Third of directors would not re-hire current staff

first_imgMorethan a third of HR directors are unhappy with the quality of their employees,according to research.TheNational Human Resources Directors Survey 2000 reveals that 35 per cent of HRdirectors would re-hire less than 50 per cent of their employees if they couldchange all their staff. However,25 per cent of HR directors would recruit 75 to 100 per cent of theirworkforce, an improvement on last year. MargotKatz, general manager of recruitment and training consultancy DDI, whichcarried out the survey, said the figures reflect the tight labour market andthe skills shortage, particularly in IT.Shesaid, “People say that hiring the right people is so important, but at the sametime employers are under huge pressure to take people on to fill a job, andthen quickly discover they have employed the wrong person.”Thesurvey of 80 leading organisations in the UK also shows that 97 per cent ofrespondents identified connecting HR’s relevance to core business issues as oneof the main opportunities for the profession over the next five years.Asimilar proportion highlights the growth of HR’s internal consulting role asbeing equally important.Thestudy shows that 88 per cent of HR directors think hiring the right people isthe most important issue for employers, followed closely by motivating andretaining the right people at 86 per cent.DDIfound that average staff turnover had risen to 19 per cent in 2000, up 5 percent on 1999.www.ddiworld.comByBen Willmott Third of directors would not re-hire current staffOn 3 Apr 2001 in Personnel Today Previous Article Next Article Related posts:No related photos. Comments are closed. last_img read more

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M&S wins right to push through cuts

first_imgRelated posts:No related photos. Previous Article Next Article M&S wins right to push through cutsOn 25 Sep 2001 in Personnel Today Comments are closed. A court decision in France will give employers more confidence makingredundancies across Europe. Marks & Spencer welcomed the ruling against three French unions lastweek that had challenged the legal validity of its European works council. Thecouncil will now administer staff consultation on the closures. Diane Anderson who is head of personnel for international retail at M&S,said, “We fully believe our European works council is valid – it’s beenrunning since 1995 – and we’re glad that a judge confirmed this. It provides animportant forum for our European staff.” M&S is now going ahead with plans to sell the 18 stores, which employed1,600 staff. Anderson said, “The HR team has been fully involved in our workscouncil and played a key role in discussions with staff. We’ve continued ourprocess of consultation through the whole period.” In the past, UK companies were reluctant to restructure because of thethreat of legal action involving complex labour laws on the Continent,explained European HR consultant Peter Reid. He believes the case will set aprecedent for other employers. Reid said, “It’s extremely good news because it finally clears up theissue of what constitutes a valid agreement. The fact that a French court hasvalidated the M&S works council will be key.” He added, “It finally confirms that just because consultation law inEurope is tough it doesn’t make it impossible. Companies can restructure aslong as they follow correct procedures.” A further case later this year will decide whether M&S announced orproposed the store closures and whether it consulted staff properly underFrench law. Three store managers could face a custodial sentence or fines up toFFr25,000 (£2,404) if found guilty. By Ross Wigham last_img read more

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British Navy Warships to Support Opening of Tynwald

