Marbella House / PAARQ Arquitectos

first_imgMarbella House / PAARQ ArquitectosSave this projectSaveMarbella House / PAARQ Arquitectos Year:  Architects: PAARQ Arquitectos Area Area of this architecture project Lead Architect: Houses Patricio Araya Rodriguez Chile Marbella House / PAARQ Arquitectos ArchDaily ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/916648/marbella-house-paarq-arquitectos Clipboard “COPY” “COPY” ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/916648/marbella-house-paarq-arquitectos Clipboard 2018 CopyHouses•Maitencillo, Chile Area:  375 m² Year Completion year of this architecture project Manufacturers: AutoDesk, Sherwin-Williams, Dellorto, Dynal, MK, SIP, Trimble Photographs Save this picture!© Paula Monroy+ 25Curated by Clara Ott Share Client:Miguel Angel OlivaEngineering:Pablo RomeroLandscaping:PAARQ ArquitectosCollaborators:PAARQ ArquitectosCity:MaitencilloCountry:ChileMore SpecsLess SpecsSave this picture!© Paula MonroyRecommended ProductsAcousticSchöckStaircase Insulation – Tronsole®DoorsVEKADoors – VEKAMOTION 82DoorsStudcoAccess Panels – AccessDorWoodLunawoodThermowood FacadesText description provided by the architects. Casa Marbella is conceived with the purpose of encapsulating the wide view in 180 degrees towards the sea and the hill. The commission was to create an open space program with the ability to host the daily life of a large family.Save this picture!© Paula MonroySave this picture!SectionSave this picture!© Paula MonroyFraming the view and the site in was one of the important points, we had to come up with a volume that would comply with the building regulations, so the design was essential for the approval of the project. The spaces for private use at underground level (51% of the volume is in contact with the ground) and a volume of reinforced concrete where the rooms are located, overlooking a garden and the endless pool, allow light and natural ventilation.Save this picture!© Paula MonroySave this picture!PlanSave this picture!© Paula MonroyAscending to the first floor, we find the main staircase (point of intersection of the volumes), the horizontality of the stone surface that reaches the main access with an important height of 3.00 gives way to living room and kitchen, separated by a chimney that differentiates both areas. The kitchen, an important part of the project, given the owner’s passion for the culinary art, frames the best view towards a large terrace contemplating the landscape and the sunset in all its extension.Save this picture!© Paula MonroyProject gallerySee allShow lessStefano Boeri Architetti Designs New Offset Housing in AlbaniaArchitecture News7 Wonders of the Ancient World Brought Back to LifeArticles Share Photographs:  Paula Monroy Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project Projects CopyAbout this officePAARQ ArquitectosOfficeFollow#TagsProjectsBuilt ProjectsSelected ProjectsResidential ArchitectureHousesMaitencilloChilePublished on May 08, 2019Cite: “Marbella House / PAARQ Arquitectos” [Casa Marbella / PAARQ Arquitectos] 08 May 2019. ArchDaily. Accessed 11 Jun 2021. ISSN 0719-8884Browse the CatalogPanels / Prefabricated AssembliesTechnowoodPanel Façade SystemRailing / BalustradesMitrexIntegrated Photovoltaic Railing – BIPV RailingMetal PanelsAurubisCopper Alloy: Nordic BrassHanging LampsVibiaHanging Lamp – VOLConcreteKrytonCrystalline Waterproofing – KIMSkylightsLAMILUXGlass Skylight FE PassivhausPorcelain StonewareCosentinoSurfaces – Dekton® Chromica CollectionBricksFeldhaus KlinkerThin Bricks – ClassicGlassDip-TechDigital Ceramic Printing for Interior DesignWoodStructureCraftEngineering – FootbridgesAluminium CompositesCymat Technologies Ltd.Bundang Doosan Tower – Alusion™ Stabilized Aluminum FoamTable LampsRoss GardamDesk Lamp – OraMore products »Save世界上最受欢迎的建筑网站现已推出你的母语版本!想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?是否翻译成中文现有为你所在地区特制的网站?想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?Take me there »✖You’ve started following your first account!Did you know?You’ll now receive updates based on what you follow! Personalize your stream and start following your favorite authors, offices and users.Go to my streamlast_img read more

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Volunteers pack an impressive advocacy punch

first_img continue reading » Often, the credit union delegations Ryan Donovan hosted during his days as a congressional staffer consisted entirely of directors.“That was really cool because then you knew you were talking to folks in the community,” he says. “It drove home the point that credit unions have a strong connection to the district.”That experience explains why, in his present-day role as CUNA’s chief advocacy officer, Donovan gets energized by the prospect of growing board members’ role in credit unions’ advocacy efforts at the national, state, and local levels.“Volunteers can be a very important voice for us,” says Donovan, who will present CUNA’s 2018 advocacy agenda at the upcoming CUNA Volunteer Conference. “One of the advantages of credit unions’ structure is that volunteers come from the membership, and the membership comes from the community. So you’ve got real people representing credit unions in advocacy—as opposed to banks, whose shareholders might not have anything to do with community.” 12SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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NCUA bans former CEO and financial services officer

first_img continue reading » ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr An ex-president/CEO and a former financial services officer were banned from participating in the affairs of any federal insured financial institution, the NCUA said Tuesday.Tobisha Bullock, who worked as president/CEO at the $2.3 million Caano Employees Federal Credit Union in Kenner, La. from at least 2012 to the end of the first quarter of 2018, allegedly submitted an application for a loan to herself that contained false or incomplete information, according to the independent federal agency.She also allegedly made unauthorized payments to herself, including payments for health insurance that exceeded the approved amount and payments for vacation time in excess of the time she had accrued, the NCUA prohibition order shows.The total amount of the unauthorized payments and loan was not furnished in the prohibition document.last_img read more

