the full scoreslast_img read more

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Sea Bright Council Holds First Reorganization Meeting at New Beachfront Pavilion

first_imgAsa symbol of united support for the town, state Sen. Declan O’Scanlon Jr. andmembers of Monmouth County’s Board of Chosen Freeholders presented Mayor DinaLong with a ceremonial county flag. Additional2019 appointments, unanimously made, included: The library will allow patrons to take a book out on the oceanfront deck. Photo by Patrick Olivero Longtimecouncilman William Keeler, a 30-year civil servant of the borough, became thefirst ever to be sworn in at the new pavilion by O’Scanlon. Councilman MarcLeckstein was sworn in by state Sen. Vin Gopal and Leckstein was chosen onceagain to serve as council president. BoroughAttorney: Roger McLaughlin, McLaughlin, Stauffer & Sharklee, P.C. “SeaBright is where people want to be,” said Leckstein. “As has become the sloganfor our new library, we see ‘Bright Things Ahead.’ ” BoroughPlanner: Christine Cofone, Cofone Consulting Group, LLC Theairy three-story building with large windows overlooking the ocean, designed tohouse the borough beach patrol, an oceanfront library and public bathrooms,represents a major step forward for a once storm-torn town. After Super Storm Sandy,the council promised to rebuild and return the coastal borough to its formerglory. “Now, six years later, that promise has been kept,” said Marc Leckstein,council president, in his year-end address. The Sea Bright Council’s new meeting room with ocean view. Photo by Patrick Olivero Althoughonly 1,400 residents strong, Sea Bright has experienced a rebirth in the pasttwo years with former mainstays such as Donovan’s Reef reopening and newconstruction projects finally being completed. This includes a new beachsidewalkway that begins outside the pavilion and continues down the coast toEdgewater Beach Club. Politicians, law enforcement and members of the public gathered for a solemn celebration at the Borough Council’s reorganization meeting, the first-ever meeting held at the top floor of the newly constructed Beachfront Pavilion and Library. BoroughAuditor: Robert W. Allison, Holman Frenia Allison, P.C. center_img SEABRIGHT – Despite the dreary weather, Saturday, Jan. 5, marked a shining momentfor the seaside town of Sea Bright. BoroughEngineer: Francis W. Mullan, T & M Associates Inher annual address, Long applauded efforts by the council for keeping the pavilionproject on track. “The final cost (of the project) will be within the amountapproved by the voters of Sea Bright in the referendum,” she announced, to muchapplause. Nowin her final year of a four-year term, the mayor reflected on achievements,shortcomings and renewed commitments for 2019. Long promised to push forinclusion and collegiality within local governance, with timely and reliableupdates to the public of what’s to come. By Vincent Ferrer BoroughSpecial/Conflicts Counsel: Porzio, Bromberg & Newman, Vito Gagliardi Jr. and Kerri A. Wright (educational matters) Constructionis currently underway on a sister building, the new municipal complex, locatedseveral hundred feet from the pavilion. The complex will house a firehouse and policestation. BoroughProsecutor: William G. McGuinn, Hoagland, Longo, Moran, Dunst, LLP PublicDefender: Robert J. Holden Bond Counsel: John Draikiwicz, Gibbons, P.C.last_img read more

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Ferndale scores 11 in first to cruise to NCS first-round win over Calistoga

first_imgFerndale >> In Wednesday’s North Coast Section Division VI first-round playoff game between visiting Calistoga High School and Ferndale the only similarity the two teams shared was their name.Featuring a roster filled with seniors that have made multiple playoff runs, fifth-seeded Ferndale Wildcats scored early and often en route to a 22-3 five-inning victory over the 12th-seeded Calistoga Wildcats, a much younger team with fewer playoff appearances.“It’s always important to have a little bit …last_img

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Cutting turbulence toll in half: here’s how it works

