Chelsea Ladies pipped to WSL title

first_imgChelsea Ladies were pipped to the Women’s Super League title on goal difference by Liverpool as they suffered an agonising 2-1 defeat at Manchester City Ladies on a gripping final day of the season.Birmingham’s failure to beat Notts County meant a draw would have been good enough to secure a first major trophy in the team’s 22-year history.But first-half goals by Jill Scott and Toni Duggan put City in control and although Gilly Flaherty’s header gave Chelsea hope and the hosts had Abbie McManus sent off, a dominant Chelsea were unable to find the equaliser.Liverpool, who started the day in third, scored three second-half goals to beat Bristol Academy 3-0 and retain their title.Chelsea’s players were inconsolable after the game, but they have at least qualified for the Champions League for the first time in their history.The day started badly when goalkeeper Marie Hourihan had to be taken off when she damaged her shoulder after colliding with Georgia Brougham and falling awkwardly inside 10 minutes.And the change visibly affected Emma Hayes’ side.Hourihan’s replacement, debutant Claire Farrow, was almost beaten by Natasha Flint within a couple of minutes when she hesitated as she came off her line.Chelsea did almost go ahead when Rachel Williams had a header cleared off the line by McManus after great work by Eni Aluko on the left wing.But it was the hosts who deservedly went ahead, Farrow making a mess of an awkward bouncing shot by Scott.The visitors started to look shaky and Duggan’s stunning strike after a fine team move made it 2-0.Chelsea began to find their rhythm towards the end of the first half, but could not reduce the deficit going into the break.Aluko continued to be their best attacking player in the second period, consistently finding space and threatening to set up a goal.City had the clearest chance in the early stages, Flint heading wide with the goal gaping.But Chelsea were doing the majority of the pressing and always looked capable of finding a way back into the game and they did just that when Flaherty headed home from a corner.McManus then saw red for elbowing Yuki Ogimi with 14 minutes remaining, but Chelsea could not take advantage.Jackie Groenen blazed a glorious chance over the bar following another corner and Ogimi was denied in injury-time as City held on.Chelsea 4-2-3-1: Hoirihan (Farrow); Blundell, Bassett, Flaherty, Borges (Buet); Spence (Groenen), Chapman; Williams, Ji, Aluko; Ogimi.Subs not used: Wilhelmsson, Rafferty, Coombs, Meiwald.Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