first_img View post tag: Navy Back to overview,Home naval-today British Navy Warships to Support Opening of Tynwald View post tag: Type 23 View post tag: Tynwald View post tag: Defence View post tag: Countermeasures Royal Navy warships HMS Somerset and HMS Brocklesby will be visiting the Isle of Man from Thursday, July 4, in support of the opening of Tynwald.HMS Somerset, a 4900-tonne, Type 23 frigate will anchor in Douglas Bay on Thursday, July 4 for a three-day visit before returning to sea on Saturday. Although not open to visitors, she will be hosting a variety of visits by small groups from local societies, while her Commanding Officer, Commander Mike Smith, will host a reception and capability demonstration for invited guests and dignitaries.HMS Brocklesby is Hunt-class mine countermeasures vessel (MCMV) and will be alongside at No.2 berth on Victoria Pier in Douglas from Thursday until Monday.She will be open to visit, from 11am until 5pm on July 5, 6 and 7th.This offers the Isle of Man public a unique opportunity to go aboard and learn more about the career opportunities in the Royal Navy, and get a glimpse of life on a warship.Members of the ship’s company from both vessels will be taking part in the formal opening of the Tynwald ceremony on Saturday, July 6 as will Commander Smith and his counterpart on Brocklesby, Lieutenant Commander Stuart Yates. He said: “We are very much looking forward to spending time in the Isle of Man and I hope as many local people as possible will come and see the ship for themselves during our open to visit hours.“It is a privilege to visit Douglas and an excellent opportunity to strengthen the ties between the Royal Navy at this historic maritime island.”Since returning from her last operational deployment in 2012, HMS Somerset has undergone an extensive upgrade to her weapons, sensors and machinery, making her even more capable.Having rejoined the active Fleet in March 2013 the ship and crew are now undertaking Operational Sea Training (OST). This will put the Type 23 frigate to the test in every situation that a modern warship, with global reach, can possibly be expected to deal with.Powerful and versatile with the capability to operate anywhere in the world, the Type 23 frigate is the mainstay of the modern surface fleet. The 13 Type 23 frigates form 50% of the total frigate/destroyer force in the Royal Navy.Originally designed for the principal task of anti-submarine warfare, they have evolved into multi-purpose ships with the capability to operate anywhere in the world.The present HMS Somerset is the fourth to bear the name and was built by Yarrow Shipbuilders Ltd in Glasgow. She was launched on 24 June 1994 on the Clyde by Lady Elspeth Layard, wife of the then Second Sea Lord Admiral Sir Michael Layard, and commissioned on 20 September 1996.HMS Brocklesby recently took part in the first Exercise Joint Warrior of 2013, a multi-national exercise held bi-annually in UK waters with allied nations and their armed forces, in company with HMS Hurworth, HMS Pembroke and HMS Grimsby.HMS Brocklesby is one of eight Hunt-class MCMVs based in Portsmouth. Built by Vosper Thornycroft from glass re-inforced plastic, she was launched in 1982 and commissioned 13 months later.The third ship to bear the name, she won her most recent battle honours clearing sea-lanes in to Umm Qasr in Iraq during Operation Telic in 2003.[mappress]Press Release, July 1 2013; Image: Royal Navy View post tag: Naval View post tag: Warships British Navy Warships to Support Opening of Tynwald View post tag: Mine Training & Education View post tag: Frigate View post tag: vessel View post tag: Hunt-Class View post tag: News by topic View post tag: Opening View post tag: Support July 1, 2013 View post tag: HMS Brocklesby View post tag: HMS Somerset View post tag: British Share this articlelast_img read more

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We are happy to announce that…

first_imgThe McMahon Insurance Agency building in Ocean City is located at 901 Simpson Avenue. We are back in our Ocean City office!The fire took place on February 10th and the cleanup took longer than expected. We never actually saw a flame and just had smoke damage. With smoke damage, the entire building had to be cleaned, then painted. All of the insulation and duct work on one side of the building had to be replaced. As an insurance agent it is our job to be ready for disaster when it strikes. We are happy to report our phones were off only the Monday after the fire. As with Hurricane Sandy, we prepared for the event before it happened. We built the office in Marmora (on the mainland right outside Ocean City) 10 years ago because of growth and in case we could not get to the Ocean City office. For the last two months most of the Ocean City office has been working in the Marmora office in the conference room & on folding tables. Honestly, it worked really well!Over the coming months we will feature some lessons learned to help mitigate exposure and help you if you ever have a loss.We need to thank those who helped us get back into our office as quickly as possible:Ocean City Fire Department- They worked with us before, during, and after the fire. When the office was originally being built, these guys talked us into   installing a lock box that has keys and codes to the building. So when there was smoke in our building they unlocked the door and let themselves in. Without the box they would have let themselves in… but it would have involved breaking glass. The firefighters also worked hard to minimize any collateral damage to our building as they sought out the source of the smoke. Ocean City Police Department– The OCPD helped direct traffic and kept the McMahon family members informed about the situation.Marmora and Margate Fire Departments– These guys came to back-up the Ocean City Fire Dept., and earlier that day all three departments were at a much larger structure fire.Mike Contino and Pete Madden- from Berkshire Hathaway office next door. Each called a McMahon to let them know they saw smoke.Ocean City Mayor Jay Gillian– He stopped by at 8:30pm that Sunday night while the fire was active to make sure we were okay.ServPro of Cape May and Cumberland Counties– We called Barb and Pat Jones at 8:15pm on Sunday to let them know we needed their help. Their team was literally waiting for firefighters to finish up that night to walk the property and get to work.Franklin Mutual Insurance and Merchants Mutual Insurance – The insurance companies who insure the building and insure our agency. Halliday-Leonard – Owners Scott and Keith were here that Sunday night to help us. Keith worked with the subcontractors to get them lined up to repair the building. The contractors who did the work: Wilson Plumbing, Cape Installation, Aponte Painting, Pinelands Demolition, Complete Interiors, Power Restoration, Avalon Flooring, Patti’s Party World. Our adjuster from Decker and Associates, James Matroni.Ted Vaughn from Barra-Vaughn Insurance Agency. Ted left us a message the morning after the fire. If there was anything we needed his office would be glad to help. Very classy. Richard Booth & Jim Bourgeois who offered us office space in our time of need. We would also like to thank our customers for working with us through the fire and being flexible. Thank you to our staff who handled a difficult situation with ease. The community, friends and again our customers who offered to help and keep us positive. It is an experience we hope you never face but can tell you, if you ever do, we live in an amazing community. And yes we did have enough insurance! If you ever have any questions or would like to review your insurance we will be happy to do so. Thank you, The McMahons McMahon Insurance Agency| 609-399-0060| Email | Websitelast_img read more