first_imgIt’s the stealthy hazard aloft, the one that goes bump in the night, the one that causes you to seize your seat’s armrest till the knuckles turn white.It’s turbulence—either the kind generated by storms or the less obvious, but rattling, Clear Air Turbulence (C.A.T). Either way, it costs airlines some US$100 million each year in injuries to passengers and crew as well as unscheduled maintenance, operational inefficiencies and money lost while aircraft are out of service.Recently, AirlineRatings.com revealed a breakthrough system that’s cut the toll exacted by turbulence in half among aircraft equipped with the system. Now we’ll tell you just how it works.At least five major international airlines—American, Alaska, United, Cathay Pacific and Cathay Dragon (formerly Dragonair)—have at least some of their jets fitted with the system developed by The Weather Company, an IBM Business. Partnering with Gogo Business Aviation, the set-up enables the delivery of real-time turbulence reports and alerts directly to pilots and airline dispatchers. The aim is to greatly improve an aircraft’s chances of avoiding moderate to severe turbulence.Traditionally, flight operations, pilots and aviation meteorologists have received coded verbal reports—reports containing limited information on actual, real-time flight conditions—via pilot reports, or PIREPS. Now, the Weather Company and Gogo contend their Turbulence Auto PIREP System (TAPS) can communicate critical en-route weather information far faster.To find out how TAPS fast tracks that information AirlineRatings.com talked to Mark D. Miller, senior vice president of aviation for The Weather Company. He says, so far, the system’s two launch customers, American and Alaska Airlines, have seen a “40 percent to 50 percent reductions in injuries and maintenance expenses” by better avoidance of bad air.Existing aircraft sensors that track angle of attack, altitude, airspeed, pitch, yaw, roll and other flight parameters feed that information into the ACMS—the Aircraft Condition Monitoring System. That’s where Miller says the data are encoded into his company’s proprietary algorithms.From there, the encoded data is –in most cases—sent to the aircraft’s ACARS system. The Aircraft Communications Addressing and Reporting System is a digital datalink for transmitting messages between aircraft and ground stations, often via satellite. “We transform that [data] into very specific operational guidance,” he says. Sometimes that’s a Significant Meteorological Information or SIGMET.Regardless the raw data is processed and Flight Plan Guidance is the product.  “Basically, for the next 24 hours the heads up “provides the pilot and the [airline dispatcher] a complete picture of where they can expect to find turbulence en-route,” says Miller. As for updates, “We have a very robust alerting back end” of the system, “that’s continually monitoring all these flights and your flight plan. If we see any new [turbulence] report or forecast that may affect the flight, we can alert that aircraft directly.”Flight Plans are important, but it’s immediacy that can often be the difference between broken bones and barely discernable light chop. Miller says the turn-time between the moment ACARS sends the turbulence message to the ground and the potentially-affected aircraft is warned ranges from ten seconds to a minute, “depending on the communications pathway. It happens very quickly,” asserts The Weather Company’s senior vice president for aviation—from initial turbulence detection, to report, to information received on the ground and distributed back out.In this case, speed saves—avoiding injuries and schedule-crippling unplanned maintenance. “In these situations, minutes can matter,” says Miller. Especially when a flying machine is moving along at four- to five-hundred miles per hour.It’s got to be noted that this is a private solution to a very public problem. The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration is in talks says Miller about “getting this data into some of their systems, and I think—over time—that will come.” “But,” he cautions “FAA does not make these kind of changes quickly and readily.”In contrast, airlines can move with comparative speed on their own. Not only are at least five carriers already flying many of their aircraft with the system on-board, Miller says The Weather Company is “in the final stages” of talks with a major European carrier.All told, so far, some 700 aircraft worldwide are fitted with the system.The Total Turbulence system is no mere pipe dream, no futuristic prediction. It’s here right now, and already making a difference. It appears just how deep a dent it puts in turbulence injuries and damaged airplanes depends on how fast the airlines adopt it.last_img read more

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An inclusive and responsive social protection system