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LIRR Derailment: Work Train Impeded Passenger’s Train Space, Officials Say

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York The morning after a frightening crash that caused a Long Island Rail Road train carrying 600 passengers to derail Saturday evening, officials took a moment to breathe a sigh of relief that most people escaped without any serious injuries. “When you look at the actual damage to this situation, this silver lining is we’re fortunate that more people weren’t seriously hurt,” Gov. Andrew Cuomo said Sunday morning after surveying the wreckage. “The damage to the train cars is extensive and we have had a number of injuries, but frankly, that we didn’t lose any lives is something to be thankful for.” In total, 33 people were injured, 26 of whom were passengers, officials said. Four of the injuries were classified as serious. One passenger suffered broken bones and was forced to undergo surgery. Although the crash is currently under investigation, officials were able to shed more clarity on the crash, which occurred just after 9 p.m. in New Hyde Park. Cuomo said the passenger train and a work train were running in the same direction when they sideswiped each other, causing three of the passenger train’s cars to careen off the tracks. The passenger train “was where it was supposed to be,” officials said, adding that the work train appeared to have intruded on the other train’s path. MTA Chairman Thomas F. Prendergast said the work train was being used for maintenance on an inoperable track.“One of the last steps is that piece of equipment going back and forth and I think they had completed and they were going to make a move east with all of the work equipment and clear up,” he said. “Why it ended up where it did…that’s what we need to find out in the investigation.”The work of ascertaining how it came to be that the work train apparently impeded the passenger train will be left to the National Transportation Safety Board, the agency responsible for investigating transportation-related incidents. Crews work to clean up site of LIRR derailment on Saturday, Oct. 8, 2016 in New Hyde Park. (Photo credit: New York Governor’s office)Cuomo urged everyone to exercise caution and let investigators examine the crash site before drawing any conclusions. “Once we have the facts from NTSB, anything the LIRR can learn from the incident, we will learn,” the governor said. Cuomo was effusive in his praise for first responders considering they were working under darkness and were at a disadvantage because the track was sitting on a steep hill. He said crews will focus on removing the debris and the damaged trains with the hope of getting the train back in service. With Monday being Columbus Day, the railroad is expecting lighter ridership, which could help relieve the stress of the painstaking work ahead, officials acknowledged. Cuomo said additional state resources have been ordered to assist the LIRR. “If we have to work all day and all night long, we will because we want to make sure tomorrow’s commute is as normal and as easy as possible,” Cuomo said.Service remained suspended on the LIRR’s Oyster Bay branch due to the crash. The railroad released the following instructions to customers using its service:Huntington/Port Jefferson BranchPort Jefferson – Hicksville CustomersThe LIRR has established limited alternate service to/from stations Hicksville through Port Jefferson with a diesel shuttle train that will operate between Hicksville and Babylon, then train transfers at Hicksville to/from Huntington and points east.Westbound customers will take a westbound train to Hicksville. There, they will board a diesel train to Babylon, which will travel along the ‘Central Branch.’ At Babylon, transfer to a westbound train to New York.Eastbound customers should take an eastbound train to Babylon. There, they will board a diesel train to Hicksville, which will travel along the ‘Central Branch.’ At Hicksville, transfer to an eastbound train to Huntington and points east.To avoid delays, customers are advised to use the Montauk or Babylon BranchesWestbury – New Hyde Park CustomersThe LIRR is providing limited bus service between Jamaica and the New Hyde Park, Merillon Avenue, Mineola, Carle Place & Westbury Stations.Westbound customers will take a westbound bus to Jamaica, then transfer to trains for service to points west.Eastbound customers should take an eastbound train to Jamaica. There, they transfer to a bus for service to New Hyde Park, Merillon Ave., Mineola, Carle Place & Westbury.To avoid busing and delays, customers are advised to use the Hempstead Branch. (Featured photo credit: New York Governor’s office)last_img read more