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The Bradman Lake Group

first_imgThe Bradman Lake Group (Bristol, Avon) has launched an infeed and form, fill and seal flowrapper combination that enables large-volume confectionery manufacturers to pack bar products in continuous operations at speeds of up to 1,000 ppm. Key to its performance is a high-tech row distribution system, which accepts and aligns bakery confectionery bars into a new high-speed Flowtronic flowrapping machine. The system features a height-adjustable, single-belt feeding process which reduces product transfer by 50%, says the firm.last_img

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Chance The Rapper Saves The Streaming Service SoundCloud

first_imgSoundCloud confirmed the word that it was around to stay, later posting this to its official Twitter page: In recent weeks, things have not been looking good for the streaming service SoundCloud. Rumors have been circulating that the popular site would only be able to stay afloat for fifty more days, and industry experts had more or less agreed that the streaming service was on its last leg and not going to last much longer. After firing a good chunk of their staff due to budget cuts, SoundCloud clarified that they were fully funded through Q4, though projections for the company still looked bleak.Chance The Rapper Inspires Chicago Bulls To Donate $1 Million To Chicago Public SchoolsHowever, such projections failed to take into account one thing: Chance The Rapper. Chance holds a special place in many of our hearts, not just for his music, but for his philanthropic streak that has widely gained him fans from all walks of life. After donating millions of dollars to Chicago Public Schools, it’s clear that the independent artists digs being a hero. Yesterday, Chance tweeted the following: Turns out Chance did some hard work fast, as this morning, the rapper tweeted this:center_img Bless you, Chance the Rapper, for being the hero we don’t deserve.[H/T YourEDM]last_img read more

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Gauging street change over time