first_imgNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT PLAN OUTCOME 13In 2030, South Africa is a working nation, individuals are engaged in meaningful activity, and vulnerable groups and citizens are protected from the worst effects of poverty. Everyone is able to live the life they wish to lead.   •  Overview•  Document downloads•  Quality basic education•  Health care for all•  Safety & freedom from fear•  Economy & employment•  A skilled workforce•  Economic infrastructure•  Vibrant rural communities•  Sustainable human settlements•  Accountable local government•  Natural environment•  South Africa in the world•  Efficient public service•  Inclusive social protection•  Nation building, social cohesion Social protection – DownloadsFind out more about the National Development Plan.• National Development Plan – full text• National Development Plan – Chapter 11: Social protection• Medium-Term Strategic Framework 2014 to 2019 – Outcome 13: An inclusive and responsive social protection system• Infographic: Social protectionSocial protection – The visionThe National Development Plan’s vision is that, in 2030, South Africa is a working nation, individuals are engaged in meaningful activity, and vulnerable groups and citizens are protected from the worst effects of poverty. Everyone is able to live the life they wish to lead.A social floor has been defined and a multi-pronged strategy recommended to ensure that no household lives below this floor. Problems such as poverty induced hunger, malnutrition and micronutrient deficiencies have been addressed.In 2030, an inclusive social protection system addresses all areas of vulnerability and is responsive to the needs, realities, conditions and livelihoods of those who are most at risk.By 2030:• No-one lives below a defined minimum social floor.• All children enjoy services and benefits aimed at facilitating access to nutrition, health care, education, social care and safety.• Hunger, malnutrition and micronutrient deficiencies that affect physical growth and cognitive development, especially among children, have been addressed.• The skills deficit in the social welfare sector has been overcome.• Income support to the unemployed is provided through various active labour market initiatives such as public works programmes, training and skills development, and other labour market related incentives.• All working individuals make adequate provision for retirement through mandated savings. The state provides measures to make pensions safe and sustainable.• Social protection systems have responded to the growth of temporary and part-time contracts, and increasing importance of self-employment. The systems have set up mechanisms to cover the risks associated with these.• An effective social welfare system delivers better results for vulnerable groups, with the state playing a larger role compared to now.• Civil society complements government initiatives.Social protection – The challengesOur social assistance system is well developed with wide reach and coverage, but the system is still fragmented, plagued by administrative bottlenecks and implementation inefficiencies.Demographic trends and human development indicators point to a country with significant levels of social fragmentation, unacceptable levels of social alienation and the breakdown of social institutions.Poor social welfare services and ineffective policing reinforce the sense of powerlessness in poor communities. The distribution of and access to both public and private social welfare services remains skewed along racial and income lines, with the wealthy having access to relatively effective private services.The demand for social welfare services and care is increasing. Those with the ability to pay for social welfare services and care privately have the advantage of better services, whereas government-funded services, the quality of service is often plagued by inefficiencies, inadequate funding, competition for scarce resources and inadequate monitoring and oversight of services delivered.One of the key issues is reaching all of those who are entitled to existing benefits of social assistance. The state continues to be accountable for high-quality and effective services that comply with policy and rules, and achieve specified outcomes and results.Social protection – Action requiredSouth Africa must develop a comprehensive social protection system that includes social security benefits such as retirement, unemployment, death and disability benefit and – where necessary – social assistance such as public employment.The concept of social protection includes community development and social welfare services – no-fee schools, health care services, housing, free basic services and subsidised public transport.This social protection system must be sustainable, developed with the demographics of the country – including the increasing life expectancy – in mind. For one, the youth of today must not become an older population reliant on social assistance.Specific action includes:• Together with social partners, determine a social floor that can be progressively realised through rising employment, higher earnings and social grants and other aspects of the social wage.• Increase the supply of four categories of social service professionals to 55 000, to respond to the demand for appropriate basic social welfare services, i.e. social workers, auxiliary or assistant social workers, community development workers, and child and youth care workers.• Identify the main elements of a comprehensive food security and nutrition strategy and launch a campaign.• Create incentives that encourage a culture of individual saving for risks and loss of income due to old age, illness, injury or loss of work for workers in both the formal and informal sectors.• Explore designs of a mixture of financing and institutional frameworks that enables those in the informal economy to participate in contributory social insurance schemes.• Pilot mechanisms and incentives to assist the unemployed to access the labour market.• Expand existing public employment initiatives to create opportunities for the unemployed.• Develop a consolidated institutional framework that supports coherent policy implementation, integrated social security administration, and effective regulation and oversight of the system.Social protection – Key medium-term goals for 2019South Africa’s Medium Term Strategic Framework (2014 to 2019) identifies the following sub-outcomes to achieve an inclusive and responsive social protection system.• Reforming the social welfare sector and services to deliver better results• Improving the provision of early childhood development. All children should enjoy services and benefits aimed at facilitating access to nutrition, health care, education, social care and safety (access and quality)• Deepening social assistance and extending the scope for social security• Strengthening community development interventions• Establishing social protection systems to strengthen coordination, integration, planning, monitoring and evaluation of services• Developing a sustainable model of funding social development• Increasing human resource capacity for the social welfare sector• Improving household food and nutrition.Social protection – Key medium-term targets for 2019South Africa’s Medium Term Strategic Framework (2014 to 2019) identifies the following targets to achieve an inclusive and responsive social protection system.GRAPHIC: MARY ALEXANDERResearched, edited and compiled by Mary AlexanderUpdated December 2015last_img read more

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2017 Ohio State Fair Jr. Dairy Show Results