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Anderson Cooper helps Rick Santorum by stopping him before he says too many racist things in a row

first_imgAt this point Anderson Cooper cuts in to stop Ricky from further embarrassing CNN, bringing up that there are lots of reasons people are boarding up their businesses and big burly white guys with guns and a lack of civic sense is very possibly one of them, saying “The caravans of armed trump folks driving around in big trucks blocking traffic? That is not a concern?” Santorum reiterates that he didn’t think you would have to worry about that in New York City. Quick reminder: Three days ago MAGA “caravans” blocked traffic on the New Jersey Parkway and the Mario Cuomo Bridge.Another thing that the CNN crew forgot to mention: There have been numerous incidents of murder and violence perpetrated by dunderheads who freak out when they are told to wear masks in places of business. The trepidation many Americans feel surrounding Trump clearly losing this election is warranted.After being reminded of that, Santorum retreats somewhat sheepishly into a “I guess, at least we, from our perspective we don’t—“ at which point Cooper asks, “As a white Republican you’re not scared about white, armed, Trump supporters looting around cities they don’t live in?” Santorum says no, and Cooper points out that Trump seems to love it, especially in places where white militia cowards and gun enthusiasts have been arrested for threatening to kidnap elected officials because they don’t like fucking wearing masks to protect themselves and others during a goddamn pandemic!- Advertisement – As the CNN panel, which included Van Jones, pointed out that the MAGA Trump heads are getting dangerously frothed up by their death cult commander in chief, Santorum had this to say: “They boarded up businesses in New York City, not to keep Donald Trump supporters from looting, okay?” Van Jones attempted to point out that Joe Biden isn’t stoking the very justifiable rage against law enforcement and Donald Trump that Americans could very well have right now. Santorum is not to be dissuaded from expressing his racism for the day.Campaign ActionRICK SANTORUM: Where is the real threat here? I don’t see any people storming around burning buildings and crashing thru—- Advertisement – – Advertisement –last_img read more

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Buncrana beauty queen waltzes onto Dancing with the Stars

first_imgBuncrana nurse and model Grainne Gallanagh will be strutting her way to the dancefloor in next year’s Dancing with the Stars Ireland.The former Miss Universe Ireland winner confirmed her place on the celebrity line-up this morning, admitting that the nerves are already hitting before her big TV moment.Grainne (25) is a qualified nurse who had a whirlwind year as Miss Universe Ireland 2018. She placed in the Top 20 of the pageant final in Bangkok and became Ireland’s first model to walk in Miami Swim Week 2019. She may have the catwalk moves, but Grainne admits that she has zero dance moves!Grainne Gallanagh – Dancing with the Stars Ireland 2020“Unfortunately I do not have any experience or any natural talents,” Grainne said.The women’s health advocate is very excited for her new challenge as she plans to juggle her work and rehearsals.“You have to make time for the things that you are passionate about,” she told RTE host James Patrice, before showing off her signature move – the Dad Dance. Dancing with the Stars rehearsals kicked off in Dublin this week as the contestants get ready to hit the dancefloor in January. Other stars confirmed so far include Glenda Gilson, Lottie Ryan, Mary Kennedy, Sinead O’Carroll and Ryan Andrews.  Buncrana beauty queen waltzes onto Dancing with the Stars was last modified: December 5th, 2019 by Rachel McLaughlinShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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Adams plans return after two-year ban

first_imgHeavyweight Ali Adams plans to return to the ring next month following a two-year ban for an anti-doping offence.The Chelsea-based Iraqi, 32, was suspended after testing positive for stanozolol, an anabolic steroid, after his fourth-round stoppage defeat against Audley Harrison in May 2012.He has reapplied for a license from the British Boxing Board of Control and has re-signed with manager Steve Goodwin.Adams said: “I am delighted to be back. I made a genuine mistake and paid the price. That is now behind me and I want to move on.“I class Steve as a friend. He kept in contact with me throughout my ban and gave me support.“I will keep active and build up towards titles. It is time for the talking to stop and for me to do my stuff in the ring and I am so hungry now to put things right.”The defeat to Harrison was the fourth loss of Adams’ 18-fight career and took his record to 13-4-1.See also:Harrison destroys Adams on ring returnAdams tests positive for banned substanceFollow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

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Africa is transforming beyond recognition