first_imgNikhil Naik, Scott Duke Kominers, and their collaborators are hoping to transform the way scientists study urban environments, with an assist from Google.In joint work with Edward L. Glaeser, the Fred and Eleanor Glimp Professor of Economics at Harvard, and César A. Hidalgo and Ramesh Raskar, associate professors at the MIT Media Lab, Kominers, an associate professor in the entrepreneurial management unit at Harvard Business School (HBS) and the department of economics, and Naik, a Prize Fellow in economics, history, and politics, authored a study that uses computer vision algorithms to examine millions of Google Street View images to measure how urban areas are changing.“Lots of people, including social scientists and urban planners, are interested in studying why places evolve and how much change happens in different cities,” Naik said. “But there is a lack of data on the physical aspects of urban change.”That’s where Google Street View imagery comes in. For the past decade, Naik said, the tech giant has collected millions of Street View images from across the country as part of its mapping service. It also keeps those imaging maps up to date by periodically rephotographing the same locations in major cities. Consequently, Street View contains a rich database that researchers can tap to follow cities through time.Using Street View images to track urban change isn’t a new idea. In 2014, then-doctoral student Jackelyn Hwang and Robert Sampson, the Henry Ford II Professor of the Social Sciences at Harvard, published a study that employed volunteers to analyze Street View images and locate signs of gentrification across 3,000 city blocks in Chicago.West First Street in South Boston has seen significant development from 2007 to 2014.Naik and co-authors took this effort a step further by using artificial intelligence to automate the process.“By having a computer do it, we were able to really scale up the analysis, so we examined images of about 1.6 million street blocks from five cities: Boston, New York, Washington, D.C., Baltimore, and Detroit,” Naik said.At the heart of the system is an artificial intelligence algorithm the collaborators taught to view street scenes the same way humans do. Originally developed in work among Naik, Raskar, and Hidalgo during Naik’s graduate studies at the MIT Media Lab, the algorithm computes “Streetscore,” a rating for perceived safety of streetscapes, based on Street View photos and image preferences collected from thousands of online volunteers.“We built on this algorithm to calculate Streetchange, the change in Streetscore for pairs of Street View images of the same location captured seven years apart,” Naik said. “A positive value of Streetchange is associated with new construction or upgrades, and a negative value is associated with overall decline.”In two validation studies — one using images scored by humans, and another using municipal data from the city of Boston — the authors found that their algorithm accurately detected how blocks changed between 2007 and 2014. Armed with Streetchange data generated by the algorithm, Naik and others then took a street-level look at several longstanding theories of urban change involving urban economics, planning, and sociology.“We found a lot of support for what’s called the ‘human capital agglomeration theory,’ which argues that you tend to see urban improvement when you have a significant density of highly educated individuals,” Kominers said. “The data suggests that other demographic characteristics — factors like income, housing costs, or ethnic composition — do not seem to matter as much as density and education do.”The metamorphosis of Boston’s Seaport District is one of the city’s major successes.The study provided some support for a theory called “tipping,” in which neighborhoods that have already developed tend to develop further. The authors also found evidence for the “invasion” theory, which argues that areas around successful neighborhoods, or close to central business districts, tend to see greater improvement over time.This highlights how urban inequality is real, Kominers said. “Our findings reinforce the extreme importance of human capital and education at all stages of development,” he said. “It matters for people’s access to jobs and livelihoods, but it’s also important to their abilities to improve their environments. And the patterns of urban change we see help illustrate why urban inequality persists.”Naik said that the study shows that artificial intelligence and geospatial data can be used to measure the built environment and sample populations and to conduct urban science at unprecedented resolution and scale. “We’ve focused on urban change here, but there are many possibilities for the future.”This research was supported with funding from the International Growth Centre, the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, a Star Family Challenge grant, the National Science Foundation, the William F. Milton Fund at Harvard, the Ng Fund of the Harvard Center of Mathematical Sciences and Applications, the Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group sponsored by the Institute for New Economic Thinking, the Taubman Center for State and Local Government, the Google Living Labs Award, and a gift from Facebook.To learn more about Streetchange, visit its website.last_img read more

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A virus that targets the elderly