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Mudstones Make Ripples

first_imgMost of the sediments in the world are mudstones – including shales and clays.  Until recently these were thought to form only in calm, placid seas.  Now, two geologists are continuing to show that they can form in flowing or turbulent water.    Two years ago, Schieber and Southard burst a paradigm by explaining how mudstones could form in flowing water (see 12/14/2007).  They’ve been experimenting ever since.  In flume experiments, they have found new ways to image what is going on in turbulent muddy water.  Their latest paper in Geology shows that mudstone particles can form ripples, just like sand.1  The particles clump into floccules several millimeters in size.  Even though smaller and lighter than sand, they behave like sand particles – climbing up slopes and avalanching down the lee sides, forming the familiar ripples kids see on the beach as the waves recede.  This happens even though floccules have slight attractions to each other via van der Waals forces.  They behave as if independent particles – just like sand grains.  The authors were also surprised to find that ripple formation occurs even when the mud is highly dilute: “this is remarkable when one considers that floccule ripples consist of as much as 90 vol% water.”    Why is this interesting?  After all, the authors acknowledged that geologists have been studying ripple formation for as long as they have been studying sediments.  “We might therefore think that the topic has been sufficiently exhausted to be of no further interest.”  Consider first how economically important mudstones are:Fine-grained sedimentary rocks (grain size <62.5>shales or mudstones, are the most abundant sedimentary rock type.  They contain the bulk of geologic history recorded in sedimentary rocks (Schieber, 1998), and are a key element in organic-matter burial, the global carbon cycle, and the hydraulic isolation of groundwater resources and waste materials.  Economically, they are an important source of hydrocarbons, minerals, and metals (Sethi and Schieber, 1998).  They are susceptible to weathering due to their clay content, and so often appear quite homogeneous to the casual observer.  Because of this, they are much more poorly understood than other types of sedimentary rocks, in spite of their importance.    An enduring notion about deposition of muds has been that they are deposited mainly in quiet environments that are only intermittently disturbed by weak current activity (e.g., Potter et al., 2005).  Flume experiments have shown, however, that muds can be transported and deposited at current velocities that would also transport and deposit sand (Schieber et al., 2007).  Deposition-prone floccules form over a wide range of experimental conditions, regardless of the exact parameters that drive flocculation in a given experimental run.  Floccule ripples, ranging in height from 2 to 20 mm, and spaced from centimeters to decimeters apart, migrate over the flume bottom and accrete into continuous mud beds at streamwise velocities from 0.1 to 0.26 m/s.The picture of tiny particles slowly settling to the bottom, producing uniform, homogeneous sediment layers, therefore, can no longer be defended.  Compaction after deposition can mask the turbulent and flowing conditions under which the beds formed.  This means that finely-laminated sediments may not represent cyclic deposition, but could form more quickly under turbulent or flowing conditions.  The authors discussed a paradox about the behavior of mudstone particles and floccules:There is an apparent paradox in mud sedimentation.  Whereas mud constituents are cohesive and flocculate, floccules made from cohesive particles appear to act noncohesively in transport.  Observation of floccule-ripple migration shows that erosion removes not simply single floccules, but also larger chunks of material.  Once moving, these chunks break up into smaller subunits that presumably reflect the maximum equilibrium floccule diameter for a given level of turbulence (Parthenaides, 1965).  Floccule-ripples migrate significantly slower than sand ripples under comparable conditions.  Thus, cohesive forces between floccules assert themselves once the floccules come to rest next to each other, but they are ineffective as long as the floccules move in turbulent suspension.OK, maybe you still couldn’t care less how mud particles settle on the bottoms of flumes, the ocean, or your bathtub.  Consider their ending statement: “Because mudstones were long thought to record low-energy conditions of offshore and deeper-water environments, our results suggest that published interpretations of ancient mudstone successions and derived paleoceanographic conditions are in need of reevaluation.”  I.e., here’s another example of “everything you know is wrong.”1.  Juergen Schieber and John B. Southard, “Bedload transport of mud by floccule ripples—Direct observation of ripple migration processes and their implications,” Geology, June 2009, v. 37, no. 6, p. 483-486, doi:10.1130/G25319A.1.Go back and read the earlier entry on this topic (see 12/14/2007).  Considering the vast quantities of sedimentary rocks around the world of this type (think major parts of the Grand Canyon), this really is big news.  A lot of geologic dating, fossil interpretation, and economic geology (e.g., oil shale interpretation) could be in for upsets.  The impact of reevaluating most of the geologic record in light of these findings cannot be ignored.(Visited 100 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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South African TV ‘white space’ trial goes live