first_imgSpeech delivered Wednesday, 1 August 2012 at the Africa Risk Conference at the JSE.Ladies and gentleman – why are we all here at the JSE discussing Africa and the issue of Risk?I believe it because we are optimistic about Africa but aware of its complexity. The continent is transforming beyond recognition – and for the better.The challenge for Africa – is how to make the last decade’s improvements in governance, peace, stability and economic growth sustainable.But let us also first acknowledge that there are many real risks and issues facing Africa and its investors. There is a need for caution when generalising about the complexity of 54 independent states.Recently Brand South Africa commissioned a study of companies invested in South Africa, which found that the top obstacles to further investment for local and international companies were issues like: crime, corruption, inefficient bureaucracy, labour regulations and skills levels. These issues are exhaustively explored each day in the South African media.Likewise Ernst & Young’s 2012 Africa Attractiveness Survey identified political instability, corruption and security as the major risks associated with African investment.This is well illustrated by the upheavals in North Africa – which it must be said were largely unpredicted by the ‘risk industry’. Today the Arab Spring still continues to dominate North Africa and the Middle East, severely effecting investment and growth. According to The Financial Times’ 2012 FDI report, which measures only new investment projects or significant expansions of existing projects, for 2011 there was a 29% decline in FDI projects into Egypt and a 14% fall in Tunisia.That said, despite the political upheaval in North Africa, as a whole, Africa remained a so-called hotspot with a 24% increase in recorded FDI projects in 2011.This has been the trend for the last five years right through the global financial crisis. Drawing on the fDi intelligence data up to February 2012, Ernst & Young found that the number of FDI projects in Africa have grown at a compound rate of close to 20% since 2007.Here I am glad to report that South Africa was the best performing country in the Africa in 2011 recording a 57% increase in project numbers and an 87% growth in capital investment.Brand South Africa CEO, Miller Matola, at Africa Risk 2012But what does this tell us about risk and why investors are choosing Africa?To recap: the various continental scourges are well known. Political infighting, weak institutions, poverty, poor infrastructure and trade regulations, graft, lack of skills…. one really can construct and exhaustive list of woes which beset many countries on the continent.The risks are definitely there, so it must be the potential rewards which are attracting unprecedented and sustained investment growth.Despite the economic upheaval in global markets, Africa is the world’s 2nd fast growing region and delivers the highest returns on FDI in the world. But it is also a confusing continent of 54 nations each with their own risk profile, internal and regional dynamics. This makes accurately identifying, weighting, contextualising and pricing these risks – and of course the rewards – a truly daunting task. In fact Deloitte’s Africa Risk Map about which I am sure we will hear more later has created a service precisely to provide insight into this very complexity.There are many reasons why the many risks I’ve already mentioned seem to be outweighed by the huge potential rewards, but let me list some of them.The commodities super-cycle has served African growth well. It is a prime source of the vital resources which are sustaining emerging economies in Asia and elsewhere. The massive new investments in extractive industries from energy to minerals is well documented. And, as food security rises up the international agenda so too will the demand for arable land. By some estimates 60% of the world’s available unexploited cropland lies in sub-Saharan Africa.But what about the people?Africa is young, increasingly wealthy and urbanising. By 2050 about 60% of Africans will live in cities – cities which will need infrastructure to be financed and built; and which will become concentrated markets for consumer products and services.According to UN, Africa will have a population of about 2 billion by 2050. At present the median age is 19.7 compared to 32 for BRIC nations and 40.1 for Europe. These figures describe the millions of workers and middle class consumers who are already creating economies of scale and becoming the growth markets of the future. The rise of mobile telephony, the internet, and increasingly wide access to financial services are both driving and demonstrating that the Africa of today and tomorrow is very different from that of the 1970’s, 80’s and 90’s.While we must celebrate the greater democracy, peace and stability there is no credible risk model that will not be conscious of how difficult it is to predict or quantify political risk or economic contagion.What we do know is that perceptions of risk vary dramatically depending on who you speak to; and where you stand.This is why I am representing Brand South Africa and speaking to you here today.Brand South Africa, which is the new name of the old International Marketing Council of South Africa, has as its mandate: “to build South Africa’s nation brand reputationin order to improve South Africa’s global competitiveness.” This mandate reflects a greater focus on driving international investment and trade.Let us be clear. Every country, or region has a “brand” – a way in which the country is perceived. If it has a reputation as a safe or profitable investment destination this reputation will improve its competitiveness – leading to further investment and a virtuous cycle of trade, development, stability and economic growth.This is what we as Brand South Africa try to do for South Africa. As such we are acutely aware, as you will be too, that perceptions of risk, as with anything else are not based on uncontested facts or immutable laws.The questions I ask of you, is whether we need to question our perceptions and understanding of risk when considering Africa?Put differently – should we recalibrate the way we view risk when considering Africa?Why do I say this? Investment risk models require a blend of subjective judgements and objective data inputs. But for some countries the quality of the