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Here are results from the 2017 Ohio State Fair Jr. Dairy Show. Further results will be made available as the shows progress.HolsteinTotal animals shown: 115 Exhibitors: 58YRP Grand Champion Exhibitor: Kris Ackley Animal: Ms Brookview Scaredycat Sire: Butz-Butler Atwood BradyYRP Reserve Grand Champion Exhibitor: David Miley Animal: Miley Gold Chip Gazella-T Sire: Mr Chassity Gold ChipYRP Junior Champion Exhibitor: Marrisa Topp Animal: Toppglen Awesome Wildflower Sire: Luck-E Awesome-RedKris Ackley of East Liberty exhibited the Grand Champion Holstein Cow.YRP Reserve Junior Champion Exhibitor: Emily Deam Animal: OH-River-SYC-Soloman Sire: Walnutlawn Soloman-ETYRP Senior Champion Exhibitor: David Miley Animal: Miley Gold Chip Gazella DOB: 9/7/12YRP Reserve Senior Champion Exhibitor: Kris Ackley Animal: Craggan Goldwyn Zing (Aged Cow) DOB: 9/2/10Senior Showmanship (15 and over) 1. Logan Schlaugh 2. Brandon Sugg 3. Victoria Deam 4. Lindsey L’Amoreaux 5. 5.Ashley HawvermaleIntermediate Showmanship (12-14) 1. Olivia Finke 2. Cole Pond 3. Emily Deam 4. Garrett Havens 5. Hayden KingJunior Showmanship (11 and under) 1. Elaina Lahmers 2. Ava Bundy 3. Kelly Hawvermale 4. Lillian Finke 5. Madicyn RuppRed and WhiteTotal animals shown: 46YRP Grand Champion Exhibitor: Ally Cupps Animal: Pine-Tree Rebel Sire: Air-OSA-MLE Malone-RedYRP Reserve Grand Champion Exhibitor: Cora Gunkelman Animal: Miss-Hotcakes-Red-ET Sire: Willsboro Larson-ETYRP Junior Champion Exhibitor: Korey Oechsle Animal: Jacher Amini Riptide-Red Sire: Mr Aples Armani-ETYRP Reserve Junior Champion Exhibitor: Amelia Sammetinger Animal: St Jacobs Ad Luchesse Sire: Addiction-PSenior Showmanship (15 and over) 1. Ashley HawvermaleIntermediate Showmanship (12-14) 1. Maggie MatthewsJunior Showmanship (11 and under) 1. Kelly HawvermaleAyshireTotal animals shown: 49 Exhibitors: 31YRP Grand Champion Exhibitor: Lane Greiwe Animal: Mill Valley Burdette Crystal Sire: Palmyra Tri-Star Burdette-EYRP Reserve Grand Champion Exhibitor: Kenton Topp Animal: ToppView Bendig WannaB Sire: Palmyra Jerry Bendig ETYRP Junior Champion Exhibitor: Ashley Hawvermale Animal: Old-Bankston JC Banner Sire: Palmyra Berkely ReaganYRP Reserve Junior Champion Exhibitor: Lane Greiwe Animal: Mill Valley Tuxedo Mandy DOB: 9/18/16YRP Senior Champion Exhibitor: Lane Greiwe Animal: Mill Valley Burdette Crystal DOB: 3/15/13YRP Reserve Senior Champion Exhibitor: Keaton Topp Animal: ToppView Bendig WannaB DOB: 12/2/14Senior Showmanship (15 and over) 1. Keaton Topp 2. Ashley Hawvermale 3. Kinley Topp 4. Marissa Topp 5. Lane GreiweIntermediate Showmanship (12-14) 1. Carson Wyatt 2. Blake Greiwe 3. Sara Steck 4. Hailey Ramhert 5. Logan ToppJunior Showmanship (11 and under) 1. Kelly Hawvermale 2. Annie Rawn 3. Levi Rehmert 4. Kale Hamker 5. Julie Headings Milking ShorthornTotal animals shown: 36 Total exhibitors: 16YRP Grand Champion Exhibitor: Somer Reid Animal: Honey Creek Juvi Dot DOB: 3/29/14YRP Reserve Grand Champion Exhibitor: Aubree Topp Animal: ToppView Liriano-EXP Sire: 4/4/14Senior Showmanship (15 and over) 1. Sarah Rhoades 2. Emmy Days 3. Gina Climer 4. Sam Rhoades 5. Alex WeissIntermediate Showmanship (12-14) 1. Maggie Weiss 2. Henry Specht 3. Lilyin Specht 4. Rance Quillin 5. Katie WeissJunior Showmanship (11 and under) 1. Aubree Topp 2. Charlie Weisslast_img read more

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Punjab police team attacked in Haryana

first_imgA Punjab police team carrying out a raid in neighbouring Haryana on Wednesday came under attack from locals, leaving several members of the unit injured. A villager also died after he was hit by a bullet in the melee. Reacting to the development, the Haryana police said it happened owing to procedural lapses on the part of their Punjab counterparts.Team rescuedA team of Bathinda police had gone to Desu Jodha village in Sirsa district in Haryana to arrest a person allegedly involved in drug trafficking. It had to be rescued by the Haryana police after being attacked by villagers.An official spokesperson of Haryana Police said the vehicle the Bathinda police team arrived in was also torched by the villagers. “In self-defence, the police team fired in the air. The villagers fired gunshots at the police — several personnel as well as villagers sustained injuries. A head constable who sustained serious injuries has been admitted at a hospital in Bathinda,” said the spokesperson.Investigation onWhile the spokesperson said the Haryana police are investigating the matter, he added that the Bathinda team should have, in accordance with standard operating procedure, informed the local police before conducting the raid. “No such information was given to the Sirsa police in this case, which shows a procedural lapse on the part of Bathinda police,” said the spokesperson.last_img read more

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