Kids, funding, and diversity accent McGrane’s year

first_img Kids, funding, and diversity accent McGrane’s year Jan Pudlow Associate Editor Dedicating his term as Florida Bar president “For the Children,” Miles McGrane challenged lawyers to take up the cause.“I am proud to say that you not only accepted this challenge, but you made this issue your own,” McGrane told those gathered at General Assembly in his state of the Bar address.Not only did lawyers contribute $45 to The Florida Bar Foundation to the Lawyers Challenge for Children in “unprecedented amounts” totaling more than $190,000, but the Board of Governors lent support by establishing a standing committee on the Legal Needs of Children to continue the work of the three-year commission chaired by 11th Circuit Judge Sandy Karlan.Lawyers lined up to represent a child pro bono. For those lawyers inexperienced on how best to represent a child in dependency court, the Public Interest Law Section teamed up with the Real Property, Probate and Trust Law Section to put on training programs, as did local bars across the state. Fifty-four lawyers who had never represented a child before agreed to do so.“Last year I told you about the Masai warriors’ greetings to one another. When the first warrior would ask, ‘And how are the children?’ the response, expected because of their society, was: ‘All the children are well.’“While we cannot say that, yet, I believe we can honestly say, ‘The children are doing a little better.’ There is much more to do, and I hope you continue to do so.”Calling court funding “the biggest issue facing the Bar this year,” McGrane reported: “I am happy to say that though the courts did not receive all that was requested, this matter resolved favorably and our trial courts, on July 1, will be able to serve the people of Florida just as they have in the past.”McGrane gave credit to Chief Justice Harry Lee Anstead for his “courageous leadership,” but warned, “This issue will not go away.”The Special Commission on Lawyer Regulation, chaired by Board of Governors members Hank Coxe and Henry Latimer, “turned out to be a much larger project than anticipated.”A survey sent to a cross-section of people who have participated in the grievance process over the past three years—complainants, respondents, respondents’ counsel, Bar counsel, referees, and grievance committee members—garnered more than 3,000 responses. The commission has divided into subcommittees to analyze the data.“Kelly Johnson and I have agreed to extend the life of this commission for another year, and it is now projected that the commission’s final report will be returned sometime next year,” McGrane said.A fourth key issue of his term as president was diversity in the legal profession.“In April, we held an unprecedented symposium where diversity in our profession was the sole topic,” McGrane said. Chaired by MaryAnne Lukacs, a diverse group of lawyers attended the day-and-a-half-long symposium held at St. Thomas University School of Law.“Most notable was the fact that almost all of the law schools in Florida sent representatives,” McGrane said.A report from the symposium will be used as a guideline for the Bar’s future planning.“A number of recommendations have already been adopted by the Bar, and the Bar’s future leadership has committed to a program of inclusion.”McGrane reported that the state of The Florida Bar is good; the budget is balanced; and dues remain stable.Ending with his signature salutation, McGrane said: “My friends, today is a great day to be a Florida lawyer. I am proud to be one. You should be, too.” July 15, 2004 Associate Editor Regular News Kids, funding, and diversity accent McGrane’s yearlast_img read more

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Nick Mellen to forgo 6th year of eligibility and leave SU

first_img Published on April 13, 2020 at 8:12 pm Contact Andrew: [email protected] | @CraneAndrew Two weeks after the NCAA voted to grant spring athletes an extra year of eligibility, Syracuse close defender Nick Mellen announced on Instagram that he won’t pursue a sixth year of eligibility.“It’s bitter/sweet the way this all ended,” Mellen’s post read. “You always want to be able to say you went out on top. As much as I would love to come back for a 6th year, I’ve decided to close this chapter of my life and figure out ‘what’s next.’”Mellen played in just one game during the 2020 season due to a left leg injury suffered in the season-opener against Colgate. The captain was close to returning when the season was canceled amid the coronavirus outbreak.During his five seasons with the Orange, Mellen started 46 of the 47 games he appeared in, forced 101 ground balls and caused 55 turnovers. He missed all of 2017 with an injury but returned and earned All-American honors during his redshirt sophomore and junior seasons.On March 30, the NCAA voted to grant relief to spring athletes whose seasons were cut short by the coronavirus. Syracuse, ranked No. 1 at the time, was powered by an offense led by seniors Jamie Trimboli and Stephen Rehfuss, and a defense that would have been headlined by a returning Mellen heading into Atlantic Coast Conference play. Instead, a combination of Brett Kennedy, Grant Murphy and Nick DiPietro — the three starters when Mellen was injured this year — will likely form the core of Syracuse’s defense in 2021.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text“You’ve got somebody that’s been your top cover guy for a number of years now, and that was always a comforting thing that Nick at most times could go out and take the other teams best attackmen out of the game,” Syracuse head coach John Desko said on Feb. 12. Comments Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

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