objective data is far stronger than for others. South Africa’s excellent auditing and reporting standards – rated no.1 in the world by the World Economic Forum – mean that we have a high degree of comfort that our data is assured, peer reviewed and can be relied upon. In fact I suspect you would feel more comfortable trusting the financial statements of many South African listed entities than for instance some of the European banks…But this level of assurance is not the same in all African markets. The appraisal and weighting of risk – being less informed by rich sources of assured data – becomes far more reliant on perceptions, in-market intelligence and other more subjective decisions.And what informs these more subjective decisions?Subjective perceptions will be influenced by prejudices – by which I mean pre-judgements both positively OR negatively.The more you know about a country or region; the more you have a feel for it; the more you understand its political and business culture – the more context you have and the more likely you are to make fair and informed subjective judgements. Language, cultural affinity, experience, insider access, personal history all play a crucial role.Clearly there is a very strong experiential aspect which informs our subjective judgements.Common sense? Absolutely.But there are also authoritative research which backs this up in the African context. According to Ernst & Young’s 2012 Africa Attractiveness Survey – executives already doing business in Africa are overwhelmingly positive and rank Africa’s relative attractiveness above every other region except Asia – which only just pushes us into second place. But executives with no business presence in Africa were overwhelmingly negative –citing risk factors such as political instability, corruption and security as major obstacles.Now, you and I, and the well-resourced international company executives who form these judgments all have access to the same sort of statistics, media and professional analysts’ research reports. In fact if the truth be told we are drowning in information.So we can only conclude that the differentiator when making a judgement on Africa is not so much the objective data – but rather experiential factors. It is the subjective knowledge of doing business in Africa that must account for the radical difference in perceptions about Africa Risk.For South African business, indeed for all businesses and even African governments this has profound implications.It is in everyone’s interest to have the most accurate and realistic view of African and South African risk. Reliable risk appraisals will of course not only decrease the chance of bad investments but will also reduce the expensive risk premiums that attach to African investments and debt. In effect – more reliable risk assessments will improve our national and continental competitiveness.So what can we do to generate more informed risk assessments and drive investment in Africa?When asked what Africa should do to change its attractiveness executives speak about political stability, curbing corruption, improving the ease of doing business, better local access to finance and several factors relating to more coherent regional integration, such as one-stop border posts and tax harmonization.I am glad to say this is precisely the direction events are takingThat companies already invested in Africa can make very good returns; and that the prognosis for the future is good, is largely known to us here today. But to cement these gains, to attract the capital, trade, technology and the business relationships needed to continue and enhance Africa’s growth we need to also speak to those who are not yet ‘converted’ to the African growth story.So we must become activist in telling our story. After ten years or more, awareness of the ‘African growth story” of rising incomes, growing GDPs, expanding consumer markets, increased regional integration, improved governance, development and greater stability, is starting to spread.South Africa believes that no country in Africa can reach its full potential by working in isolation. This is as true of our collective political and economic destiny as it is of our efforts to explain ourselves as countries and regions to each other, and to market Africa as an investment and trade destination to the world.As South Africans we are learning that our greatest strength on the world stage, indeed our greatest competitive advantage and most exciting opportunities for sustained growth and development, lie in our being in, and part of, Africa.This is why South Africa champions what is known as an ‘African Agenda’ – a raft of policy proposals which support sustainable and diversified economic growth, development, security, deepening regional and continental integration, unity and increased international influence for the continent as a whole.We are proud to be amongst the 26 African countries which signed an agreement in June last year to create a free trade area that covers more than half of Africa. We hope that by June 2014, nearly 60% of the economy of Africa with a combined GDP of $1trillion and encompassing 600 million people will be a single free trade area, covering the Southern, Eastern and Central Africa.Ultimately we hope to achieve the African Union’s plan for a Continental Free Trade Area which will create a virtuous cycle of economies of scale, lowering the costs and risks of doing business, and maximising Africa’s competitive and comparative advantages.But non-tariff barriers to trade and investment also need to removed. These are the border facilities, regulations and procedures which inhabit efficient African trade routes; the lack of road, rail, port and other infrastructure that isolates vast swathes of the continent; and the poor economic diversification which restricts Africa to exporting commodities not creating our own industries.Already plans are in motion to achieve this in South Africa and across the continent.To drive development and attract local African and international investment and trade we need to encourage greater collaboration and cooperation in how we position ourselves.This is a collaboration not just between business and governments but also between African nations, and between their state, private and transnational institutions.Many of the best opportunities for attracting foreign direct investment and trade will lie in