first_img20 June 2014Microsoft on Wednesday launched the implementation phase of the second TV white space trial in South Africa, providing wireless broadband over a “white space” network to underserved communities in Limpopo province in a bid to validate the technology as a means of providing low-cost, high-speed internet connectivity in developing countries.Groundwork for the pilot project, which follows Google’s launch of a similar pilot among 10 schools in Cape Town last March, first started in July 2013.In both cases, the trials seek to demonstrate that broadband can be offered over white spaces – unused channels in the broadcast TV spectrum – without interfering with licensed spectrum holders, while offering an affordable means of democratising broadband internet access.The government has set itself the medium-term target of delivering broadband to 80 percent of South Africans by 2020.Microsoft is partnering on the project with the Department of Science and Technology, the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research, and local network builder and equipment vendor Multisource.The first beneficiaries of the project will be the University of Limpopo and five high schools within an 8-kilometre radius of the university.Speaking at a launch event at the university on Wednesday, Vice-Chancellor Mahlo Mokgalong said the project would help students at the schools and the university to become “true 21st century students and, eventually, valuable employees”.Microsoft South Africa MD Mteto Nyati said: “We need to enable our citizens to live, work and play on the global stage … Almost 60 percent of employees in a recent 21st century skills study said they developed most of the skills they use in their current jobs outside of school.”The Department of Science and Technology’s Isaac Maredi said the project would serve as a testing ground “for developing a nationally applicable model that will meet government’s goal of providing low-cost broadband access to the majority of South Africans by 2020, in line with the Cabinet-approved broadband policy and ICT vision, as set out in the National Development Plan.”The project is one of four TV white space trials that Microsoft is running in Africa. Last year, it launched trials in Kenya and Tanzania that combine white space technology with solar power to deliver high-speed internet access in areas not even connected to the national electricity grid. And earlier this year, it launched a similar trial in Ghana.The company also has trials under way or completed in the UK, Singapore and the Philippines.SAinfo reporterlast_img read more

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World Cup referees will not ‘lay down a marker’ with reds, says World Rugby

first_img Air of unpredictability hangs over the Cup with adaptability the key Read more Share on WhatsApp But Alain Rolland, World Rugby’s high performance manager for match officials, said the high-tackle framework had been pulled together in collaboration with coaches and that all decisions over red cards would be made on merit with mitigating factors, such as whether a tackled player ducked before being clobbered, taken into account.“I have made presentations to all 10 tier-one unions,” he said. “Chris Pollock and John Lacey have spoken to the tier-two countries. We have made it clear what the high-tackle framework is and how it will operate. It is there to protect the players. We are not here to lay down markers but officiate and adjudicate on actions. We will take the relevant action, as we have been doing since the end of May when there has been one red card in an international for a high tackle.”Meanwhile, match officials will have access to a more extensive version of Hawk-Eye’s Synchronised Multi-Angle Relay Technology (Smart) as part of a drive to speed up the decision-making process. The aim of the tournament organisers is that by the time a referee has watched a replay of an incident, the television match official is armed with advice.“We have made it quite clear to the TMOs that there either has to be serious foul play or there has been a clear action that has been missed in the act of scoring that has to be brought attention to the match officials, such as a forward pass or obstruction,” said Rolland.“We are working very hard to have the match officials on the field take the responsibility for making the majority of the decisions but there will be times when something is not seen but will be spotted by the TMO.” Topics Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Support The Guardian news Share via Email Share on Pinterest Share on LinkedIn Rugby union World Cup organisers have insisted officials will not be looking to “lay down a marker” over high tackles in the next seven weeks by flourishing red cards with abandon, as some players and coaches have feared.Following a new directive to reduce high tackles that was rolled out in May, the U20s world championship this summer produced a flurry of cards. Before flying to Japan the Wales captain, Alun Wyn Jones, raised concerns over the tackle laws overshadowing the tournament while England revealed on Sunday that Owen Farrell has tweaked his technique to avoid the possibility of sanction. Since you’re here… Share on Messenger The organisers are also keeping an eye on the weather. Yokohama, the venue for Sunday’s match between Ireland and Scotland, has been hit by heavy rain this week and a deluge is predicted for the day of the match. If the game has to be called off, it would not be rescheduled and put down as a draw.“A decision will be made in the main operation centre,” said Alan Gilpin, the tournament director. “A number of people will analyse information and we are in constant discussions with transport authorities and host cities. We will start the process 24 hours before a game and any decision would ultimately be taken by the executive director [Akira Shimazu] and me six to eight hours ahead of kick-off.”Ireland had to cancel a media event at their training ground on Monday because of the weather. “Two days ago I got scalded and now it is a bit like Galway with the rain,” said the outside-half Jack Carty. “It is windy and wet so I suppose it is as well we have had those conditions throughout the year.” Reuse this content World Rugby Rugby World Cup The Breakdown: sign up and get our weekly rugby union email. … we have a small favour to ask. More people are reading and supporting The Guardian’s independent, investigative journalism than ever before. And unlike many new organisations, we have chosen an approach that allows us to keep our journalism accessible to all, regardless of where they live or what they can afford. But we need your ongoing support to keep working as we do.The Guardian will engage with the most critical issues of our time – from the escalating climate catastrophe to widespread inequality to the influence of big tech on our lives. At a time when factual information is a necessity, we believe that each of us, around the world, deserves access to accurate reporting with integrity at its heart.Our editorial independence means we set our own agenda and voice our own opinions. Guardian journalism is free from commercial and political bias and not influenced by billionaire owners or shareholders. This means we can give a voice to those less heard, explore where others turn away, and rigorously challenge those in power.We need your support to keep delivering quality journalism, to maintain our openness and to protect our precious independence. Every reader contribution, big or small, is so valuable. Support The Guardian from as little as $1 – and it only takes a minute. Thank you. Rugby World Cup 2019last_img read more