first_imgGAZETTE: How many folks have been asked not to come in?CHEN: [The number is] very small — three or four — because we told our Family Advisory Council we were moving forward with this and sent written and email communication to our families and to frequent visitors. So most people were not surprised when they came to visit.We are also no longer allowing volunteer programming, which is a sad thing. We have a huge number of volunteers, but I think it is a prudent measure. We also have a wonderful, multigenerational program on one of our campuses, which is co-located with a K-8 school. The kids would come over to do activities and visit. That has been temporarily suspended. We also hosted quite a number of events — parties and celebrations and things of that nature — which have all been suspended until further notice.GAZETTE: How hard is it to make these decisions, given the importance of social connectivity and visits from family to the lives and emotional health of your older residents?CHEN: It’s incredibly hard. At the end of the day, for the people who live with us, this is their home. And in our homes, we have visitors, guests, people coming in and out. Likewise, when someone is living here, we’d like them to have visitors and social support. But we’re trying to balance the psychological and emotional well-being of our residents against their heightened risk for complications and mortality from this virus. We continue to learn more, but the highest-risk group — if you’re talking about mortality — is people over the age of 80 who have comorbid conditions. That describes a lot of people who live here.GAZETTE: How closely have you followed the Life Care Center situation near Seattle? Are there lessons that you can draw from that? Or is what you’re doing drawn from standard public health practice?CHEN: I only know what’s been published. What we have seen from that is it’s about avoiding exposure to an infected person as much as possible, and then being as aggressive as possible if exposure occurred.I hope that when this all improves, everyone who’s been involved would openly share what we should be doing as a nation in terms of our public health infrastructure — in particular for our older patients and those in long-term care. “Because there’s no vaccine, because there’s no targeted treatment for this virus yet, we would implore the public to really think about protecting our most vulnerable population, namely the very old and those with chronic medical conditions.” This is part of our Coronavirus Update series in which Harvard specialists in epidemiology, infectious disease, economics, politics, and other disciplines offer insights into what the latest developments in the COVID-19 outbreak may bring.As the number of cases and deaths alike mount from COVID-19, the respiratory illness associated with the new coronavirus, the toll of fatalities at a skilled nursing center in Washington state reached 19, highlighting the deep danger the virus presents to the elderly.Harvard-affiliated Hebrew SeniorLife offers a continuum of care for 3,000 elderly people daily, with a range of services including residential assisted living, short-term rehabilitation, outpatient services, and long-term care for those with chronic illness. In a Q&A interview aimed at understanding the challenges involved, Harvard Medical School Assistant Professor Helen Chen, Hebrew SeniorLife’s chief medical officer, discussed steps the facility has taken to combat the virus and the outlook going forward.Q&AHelen ChenGAZETTE:  How concerned are you for your elderly residents and patients in the face of this epidemic?CHEN:  We’re very worried, and I know they’re anxious because I’ve been getting a lot of emails from them. For the inpatients, many are here because they’re not cognitively able and, for them, we’re just trying not to make them anxious. But it is really the families of those patients and residents who have expressed the most concern.GAZETTE: Are you taking any special steps in the face of this?CHEN: We’ve enhanced staff training and are looking at revising protocols regarding personal protective equipment. But the main intervention is limiting visitation, and no visiting if you are ill. We recognize that many people who live here are reliant on their family members for emotional and social support, but we’re encouraging people to limit visits with an eye toward protecting the vulnerable people who live with us. Today I heard from security that we’ve had a significant decline in the number of visits, which is, I think, a good thing.For those who do come, we have moved to screening all visitors who enter any of our health care campuses and most of our housing sites. The health care campuses are a particular focus because people who live in a long-term chronic hospital or in the rehab unit are at high risk. They are older and have comorbid conditions, so every visitor receives a health and travel assessment before they’re allowed on campus.GAZETTE: Does that screening happen when you walk in the door?CHEN: Yes. There’s a symptom review, there’s a travel review, and there’s an exposure review. And if the answer to any of those questions is yes, then you’re asked to not come in. And so far people have been compliant and have left. So that is a good thing. “We’ve enhanced staff training and are looking at revising protocols regarding personal protective equipment. But the main intervention is limiting visitation, and no visiting if you are ill.” GAZETTE: What should family members know ahead of time about visiting an elderly family member, either in your facility or another? Should they put all visits off? Monitor their own health and then make a decision?CHEN: It’s a very individualized decision regarding whether or not to visit with someone. Everybody should use common sense and judgment about symptoms. If you have a cough and a fever, if you’ve got respiratory symptoms and you’re short of breath, if you’ve traveled to a place of concern or if you may have been exposed to someone who did — especially if you’re symptomatic — then I would definitely ask, “Do I really need to visit my grandma today? Can I wait and can I Skype her? Can I do FaceTime?”I know that’s hard for some of our older adults who aren’t technologically savvy, but maybe now is the time to get them hooked up. It really would be heartbreaking if, in wanting to do something positive for someone’s emotional or mental health, you ended up infecting them.GAZETTE: Any advice to people considering elective surgery like hip replacement that might land them in a rehabilitation facility? Should they consider delaying it?CHEN: I haven’t seen any specific recommendations — and I’m not advising anyone — but my personal take, separate from the rehab issue, is to ask, do you want to be in the hospital during this time if something’s really completely elective and can absolutely be delayed? Why not wait until we either know more or we have more experience or we have more clarity about the true prevalence? If it could wait, I might consider having a conversation with my primary care doctor or surgeon.GAZETTE: Anything else the public should know concerning this new virus and our elderly, whether at Hebrew SeniorLife or elsewhere?CHEN: I’m saying this to everybody — everybody — and I can’t emphasize this enough: really, wash your hands, wash your hands, wash your hands. I know people are tired of hearing it, but it is really true. During the SARS epidemic, washing your hands, using good cough etiquette, using social distancing and not touching your face, they estimate dropped SARS spread by 30 to 50 percent.And, because there’s no vaccine, because there’s no targeted treatment for this virus yet, we would implore the public to really think about protecting our most vulnerable population, namely the very old and those with chronic medical conditions. Think carefully about whether — even if you think you just have a cold — you want to expose this very vulnerable population to your viral pathogens. Our elders are vulnerable and we’re all very concerned about their health.center_img The Daily Gazette Sign up for daily emails to get the latest Harvard news.last_img read more

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