highlighting our regional competitive advantages – such as integrated markets and development corridors which may span many countries.For example to fully understand the risks and opportunities within the greater Ibadan-Lagos-Accra urban corridor will require a grasp of the risk and opportunities in Nigeria, Benin, Togo and Ghana. The potential of the East African Community will accrue to five countries – and investors need to understand them.Likewise, regional infrastructure projects like the North-South Road and Rail Corridor project, which is chaired by President Zuma, will unlock potential and change the dynamics of eight countries in eastern and southern Africa.This is not simply about upgrading road, rail, power and port facilities, as well as simplifying cross-border regulatory procedures, so that producers and traders can access regional and international markets more easily.To fully benefit from the raft of proposed and existing infrastructure projects linking African countries to each other and to international markets we need to promote our regional as well as national advantages.South Africa’s business and government are putting both effort and ‘money where their mouths are’ in Africa by developing mutually beneficial capacity and opportunities – particularly in relation to infrastructure and investment.Over the last decade South Africa has been the leading Foreign Direct Investor in Africa though it is now being joined by China and other developing nations. Our business sector has a strong track record of developing innovations suitable for African markets in areas such as:o Banking and financial serviceso Telecomso ICTo Constructiono Retail and miningTo encourage further growth and mitigate risks South Africa is orientating government policies, regulations and institutions to support African investment and integration. A few examples will serve to illustrate this:South Africa hopes to leverage our membership of BRICS to increase trade and investment into Africa and support the African Agenda.We are of course actively backing the African integration agenda while also investing hundreds of billions of dollars into infrastructure both in the region and in South Africa.Our relatively advanced infrastructure of roads, ports, rail and communication networks offers a trade link for the landlocked countries in southern Africa to the world and positions the country as a regional transhipment hub for sub-Saharan Africa to deliver on NEPADs regional integration agenda.In terms of investment it is not just our private sector which is investing heavily in Africa.Together with its partners in business and government South Africa hopes to build on the many successful examples of mutually beneficial regional cooperation such as joint maritime anti-piracy programmes, the Maputo Development Corridor, the Lesotho Highlands Water Project and the successful joint 1.5 billion dollar plus programme with eight other African countries (and Australia) to build the Square Kilometre Array – the world’s largest and most technologically advanced radio telescope.Recently, the Public Investment Corporation – which mainly manages government workers’ pensions and has over R1trillion in funds – has been authorised to invest about 10% of its funds internationally of which half – or about R50billion will be in Africa. Of this between 40%-60% (up to $3.8billion) will be earmarked for Private Equity.Likewise the IDC has expanded its remit to include African investment and will consider new or existing companies within Africa with funding needs from R1million to R1billion. The IDC’s Africa Strategic Business Unit has already established relationships with Development Finance Institutions and regional forums in 34 African countries.The JSE already offers a wide range of investment instruments focused on Africa outside of South Africa. The differentiation (for listing purposes) between African and non-African companies will end and the decision to offer a Depository Receipts (DRs) service to African companies will allow for greater exposure and diversification.These are just some of the policy and investment changes which are supporting African growth. But South Africa has many competitive advantages which it should use for our own and Africa’s benefit. Our strength in professional and financial services is widely recognised. While confidence in global financial markets is low – our financial market development was ranked in 4th place globally in the 2011/12 World Economic Forum’s (WEF) Global Competitiveness Index.We are rated number one for the regulation of the securities exchange and for the strength of our auditing and reporting standards. The WEF also rated us 2nd for both the soundness of banks and for the efficacy of corporate boards. South Africa is in 3rd position for the protection of minority shareholders’ interests and the availability of financial services and 4th for financing through the local equities market.This means that South Africa is well positioned to become a deal-making, financial and professional services hub for the entire region. Here we are not competing with our neighbours but with New York, London, Hong Kong and other international finance centres. Our existing nexus of excellent banking, legal, advisory, risk and other professional services, along with our continental experience and globally integrated capital markets should be utilized to provide access to capital for African businesses and support inward investment and trade.We should understand African risk better than anyone else. Our business has a long and distinguished track record on the continent. We are part and parcel of risk mitigation activities – whether this be peacekeeping and regional security, improving institutions and regulations or investing in infrastructure.As Africans we have an experiential advantage in interpreting African risk which should make up for deficiencies in the published data. Business, academics and government should be championing better and deeper knowledge of Africa not simply because we are well placed to do so, but because we are talking about ourselves.To summarise – we need more and deeper dialogue between countries, government, business, media and the public to dispel out-dated myths and to recalibrate how risk is seen in Africa.I believe this conference is one of many such forums in which we will do just that.last_img read more