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Private Sector Input Key in Economic Reform Programme

first_img Jamaica’s limited fiscal space does not allow the government to play “as great a role” as it would like in advancing growth Story Highlights This undertaking needs to be taken up by the local private sector It is the private sector that will, ultimately, facilitate increased productive activity Significant private sector inputs are pivotal to ensuring that Jamaica’s economic reform programme (ERP) and growth strategy are successfully implemented and advanced.This was the view advanced by Prime Minister, the Most Hon. Portia Simpson Miller and Finance and Planning Minister, Dr. the Hon. Peter Phillips, during  the first of two major ERP stakeholders’ conferences held on September 12, at the Jamaica Conference Centre, downtown Kingston.In her presentation, Mrs. Simpson Miller said Jamaica’s limited fiscal space does not allow the government to play “as great a role” as it would like in promoting and advancing growth.Consequently, she said, this undertaking needs to be taken up, to a significant degree, by the local private sector, “be they micro, small, medium, or large”, and through foreign direct investments (FDIs).“We (government) are committed to doing all we can to encourage both local and foreign investors alike…private sector investments. Making it easier to do business in Jamaica has to be (at) the forefront of government’s activities. Our task, once we have surveyed the present landscape, not just locally, but equally important, in the world economy, is to develop and implement programmes and projects to break us out of the cycle of successive adjustment programmes and to bring about  real economic growth,” the Prime Minister said.In his remarks, Dr. Phillips said while the administration has been able to maintain tight expenditure, thus far for the 2013/14 fiscal year, it is the private sector that will, ultimately, facilitate increased productive activity.“The role of the state is to create this environment (for production)…first of all, by not becoming the main borrower in our domestic financial markets and, therefore, allowing for interest rates to trend down and remain down, so that resources will be available for the private  investor. We have done this, so far, and I daresay we will continue to do this. We shall not be re-entering, as a substantial borrower of credit, in the domestic markets,” Dr. Phillips stated.Thursday’s conference, held under the theme: ‘Jamaica’s Economic Programme – Going for Growth, Staying the Course’, is the first of two scheduled to provide updates on the ERP being implemented as a condition of the US$932.3 million four-year Extended Fund Facility (EFF), which the administration negotiated with the International Monetary Fund (IMF).The conference was attended by a wide cross section of representatives from private and public sector agencies and entities, and community organisations, in parishes spanning the counties of Middlesex and Surrey.A similar forum is scheduled for parishes in western Jamaica, on a date to be scheduled.last_img read more