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Bridge of love is locked down

first_imgJohannesburg’s lovers are locking their souls together on the bridge overlooking Emmarentia Dam. (Image: Sulaiman Philip)1Sulaiman PhilipEmmarentia Dam in Johannesburg is best known as the home of canoeing in the city of gold, and the Johannesburg Botanical Gardens on its banks.However, the bridge along the dam wall is slowly becoming the scene of a different love story. Over the last six months, padlocks have been discreetly attached to its railings. You notice them as you walk or drive over the bridge: one at first, a shiny brass lock; further on there is another, then another, clustered together close to the park entrance. Most are simply covered with a pair of initials, many in the bold scrawl of teenagers. The locks celebrate the earnestness of first love.The tradition of attaching locks to a bridge as testament of undying love has been around for quite some time – since before the Second World War at least – and now, it seems, the ritual has arrived in South Africa. If South African Antonys and Cleopatras follow tradition, they attach the lock to the bridge together before flinging the key into the waters below. This marks the unbreakable bond of their undying love.If the relationship sours or dies, tradition goes, you are meant to dive into the water to find the key. But the locks creeping across the bridge in Emmarentia celebrate transformational love, pulse-bursting, sweep-us-off-our-feet, turn-your-life-around love.Love struck Joburgers are clipping locks to the railings in a gesture of everlasting infatuation. (Image: Sulaiman Philip)This tradition may be new in the rainbow nation, but some residents have found a very South African way to use it. Morningside in Durban is a racially mixed community of middle class families. The president’s official residence in Durban, Dr John L Dube House, is in the leafy suburb of Edwardian and Victorian homes.In July 2013, to celebrate his birthday while he lay ailing in hospital, the people of Morningside began attaching locks to a fence to show their love for Nelson Mandela. Patrick Coetzee of the Dreambuilders Institute, the NGO that began the programme, explained at the time that it was an opportunity for people to “symbolically celebrate the positive difference Madiba has made to South Africa and the world”.Tradition startsIn Europe, the romantic tradition can be traced back to the town of Vrnjačka Banja in Serbia. The story goes that the Most Ljubavi Bridge, known as the Bridge of Love, was the meeting place for local school teacher, Nada, and her lover, a Serbian officer named Relja. When Relja went off to fight in Greece, Nada promised to wait for him. But he fell in love with a Greek woman, broke off his engagement and never returned to Serbia. Heartbroken, Nada died never having loved again.In her memory, the young women of Vrnjačka Banja began writing their names and the names of the men they loved on padlocks and attaching them to the railings of the Bridge of Love. The tradition was mostly confined to that bridge until Italian author Federico Moccia appropriated the tradition for his books Tre Metri Sopra il Cielo (Three Metres Above Heaven) and Ho Voglia di te (I Want You).In his home country, the most famous spot for lovers to bind love locks is along the path connecting the coastal towns of Manarola and Riomaggiore. The legend that has grown up is that the pathway was once the favourite meeting place for lovers from the towns. Today tourists flock to the area to place locks on the railings of the pedestrian bridge carved into the cliffs. They then toss the keys into the sea below. Over the last decade, the tradition has grown and love locks are now seen in cities across the globe. The superstitious say that the only way to break the love sealed by a padlock is to do to do so with a key (Image: Eurosplorin‘)The Yellow Mountains in China, the Chinese claim, is the birthplace of Love Locking. Here, the sea of clouds and romantic atmosphere of “China’s loveliest mountain”, Lotus Peak, has inspired poets and painters for centuries. A local legend tells of the beautiful daughter of a successful merchant who fell in love with a poor man. But she was to marry a man chosen by her father. On her wedding day, the young lovers fled and died together when they threw themselves off the mountain. The spot has been marked by memorials ever since, and today lovers attach padlocks to the railings on Lotus Peak and throw the keys off the mountain to celebrate their undying love.Love locksCouples looking to escape the noise and crowds of Seoul head to Mount Namsam, in South Korea, and have used the North Seoul Tower to swear eternal devotion. A sign in front of the thousands of locks reads: “A Promise for Endless Love ‘I Love You.’”Puntan dos Amantes (Two Lovers Point), in Tumon Bay on the Pacific Ocean island of Guam, is incredibly remote but it, too, has its legend of an ill-fated love that ended tragically on the cliffs. At the point where the forbidden lovers are said to have died there is a fence decorated with padlocks. You can even buy heart-shaped locks from vendors if you have forgotten to bring your own.Across the world, in Montevideo, Uruguay, the fountain on Avenida 18 de Julio has attracted lovers young and old. A plaque at the fountain reads: “The legend of this young fountain tells us that if a lock with the initials of two people in love is placed in it, they will return together to the fountain and their love will be forever locked.”In Paris, the city of love, where romance is part of the city’s very existence, the bridges over the Seine have become magnets to lovers eager to swear undying love. For Parisians, however, this ritual of the world’s Romeos and Juliets has become an annoyance rather than a celebration. The fussy French complain that the padlocks are ruining the architectural and aesthetic integrity of their bridges. And as a Parisian waiter told The New York Times in 2012: “The fools! They haven’t understood a thing about love, have they?”In his book In Praise of Love, contemporary French philosopher Alain Badiou reminds his audience that love is about constantly risking your heart. It is vulnerable and fragile. It is, as the French believe, about wishing your beloved freedom. And then you have the chance of retaining their endless love. “The idea that you can lock two people’s love once and for all, and toss the key, is a puerile fantasy.”But then, Badiou has spent his life trying to recreate his first love, the one on which he gave up. “I tried to recover that initial love, late, very late but with a unique intensity and feeling of necessity. There have been dramas and heart-wrenching and doubts, but I have never again abandoned a love.”last_img read more

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Landowner’s evidence not determinative in CAUV tax appeal according to Ohio Supreme Court

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Evin Bachelor, Law Fellow, Agricultural and Resource Law Program, Ohio State UniversityA landowner may present evidence regarding the value and acreage of his or her land, but the Board of Tax Appeals (BTA) is free to weigh that evidence as it wishes, according to the Ohio Supreme Court. All seven justices agreed that the BTA in the case of Johnson v. Clark County Board of Revision acted with appropriate discretion, although two justices did not sign onto the reasoning as to why the BTA acted appropriately. The case involved a property owner’s challenge of the Clark County Auditor’s determination of Current Agricultural Use Valuation (CAUV) for property tax purposes.Continue reading for more information about what CAUV is, how CAUV determinations and tax assessments can be appealed, what happened in the Johnson v. Clark County Board of Revision case, and the main takeaways from the Supreme Court’s decision. What is CAUV?CAUV permits owners of land devoted exclusively to agricultural uses to request that the county auditor assess property for tax purposes based upon the value of the land’s current agricultural use, rather than its true market value. Since its inception, CAUV has generally provided landowners with qualifying property a lower tax bill than they otherwise would have using market value. Ohio most recently changed the formula for CAUV in 2017. If CAUV land is converted to a use that no longer qualifies for CAUV treatment, the land is again assessed based upon its fair market value and the landowner must pay to the county the difference between the CAUV value and the fair market value for the prior three years. To learn more about CAUV, visit the Ohio Department of Taxation’s CAUV webpage here. How can a CAUV determination be appealed?First, if a landowner believes that all or part of his or her parcel qualifies for CAUV, an application must be submitted to the county auditor where the land is located. County auditors are the “chief assessing officers of their respective counties” and have the authority, within the guidelines of the state tax commissioner, to make the initial CAUV determination under Ohio Revised Code § 5715.01(B). Landowners should contact their county auditors about filing instructions.Second, the procedure to appeal whether land qualifies for CAUV is different than the procedure to appeal a tax valuation assessment. If a landowner does not agree with their county auditor’s determination as to whether or not land qualifies for CAUV, they have 30 days to file an appeal with their county court of common pleas under Ohio Revised Code § 929.02(A)(2). Decisions of courts of common pleas can be appealed to the state district court of appeals, and those decisions can be appealed to the Ohio Supreme Court.If a landowner does not agree with their county auditor’s valuation assessment, the landowner may file a complaint with their county Board of Revision. The forms for these complaints are generally available at the county auditor’s office or website.If a Board of Revision believes that the county auditor made an error in applying the CAUV statute and rules, the board has the authority to revise tax assessments. If the landowner still does not agree with the Board of Revision’s decision, he or she may appeal to the Ohio Board of Tax Appeals within thirty days of the Board of Revision’s decision under Ohio Revised Code § 5717.01. More information is available on the BTA’s website here. Alternatively, under Ohio Revised Code § 5717.05, the landowner may appeal the Board of Revision’s decision to the appropriate county court of common pleas.Decisions of the BTA can be appealed to the respective state district court of appeals where the land in question is located, and those decisions can be appealed to the Ohio Supreme Court. However, there are certain cases in which landowners can appeal decisions of the BTA directly to the Ohio Supreme Court under Ohio Revised Code § 5717.04. However, the types of appeals of a BTA decision eligible for direct appeal to the Ohio Supreme Court were reduced in September 2017 through House Bill 49. What happened in Johnson v. Clark County Board of Revision?Mr. Johnson challenged the Clark County Auditor’s 2013 tax assessment of his 154.61 acre farm. Neither party disagreed that the land qualified for CAUV, but Mr. Johnson disagreed with how much the Clark County Auditor said the farm was worth under the CAUV formula. For tax year 2013, the auditor assessed the property’s CAUV at $457,250.Mr. Johnson appealed to the Clark County Board of Revision. He testified, and also elicited testimony from an employee of the Clark County Soil and Water Conservation District and an employee of the Clark County Auditor’s office. Further, Mr. Johnson presented photographs, official records from the tax commissioner and auditor, and a “self-prepared written statement purporting to convey [the SWCD employee’s] site-visit findings.” The Board of Revision rejected Mr. Johnson’s claims.Mr. Johnson then appealed to the Ohio Board of Tax Appeals. Again, Mr. Johnson testified and produced a number of exhibits. At this appeal, he elicited testimony from an employee of the Ohio Department of Taxation. The BTA also rejected Mr. Johnson’s claims, finding that the Clark County Auditor had acted appropriately. Mr. Johnson then filed an appeal to the Ohio Supreme Court in 2016. Mr. Johnson represented himself pro se, or without an attorney. What are the main takeaways, and why did the landowner not succeed?First, the Ohio Supreme Court explained that a landowner challenging a Board of Revision or Auditor’s tax assessment must convince the BTA that his or her valuation assessment is correct and the one they are challenging is incorrect. This requirement to convince the Board of Tax Appeals is known as the burden of proof. The burden of proof determines which party must play an active role in proving his or her argument, while the opposing side will only have to present proof to counter if the board finds that the first party has carried its burden. Here, the court said that Mr. Johnson, as the landowner challenging the assessment, had the burden to convince the BTA. The court disagreed with Mr. Johnson’s argument that the county should have to rebut his evidence and prove the value that it assessed.Second, even though the BTA properly said that Mr. Johnson had the burden of proof, this does not mean that the BTA should have presumed the Board of Revision’s decision to have been correct. Instead, the BTA must independently analyze the evidence presented to it, and not simply defer to and accept the Board of Revision’s decision. Here, the Ohio Supreme Court found that the BTA did conduct an independent assessment in confirming the Board of Revision’s determination.Third, while an owner may present evidence as to the value of his or her land, a BTA has discretion to determine how much weight to give to that evidence. An owner’s opinion as to the value of his or her land is not determinative, but is merely a piece of evidence that the BTA may consider.Fourth, instead of looking at the acreage, the focus of the assessment should be on boundaries and a property’s uses within those boundaries. The Ohio Supreme Court explained the distinction between calculating acres and delineating boundaries by using dictionary definitions, and the distinction is essentially that a bounded area is fixed in space, while acreage alone describes an area without a specific line of demarcation. To prove that a parcel or portion of a parcel qualify for CAUV treatment, the boundaries of the qualifying land must be determined. Acres can only be determined after the boundaries are established. Here, Mr. Johnson did not prove the boundaries of CAUV areas on his land to the BTA’s satisfaction, and the Ohio Supreme Court said that it was within the BTA’s discretion to reject Mr. Johnson’s evidence.The Ohio Supreme Court’s full opinion, cited as 2018-Ohio-4390, is available here. Additional facts about the case can be found within the court’s opinion.Even writes for the Ohio Agricultural Law Blog.last_img read more

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