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Toronto producer J Miles Dale on his Oscar win – and spoiled

first_img“The Shape of Water” had a leading 13 Oscar nominations heading into the show and won four golden statuettes. Its other wins included best production design for Canadians Paul Austerberry, Jeffrey A. Melvin and Shane Vieau. “I’ve been there working for more than half a decade continuously and we wanted to show the talent … and make it something where you don’t use a rebate and escape, you know, you go to use the talent, you go to have the artistry.”By Victoria Ahearn | The Canadian Press “That’s OK. Guillermo said most of it and someone thanked everybody — I know how they run out of time. I get it,” Dale, 57, said in a phone interview with The Canadian Press after the show ended. Facebook “We’re very proud of the Canadian talent,” Dale said. It was the first Oscar win for Dale, who also worked with del Toro on the 2013 film “Mama” and the horror drama series “The Strain.” Dale won the Oscar on Sunday for producing “The Shape of Water” along with director Guillermo del Toro. Meanwhile, del Toro won best director and Alexandre Desplat won best original score. Toronto producer J. Miles Dale says he feels “ecstatic” about his best picture Oscar win and harbours no ill feelings after his speech was spoiled by play-off music. Dale was able to squeeze in some praise for del Toro after host Jimmy Kimmel approached him and asked what he wanted to say. After del Toro spoke onstage, Dale tried to say a few words but was drowned out by music and it seemed his moment was over, along with the entire show. “Thirty years ago when the business just started up there, the people up there began to learn from the best in the world and now they are some of the best in the world. So we were committed to using those people all across the board on the film and we think it’s a great moment for Canadian filmmaking.” The film was shot in Hamilton and Toronto and had a largely Canadian crew. “I’m ecstatic, euphoric, we’re incredibly happy and proud and surprised and shocked off our feet,” Dale said. Advertisement Del Toro echoed his thoughts backstage. Sally Hawkins stars in the film as a mute janitor in Baltimore who falls in love with an amphibian creature, played by Doug Jones, during the Cold War. LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Login/Register With: Advertisement Advertisement “I’ve said it to everybody that needs to hear it from me, so the other 220 million people don’t matter.” His other credits include the films “Scott Pilgrim vs. the World” and “Harold & Kumar Go to White Castle,” and TV’s “Shadowhunters: The Mortal Instruments.” Backstage after the show, he said it felt like “a watershed moment” for the Toronto film industry. Twitterlast_img read more

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Coleman admits Everton is weak

first_imgThe team’s right-back defender knows that only one win in the last four competitive matches is not good for his club.Everton lost 3-1 against Wolverhampton Wanderers in yesterday’s English Premier League fixture.The team went down a couple of spots in the table and is now in the ninth position with just 33 points in 25 matches.The Blues have only nine wins in 25 matches, six draws and ten losses.They have scored 36 goals and received 36 goals.And for Irish footballer and team captain Seamus Coleman, his team is weak right now and has not been playing well.“It’s a massive disappointment for us,” he said to the team’s official website after his side lost 3-1 against Wolverhampton Wanderers.“We should be performing better, especially at home in front of our fans.”“We came off the back of a good result against Huddersfield, and I think that’s been the problem this season.“We can’t seem to get a run of games going,” he added.Tammy Abraham, ChelseaChelsea hat-trick hero Tammy Abraham hopes for more Andrew Smyth – September 14, 2019 Tammy Abraham hopes this season will be his big breakthrough at Chelsea after firing his first hat-trick for the club in Saturday’s 5-2 win at Wolves.“It was a tough goal to concede at the time [of the match],” he said about Raul Jimenez’ late goal.“It always makes it more difficult going into the second half,but we were still going out there for the second half hoping to put a bit more pressure on them, and it wasn’t the case.”“We’re fully responsible, the 11 lads on the pitch, and not many of us were good enough today,” he commented.“Jonjoe [Kenny] was prepared to come in, he came in, and I thought he did well.”“I think probably enough of us can’t say that we did the same and that’s the biggest disappointment today,” Coleman concluded.Everton February’s matches will take the team against Manchester City, then Watford, and after a big rest a visit to Cardiff City.FT. Defeat at Goodison. #EFCmatchday pic.twitter.com/6Bxh7Nwszv— Everton (@Everton) February 2, 2019last_img read more

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